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  1. #21
    Super Moderator Marta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    Every runner i know hates it also.

    People buy multiple prs, in advance, because they wont be same later. Some kind of f'd up marketing by shoe companies for sure.

    Then have to try multiple prs again to find ones like when those gone.

    But to be real, all these companies do is give basic specs and colors to chinese mfgs. Pick out fabrics, midsole density, thickness, tread, and let the chinese bulk producer do rest.
    True dat. I just ordered three pairs of Cascadia 12s, on sale from REI. Saved $120. I've been wearing Cascadias since 2006. There were a couple of years when the quality deteriorated, but the 12s have been holding up okay for me.

    So if you see me on the AT next year wearing out of date shoes...
    If not NOW, then WHEN?

    ME>GA 2006
    http://www.trailjournals.com/entry.cfm?trailname=3277

    Instagram hiking photos: five.leafed.clover

  2. #22
    Registered User BuckeyeBill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    For newbies maybe

    If you've hiked a couple thousand miles, feet don't keep spreading. Buying multiple pr of any shoe you like is good advice, they wont be same next yr.
    This is true for some people here, but really, how many people on here have that many miles on their hiking resume?
    Blackheart

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by BuckeyeBill View Post
    This is true for some people here, but really, how many people on here have that many miles on their hiking resume?
    Quite a few. Thats not many miles for persons who have hiked for a few yrs. A couple hundred miles per year adds up after 5-10 yrs.

    And 1 long hike does the same
    Last edited by MuddyWaters; 09-04-2018 at 11:20.

  4. #24
    Registered User BuckeyeBill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    Quite a few. Thats not many miles for persons who have hiked for a few yrs. A couple hundred miles per year adds up after 5-10 yrs.

    And 1 long hike does the same
    What you say about a couple hundred miles per year for 5-10 years add up, but I my answer was directed at the OP original question. Not knowing about what to do with old shoes indicates to me that he/she doesn't hike that many miles.
    Blackheart

  5. #25

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    Didn't break in any of my 5 pair that I wore (including the pair started with). And there was nothing that felt better than putting on a new pair of shoes.

  6. #26
    Registered User Crossup's Avatar
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    I believe a lot has to do with how well your foot compares to "normal" or "average size". Obviously differing manufacturers have different ideas on foot shape/size so Salomon for example might favor narrow feet. My point is if you are a good match for someone's shoe breakin is not necessary, I've purchased several Merril and Salomon shoes, gone straight from box to a week on the trail with my feet 100% happy. On the other hand I've seen many thru hikers still fighting foot/shoe issues at the 1000 mile mark which tells me they either cant find a good fitting shoe or dont know how to tell a good fit. It seems obvious, the poorer the fit the more you must break in the shoe to conform to your foot.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crossup View Post
    I believe a lot has to do with how well your foot compares to "normal" or "average size". Obviously differing manufacturers have different ideas on foot shape/size so Salomon for example might favor narrow feet. My point is if you are a good match for someone's shoe breakin is not necessary, I've purchased several Merril and Salomon shoes, gone straight from box to a week on the trail with my feet 100% happy. On the other hand I've seen many thru hikers still fighting foot/shoe issues at the 1000 mile mark which tells me they either cant find a good fitting shoe or dont know how to tell a good fit. It seems obvious, the poorer the fit the more you must break in the shoe to conform to your foot.
    Some shoes mold better too, but good design plays a role.

    Putting on my inov8 flyroc 310s was like shaking hands with jesus. Nothing else has just slipped into place so solidly and perfectly since. Lacing didnt matter at all. And they held up for 700+ mi

  8. #28

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    Altras? No break-in.
    LLBean Crestas? No break-in.
    Real boots that aren't LLBean Crestas? Break-in.

  9. #29
    Registered User GankenBerry's Avatar
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    i've always just throw on the new ones at the start of a zero and walk around town for a bit then next day, start hiking.

