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  1. #1

    Default Lyme and essential oils

    Iíve actually done some online searches on exactly this topic recently.

    https://www.laboratoryequipment.com/...location%3dtop

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by perrymk View Post
    I’ve actually done some online searches on exactly this topic recently.

    https://www.laboratoryequipment.com/...location%3dtop
    Killing bacteria in a culture is a world away from a clinical treatment. Don't hold your breath waiting for a magic cure.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

  3. #3
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    Agree, likely 5-8 years of work before we know if this is really something worthwhile. There are a lot of things that look good at first in the lab and then fail repeatedly in human trials, like turmeric for example (not for lyme, for other conditions).

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    Are you familiar with Stephen Buhner's body of Lyme Disease work? I have these two books. It's heavier reading.

    https://www.amazon.com/Healing-Lyme-...G17JRYRTRNTPTS

    https://www.amazon.com/Natural-Treat...S5AEZDQZAEKAN8

  5. #5
    Registered User Tklp's Avatar
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    After researching the effectiveness of various repellants, and testing some, it appears that only oil of lemon eucalyptus has *some* utility. The rest are unfortunately bunkum, and could also serve to attract bears and other wildlife. And I can personally testify that, not only does oil of lemon eucalyptus not repel biting flies, it may even attract them. I don't want to play with lyme disease or mosquito-borne illnesses so I always bring picaridin (less nasty than DEET) and my permethrin-infused shirt. I also plan on buying permethrin to treat my outdoor gear.

  6. #6
    Registered User IslandPete's Avatar
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    Permethrin! Treat everything, not just your shirt. Helps with mosquitos too.

  7. #7

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    Check this site: https://www.imnotgonnagetticked.com/ ( the owner did a clinic at out hiking clubs meeting)

  8. #8
    Registered User jungleland1972's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mouser999 View Post
    Check this site: https://www.imnotgonnagetticked.com/ ( the owner did a clinic at out hiking clubs meeting)
    That has to be the worst website ever, looks like it was built in the early 90's. And he made something that you apply that is "CHEMICAL FREE!"? He is either just jumping right into a naturalistic fallacy or he doesn't understand what a chemical is.

  9. #9

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    Just passing something along. Dont think many club members were impressed either

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    It has been clinically concluded ticks, like mosquitos, are attracted through their olfactory senses. Chemical odors do play a role in whom and to what degree get bitten.

    In the citation Perrymk linked garlic and other herbs have been historically concluded to have potent anti bacterial properties. This has been known about garlic for over three millennia. Outstanding French biologist, microbiologist and chemist Louis Pasteur, renowned for discoveries in vaccinations, fermentation, and pasteurization, developing vaccines for rabies and anthrax, and refuting spontaneous generation effectively utilized the anti bacterial properties of garlic. Perrymk's linked article cites continuation of this work. This work is not unfounded. Garlic/garlic compounds MAY affect tick borne bacterial diseases through alternative treatment plans, ceasing infectious bacterial development, survivability of those bacteria, etc. This is a good example of how science can take a mainstream patentable pharmacological antibiotic research and development approach while ignoring "natural" therapeutic modalities.

  11. #11

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    I'm a fan of Stephen Buhner's work and used some of his recommendation when I had lyme. I used it as a complement to traditional antibiotics. Prevention is best I treat every thing but my underwear with Permethrin. www.insectshield.com does some good things as well.

  12. #12

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    Sugary foods and other unnatural intakes draw the little buggers I think. Personally I would be packing organic garlic and other odiferous herbs.

    If you get it: http://lymeresourcemedical.com/a-bri...-on-dr-raxlen/ https://rawlsmd.com/health-articles/...tm_source=bing


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    Quote Originally Posted by greenmtnboy View Post
    Sugary foods and other unnatural intakes draw the little buggers I think. Personally I would be packing organic garlic and other odiferous herbs.
    I live off sugary foods and other unnatural substances and I get significantly less bites than my wife that stays away from all the crap food that I eat. I've also experimented with not eating and then eating stupid amounts of garlic (love the stuff so a whole bulb in a meal is great to me) and I've never noticed any change in my appeal to biting bugs, with or without garlic. YMMV
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

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