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  1. #1
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    Default Break in New Shoes?

    When you buy new shoes, lets say Altras for new Altras, do you just toss your old ones and continue with 20 mile days on new ones? Do you carry those old ones for a few days? What problems do you look for buying new ones and doing big miles right away? I'm going from the Superior 3.0 to the Lone Peak 4.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    I put on the new ones and go just like I did on the old ones, no break in needed.

  3. #3

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    Did you break in your first pair?
    "Sleepy alligator in the noonday sun
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  4. #4
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    Maybe I did break in my first pair because I would hike near home 10 to 12 miles, now I have new shoes and want to do a 20 miler in a far and distant land where no one will come to my rescue and I'm worried about that like Pikes Peak....

  5. #5
    Registered User Christoph's Avatar
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    I just threw 'em away, put the new on, and kept on truckin'. After a full day of hiking, the feet were so worn out I couldn't feel anything anyway. Lol
    - Trail name: Thumper

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by vickietyer View Post
    Maybe I did break in my first pair because I would hike near home 10 to 12 miles, now I have new shoes and want to do a 20 miler in a far and distant land where no one will come to my rescue and I'm worried about that like Pikes Peak....
    Maybe or you did? If you did, do you think it was helpful or necessary for you to do so?

    The only thing I ever do with trail runners is to transfer my Superfeet inserts. That's as a section hiker using Salomon's. My feet are much more appreciative of the new shoes than the old ones every time. If you are dialed in to a particular model, shouldn't be too much different about a new pair other than they are not falling apart and are again being supportive.

    Of course you could be different and have to break in new shoes for whatever personal reason, in which case you have your answer.

    Pay attention to your feet and slow down if necessary though so you don't need rescuing. You'll need to do so for about as long as it took to break in your first pair, whatever that was in miles or days.
    "Sleepy alligator in the noonday sun
    Sleepin by the river just like he usually done
    Call for his whisky
    He can call for his tea
    Call all he wanta but he can't call me..."
    Robert Hunter & Ron McKernan

    Whiteblaze.net User Agreement.

  7. #7

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    Models do change unless you bought the exact same pair.
    Worst case a few miles around the neighborhood after work would give you an idea.

    Most of us just put them on and go- but none of us know if you are prone to any blisters or hot spots you might need to work out. Sometimes you aren't breaking the shoes in, but your feet into the shoes.

    Going superior to lone peak... there is a stack height difference that may effect your gait. Not something you'll resolve in a few miles around the block or a 20 mile hike. Some minor soreness is possible... on the plus side you're going from less cush to more cush so the transition won't be too extreme.

    If you're nervous- the conservative answer is to plan a different (lower risk) hike while you answer the questions yourself.

    If it's just a day hike and you can deal with it- toss the superiors in and go for it.

  8. #8
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    I think the general belief is that it takes 20 miles of hiking to truly break in new hiking shoes-but that's a general rule of thumb. For whatever reason, I've always found this question interesting and always like to read about.
    "I told my Ma's and Pa's I was coming to them mountains and they acted as if they was gutshot. Ma, I sez's, them mountains is the marrow of the world and by God, I was right". Del Gue

  9. #9
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    Break in is not much of a problem for me when I'm using trail runners. Generally different year models of the same shoe are built on the sames lasts so the fit is the same. When you change brands or models sometimes the fit is different so there may be some new friction points that I have to adjust to (so I need more athletic tape than usual.) This was much more of an issue back when we wore leather boots. Those do require some significant break in time (a solid week.) There were a few tricks to help out with that.

  10. #10

  11. #11

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    I have used Montrail heat moldable inserts for several years. They last far longer than the trail runners they are in. I throw away the inserts that came with the shoes, slide in the Montrails and am ready to go.
    Last edited by peakbagger; 08-28-2018 at 16:12.

  12. #12
    Is it raining yet?
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    Totally depends on the boot. My Vasque Sundowners needed 100 miles of hiking before they fit like the glove they were promised to be. Thereafter they were wonderful. My L.L. Bean Crestas needed 0 miles break in. Laced them up & never looked back. I'm on my 2nd pair and won't buy any other....
    Be Prepared

  13. #13

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    With new Altras
    I wear them a bit
    To verify fit
    And off I go.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

  14. #14
    MuddyWaters's Avatar
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    No need to "break-in "

    But, shoes do break-in somewhat as you wear them. They mold to your feet etc. to reach maximum comfort. This may take anywhere from 10 to 75 miles depending on the shoes. My most recent shoes I would say took 50 miles to break in well. but at the same time the insole material was firm enough that it never did really mold much to my toes etc., even at 250 miles
    "Inevitably, a long distance hiker must choose between travelling light, and not travelling at all." - Earl V. Shaffer

  15. #15
    Registered User BuckeyeBill's Avatar
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    Remember to not buy more than one pair at a time, as hiking can change your feet enough to require a different size and/or width.
    Blackheart

  16. #16
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BuckeyeBill View Post
    Remember to not buy more than one pair at a time, as hiking can change your feet enough to require a different size and/or width.
    Buy a half size bigger to start with.
    It only took me a few decades to figure this out. No matter the shoe or boot, every time I was professionally fitted with one of those big metal shoe fitting Gizmos, I got blisters or lost black toenails. When the lightbulb finally lit up and I increased my footwear 1/2 size the blisters and black toenails disappeared.
    Wayne

  17. #17
    MuddyWaters's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BuckeyeBill View Post
    Remember to not buy more than one pair at a time, as hiking can change your feet enough to require a different size and/or width.
    For newbies maybe

    If youve hiked a couple thousand miles, feet dont keep spreading. Buying multiple pr of any shoe you like is good advice, they wont be same next yr.
    "Inevitably, a long distance hiker must choose between travelling light, and not travelling at all." - Earl V. Shaffer

  18. #18
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    For newbies maybe

    If youve hiked a couple thousand miles, feet dont keep spreading. Buying multiple pr of any shoe you like is good advice, they wont be same next yr.
    Strange but very true. Shoe companies seem to feel to compelled to change perfectly good shoes for apparent reason. Except perhaps cost cutting for the company.
    Wayne
    "So it's sorta social, demented and sad, but social. Right?
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  19. #19

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    People like new stuff. More marketing than cost cutting, I believe.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

  20. #20
    MuddyWaters's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Venchka View Post
    Strange but very true. Shoe companies seem to feel to compelled to change perfectly good shoes for apparent reason. Except perhaps cost cutting for the company.
    Wayne
    Every runner i know hates it also.

    People buy multiple prs, in advance, because they wont be same later. Some kind of f'd up marketing by shoe companies for sure.

    Then have to try multiple prs again to find ones like when those gone.

    But to be real, all these companies do is give basic specs and colors to chinese mfgs. Pick out fabrics, midsole density, thickness, tread, and let the chinese bulk producer do rest.
    "Inevitably, a long distance hiker must choose between travelling light, and not travelling at all." - Earl V. Shaffer

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