  10. #30

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    Yes I totally agree. Feet get swollen with hikes, especially in summer months (at least mine do) I carry my old ones just in case. I've had bad blisters and do all I can to prevent them. It can ruin a good hike. : )

  11. #31
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    I wonder how non hiking activity affects your feet? What I'm saying is that I've always had jobs that require me to be on my feet the majority of the day. I was very active in my youth, cross country, wrestling, track. And other than a couple small blisters one time when I thought it would be a good idea to take a 10 mile roadwalk on a gravel road in a pair of beat up merrells, i've never had any issues with my feet. Never noticed any change in my feet during or after my thru other than some callouses getting thicker, but that went away after the trail.

  12. #32
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    When you buy new shoes, lets say Altras for new Altras, do you just toss your old ones and continue with 20 mile days on new ones?

    I tend to save my old light wt trail runners because I never use light wt trail runners to the degree they are totally spent. I mail them used back home for lighter non wt on my back use ie; gardening, fishing, etc. As I'm writing this I'm wearing a pr of used HOKA Stinson ATR 4's I did a 320 mile hike that were bought for that hike that will not see another 300+ mile hike. I may wear them on a maintained single track UL/SUL kit fair weather weekend non hardcore type trip. I wear them to work too where I switch off to work boots outside on building sites or other nice shoes in the office. My trail runners and light hikers tend to cost $110-160/pr so $ cost also plays a role in desiring some lighter use under non backpacking conditions.

    Customarily employing lighter wt trail runners too long a duration that significant performance fall offs are experienced raises injury risks. I don't backpack and hike unnecessarily allowing for greater physical injury risks when it's in my power to avoid it...particularly in regards to continuing to employ failing equipment.

    When I do switch out with a new pr of the same brand and model or NOT, but similar in model - light wt trail runner or light wt hikers - I just continue on. I currently have evolved to having all my footwear pre purchased and each pr individually pre hike demoed before the start of the hike. I don't like surprises with my footwear while engaged in LD hikes. I no longer buy shoes during a LD hike that I've never in person previously demoed for at least one day.

    Do you carry those old ones for a few days?

    Never. The old ones get mailed home. I tend to resupply more often than than most to save wt so probably have greater access to mailing opps. AT has mailing opps every 2-4 days. I'm not mail adverse as some here on WB to using the USPS as a logistical tool. Again, those used shoes being mailed home are not in odorous tatters. BTW, I take extraordinary measures on trail to maintaining feet, socks, and orthotics to some standards too which impact shoe life and foot health.

    What problems do you look for buying new ones and doing big miles right away? I'm going from the Superior 3.0 to the Lone Peak 4.

    That's typically done pre hike as part of a shake down hike or at the least a demoing for an off trail weekend period. With your two models this is a question specific for you to answer that includes why you made those shoe decisions in the first place.

    My trail runners and light hikers never need a break in period as I tend to not hike in stiff tight fitting thick leather/synthetic European mountaineering boots. A demo period or shake down hike is not the same thing as a shoe "break in" period for me.

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pony View Post
    I wonder how non hiking activity affects your feet? What I'm saying is that I've always had jobs that require me to be on my feet the majority of the day. I was very active in my youth, cross country, wrestling, track. And other than a couple small blisters one time when I thought it would be a good idea to take a 10 mile roadwalk on a gravel road in a pair of beat up merrells, i've never had any issues with my feet. Never noticed any change in my feet during or after my thru other than some callouses getting thicker, but that went away after the trail.

    Based on what was said "why buy shoes then"?


    Using beat up shoes from my experience is far more problematic than using the same pr of those shoes new.

  14. #34
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    Up to my experience, its mandatory to do some break-in with any new footwear.
    Sturdy boots need more (way more) break-in than trailrunners, but I would never set off for a longer hike using new footwear without either a proper break in, or a backup plan like carrying the old shoes or sandals for some days/weeks.

    Even a change of the trail conditions can lead to foot problems, even for experienced hikers.
    This spring we had done several group hikes in the desert, and one of the strongest and most experienced members, who had done serious Nepal and Alpine trekking before using the very same shoes, developed serious foot issues.
    Obviously the slight change from rocky trekking trails to rocky&sandy desert tread made enough of a difference to cause the troubles. Same could happen when going from dry to wet conditions, or from cold to hot.

    And as many had already pointed out, buying the exact same model of shoes again you still can not be sure your feet will like them from the start.

