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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by cr115 View Post
    No guys. I havent been to the southern end in 10 years at least...Are all those big
    beautiful trees gone?!
    no. stover creek

  2. #22
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    02-20-2013
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    Upper East Side of Texas
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    Itís a shame that the hemlocks are dying. I had no idea. Iím thankful that I visited when I did.
    Apparently the Internet didnít get the email about the hemlocks. I skimmed the NPS and various trail pages online before posting. No mention of dead hemlocks.
    Wayne

  3. #23
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    Stover Creek was fantastic but short. Would be great for base camping.

    Consider checking out Congaree National Park if you're looking for virgin old growth in the south east. It's not the mountains but it's the largest remaining stand of bottom land hardwood in the world. You just want to make sure to go when the water levels are low. I was there two years ago in March and it was magical. Very few people there also. Make sure you go before mosquito season and get the backcountry map that they sell in the gift shop. You can stay on the short designated trails or go deep into the back woods to see some of the more remote areas that the loggers could never get to. They call it the Redwood of the east for a reason
    "I am learning nothing in this trivial world of [humans]. I must break away and get out into the mountains to learn the news." --John Muir

  4. #24

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    The best virgin forest is Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest. There also seems to be some in Rome GA. Just keep in mind old growth and virgin forest are not the same. There is lots of old growth forest along that section of trail you are looking at.

  5. #25
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    06-16-2007
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    anniston, alabama
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    I didnt know the difference. Thanks for that. So there is still some "old growth" on the southern end of the trail?

  6. #26
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    06-15-2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by cr115 View Post
    I didnt know the difference. Thanks for that. So there is still some "old growth" on the southern end of the trail?
    Yes, there are some big old trees along there. It's a fairly open forest without a lot of underbrush early in the spring.

    BTW, the two biggest trees along the AT are the Keiffer Oak in Virginia at over 18 feet around and 300 years old. The Dover Oak in NY is slightly larger. Pretty impressive trees.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  7. #27
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    02-26-2008
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    Cleveland,Tennessee
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    Warning,,stay away at that time,,it is like a parade full of all kinds of humanity,,it will sour you quickly on the Appy trail experience.

  8. #28
    Registered User LittleRock's Avatar
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    01-10-2014
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    Raleigh, NC
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    Not on the AT, but there is a nice chunk of old growth forest in the Linville Gorge wilderness area in NC. Beautiful place. It was never logged because the gorge walls were too steep to get logging equipment down there.
    It's all good in the woods.

  9. #29

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    The AT can be a mucky mess in March--and that is no fun with it churned up by a few hundred of your hiking buddies. It might not be that cold this year but this has been a wet winter in North Georgia.
    Photo is from March ‎17, ‎2017, between Tray Mtn and Dick's Creek Gap.
    DSCN2827.JPG

  10. #30
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    And that Georgia clay can be really slick when wet. I found that out when all of a sudden I was no longer on my feet and my face was in the mud. I was just happy I didn't bite my tongue in half or broke any teeth when I landed.


    Quote Originally Posted by maptester View Post
    The AT can be a mucky mess in March--and that is no fun with it churned up by a few hundred of your hiking buddies. It might not be that cold this year but this has been a wet winter in North Georgia.
    Photo is from March ‎17, ‎2017, between Tray Mtn and Dick's Creek Gap.
    DSCN2827.JPG
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  11. #31
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    01-29-2019
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    Canton, GA
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    I honestly find the section from Unicoi to Winding Stair much more enjoyable than Amicalola to Unicoi. Blood Mountain is a highlight, but that's a day trip from Neels or weekend overnight from Woody. Nowhere on the southern section of the AT will you find anything remotely close to solitude in March. I will be on the trail from late April into May, when the weather should be a little warmer and the beginnings of green are returning to the forest. It has been a fairly warm winter this year, with not even a hint of snow flurries where I live in North GA. Hopefully this bodes well for my intention of trekking with my lighter weight setup in early spring.

    I'm thinking about a 5-day trip on the BMT in October. Should be pretty quiet, good hiking temps, and colorful scenery.

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