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  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by cneill13 View Post
    Why don't you try to earn some money? I am always amazed when I see people in their 20's or 30's long hiking trails.
    If there's nothing wrong with it, why did you even say it?

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by cneill13 View Post
    Why don't you try to earn some money? I am always amazed when I see people in their 20's or 30's long hiking trails. Not that there is anything wrong with it but when I was that age, all I did was trying to carve out a career in life. I guess I am just a bit jealous.
    All a question of priorities. A lot of folks in my generation are not as interested in pursuing more expensive life goals (home ownership, multiple children, etc.) so a thru-hike is comparatively easy to plan. Without the obligations of family or mortgage payments, it can be simple to stop renting your apartment, plan a "gap year" into a transition between jobs, and hit the trail. Of course, if you're saddled with student loans or health problems or family members who depend on you (be it children, parents, siblings, whoever), it's not so easy to afford, but even some of those things come down to priorities. I chose a less prestigious university that gave me a full ride over a more prestigious university where I would've had to pay tuition, so I graduated debt-free. I made sure I was qualified for a field in high demand. I worked full-time for three years, which allowed me to save up enough to both have a retirement account and also take up to a whole year off for my thru-hike.

    So I'm now 25 and sure, I couldn't buy a house or afford a $20,000 car or wedding or whatever, and I'm not on my way to a senior executive position, but I have zero interest in any of those things. Instead I'm much happier to have the freedom to hike a long trail or travel the world.
    Being career-focused and money-driven is one way to live your 20's and 30's, but not the only way.
    A.T. 2018 Thru-hike Hopeful
    Follow along at www.tefltrekker.com

  3. #43
    Registered User gbolt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crushed Grapes View Post
    Ha, awesome! It's the day after my birthday, and my wife will be able to see me off from Springer
    I would suggest going to the ATC website and register your start date. This year, March 1st and 10th were very popular. Of course Friday, Saturday and Sunday departures are always high numbers. Tuesday and Wedsdays are the best low number days. Remember itís not just about Springer but tends to have an impact all the way to Neals Gap and then TOG Hostel. I ended up leaving the Day before my birthday this year! Just couldnít stop at the first shelter after the Approach Trail! Lol.

    P.S. Splurge and get a room at Amicalola Lodge (Again, early reservations is a good idea) Leaving my wife was harder than I planned but was great to have travel time and that last night with her. It allowed her to literally see me walk through the Gate and on my way! I wouldnít change that start for anything! And yes, I thought the Approach Trail was well worth it! Most important of all, is donít overthink it all! It will work out the way it is meant to work out! Just Keep the FI5 and Keep HikN^
    "gbolt" on the Trail

    I am Third

    We are here to help one another along life's journey. Keep the Faith!

    YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCik...NPHW7vu3vhRBGA

  4. #44
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    03-10-2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by gbolt View Post
    I would suggest going to the ATC website and register your start date. This year, March 1st and 10th were very popular. Of course Friday, Saturday and Sunday departures are always high numbers. Tuesday and Wedsdays are the best low number days. Remember it’s not just about Springer but tends to have an impact all the way to Neals Gap and then TOG Hostel. I ended up leaving the Day before my birthday this year! Just couldn’t stop at the first shelter after the Approach Trail! Lol.

    P.S. Splurge and get a room at Amicalola Lodge (Again, early reservations is a good idea) Leaving my wife was harder than I planned but was great to have travel time and that last night with her. It allowed her to literally see me walk through the Gate and on my way! I wouldn’t change that start for anything! And yes, I thought the Approach Trail was well worth it! Most important of all, is don’t overthink it all! It will work out the way it is meant to work out! Just Keep the FI5 and Keep HikN^
    I registered months ago for my date, I was the first one, lol. Last I checked, 8 others were starting the same day as me. Take into account those that are starting and not registering...woof. Most definitely springing for a room at Amicalola Lodge, can't wait. Thanks for the tips!

  5. #45
    Registered User GankenBerry's Avatar
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    12-14-2017
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    bunch of cardio and if you have access to a stair master type thing.. that would be super helpful. oh and also just hiking

  6. #46
    Registered User Bubblehead's Avatar
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    I live in Florida also. Just as important to get your "downhill" muscles in shape....climbing/descending stairs will do this. 3 times a week, I climb/descend the 12 floors of stairs at Florida Hospital in Daytona Beach for 60-90 minutes....all leg muscles getting in shape.

  7. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by KnightErrant View Post
    All a question of priorities. A lot of folks in my generation are not as interested in pursuing more expensive life goals (home ownership, multiple children, etc.) so a thru-hike is comparatively easy to plan. Without the obligations of family or mortgage payments, it can be simple to stop renting your apartment, plan a "gap year" into a transition between jobs, and hit the trail. Of course, if you're saddled with student loans or health problems or family members who depend on you (be it children, parents, siblings, whoever), it's not so easy to afford, but even some of those things come down to priorities. I chose a less prestigious university that gave me a full ride over a more prestigious university where I would've had to pay tuition, so I graduated debt-free. I made sure I was qualified for a field in high demand. I worked full-time for three years, which allowed me to save up enough to both have a retirement account and also take up to a whole year off for my thru-hike.

    So I'm now 25 and sure, I couldn't buy a house or afford a $20,000 car or wedding or whatever, and I'm not on my way to a senior executive position, but I have zero interest in any of those things. Instead I'm much happier to have the freedom to hike a long trail or travel the world.
    Being career-focused and money-driven is one way to live your 20's and 30's, but not the only way.
    Diferent strokes for different folks


    Those first 10 years can not be made-up. Thats the foundation for a 401k that doubles from 55-65. So you have enough to retire....instead of half as much as need, and work till you die.

    You can object, but thats the math, and way the system works. Your way better off not working 55-65, than not working 21-31.
    Last edited by MuddyWaters; 12-11-2018 at 09:01.

  8. #48
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    ^Definitely did not mean to suggest that people don't need to work at all in their twenties! But I firmly believe that with planning, spending one or two years on experiences in my twenties is worth two to four additional years of work --or more likely, just living on more modest means-- in my senior years.

    I grew up watching my parents work hard, live modestly, and invest wisely, and they both retired by the age of 50. Since my siblings and I all left the nest, they've started traveling more and investing time and money in their hobbies, and now they're starting a new business because they were bored with retirement. I am inspired by them and under their guidance I've had a roth IRA since I was a 20-year old college student working at a horse farm.

    BUT, at the same time, they are not healthy enough to undertake something like a thru-hike or the other outdoor adventure sports that I enjoy. The math may be in your favor for working from 21-31, but there's no guarantee of health from 55-65. So I'm doing my best to balance planning for the future with taking advantage of my health and fitness right now. Of course, again, it's about priorities. I'm not planning to have three kids like my parents did, or own a four-bedroom house in the countryside, etc. If I wanted to afford those things, it would probably be worth it to work straight through to retirement and take the gamble on my future fitness level.
    A.T. 2018 Thru-hike Hopeful
    Follow along at www.tefltrekker.com

  9. #49

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    My best advice would be to get your body conditioned to climbing and different terrains. Walking thru creeks, sand and uphill can do a number on calf muscles. condition your back to carry the load of a thru-hike. Break in those hiking boots. Sounds like you've done the research...make sure you can enjoy it all by toning those muscles. Have fun!

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