  15. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by vickietyer View Post
    When you buy new shoes, lets say Altras for new Altras, do you just toss your old ones and continue with 20 mile days on new ones? Do you carry those old ones for a few days? What problems do you look for buying new ones and doing big miles right away? I'm going from the Superior 3.0 to the Lone Peak 4.

    Thanks
    I am not a fan of Altras because I noticed a couple of design flaws, namely the toe flap and side seams that seem to wear out and rip before the treads. I spoke to an Altra rep at the Boston Marathon and he confirmed my observations. The seams rip apart before the treads. I recently got the Xero which I tried out on a 5K trail run. I had to buy a full size up to a 9 from an 8, since all the recommendations were that these shoes run small. Here is the rub, your feet will swell as you hike the miles. It happens to almost everyone. In addition, shoe companies change manufacturing plants all the time...as they get cheaper...wanting to rake in more profits. I am not saying Altras does, but Nike did, so the same shoes might not fit right the next year you buy them. As a runner/hiker, I test out all shoes before I resupply them to myself and/or enter any foot races. In addition, I noticed a LOT of foot problems on the AT this year and hikers blowing through their new shoes within a week! I rather test my shoes out in ALL weather and terrain features to see how it will handle the climate and terrain. One other important note...your feet also changes as you age. Your ligaments elongate and your feet may lose the arch and go flatter. No one has the exact same size in feet either. One foot may be 1/4 size bigger than the other. Sometimes, it is best to go into a reputable outfitter and get properly fitted. Then, you can take that information and get the right shoe for you, even if it's online. Happy trails!

  16. #36
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    In addition, I noticed a LOT of foot problems on the AT this year and hikers blowing through their new shoes within a week!

    That's a ridiculous amount of time to blow through new $120 trail runners. However, having foot and other health issues is common most yrs. NOBO Thrus will lame up around Hiawassee because they went out too fast, too hard, too long: 1) assuming they were more fit then they actually were thinking they were Skurka fit because they read one of his articles 2) have UL gear they not know enough through in person in the field use so it gets abused and in the process sometimes abuse themselves hurting their feet, knees, back, etc. 3) abruptly switch to some flimsier Zero Drops like Altra because Altras are the "in" UL trail runner not doing so to perhaps alter some mechanical hiking traits. IMO, hikers not trying to address running or hiking mechanics or more unique foot traits shouldn't expect to change their feet, ligaments, etc to match "the" current shoe of choice. A hiking shoe should be chosen to match ones feet Not vice versa. I made this Altra mistake out of hubris paying dearly over the last six months. I went away from Zero Drops with no arch support to that which best serves me. My feet and health are better for it. I've been told this professionally by several podiatrists and running analysts. Wish I would have researched more before making the switch.

  17. #37
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    Break in new shoes? lol

    I just "broke in" a new pair of altra shoes. Literally purchased them on the way to trailhead and then did a 50 mile Hut-to-Hut traverse in the Whites. No blisters no problems! The grip did get noticeably stickier and the traction overall seemed to improve after 12-16 miles or so. From average/manageable to "pretty good."

    This worked for me but I obviously wouldn't recommend most people to do this. Most shoes these days do not need much of a break in but I do think you need some foot/shoe time in order for everything to align into place. A new shoe is like a backpack with no weight. Once you add some weight into the pack (or your foot into the shoe) everything can then settle into position. For this, I recommend a couple days wearing them around work/town or a short training hike if you will.

  18. #38
    Registered User Ben795's Avatar
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    My experiences have always been to have a break in period, close to home, on local trail work. All backpacking boots are different. I wear a Asolo 520 TPS GV now, and I have it a few miles to work in. My previous Asolo Fugitive GX I bought in Pamplona Spain, and wore them the first day to climb up a small mountain in San Sebastián, Mount Urgul.. had a blister on each foot. They became a very comfortable boot as they worked in, but doing the hike in brand new boots was a lesson I needed to learn. I would not comment on the new trail runners, and low cut sneaker styles, as I need the support of a backpacking boot. They may be easier to just put on, and go..

  19. #39

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    Back in the 1970's breaking in shoes was critical, or else you developed horrible blisters. But it's no longer an issue with today's synthetic shoes.

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