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  1. #1
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    Default Gear Shakedown Request

    My cousin and I are going to start at Springer Mtn in mid-October and go as far north as we can get in a week. Were hoping we end up at Top of Georgia. I know weather can range from very warm to very cool, so I tried to plan for everything now and Ill whittle it down a bit later.

    That being said, heres my lighter pack list, if youd take a look and give me some feedback Id appreciate it. http://https://lighterpack.com/r/cirewm

    Were going to share things like hell carry a cookpot and Ill carry the fuel.

    Thanks in advance.

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  3. #3

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    You never know about October, let's say from the 15th to Halloween. In the last several years we've had hot Octobers and mostly t-shirt weather---in the Southern Apps.

    In 2017 I did a trip from Oct 19 to Nov 8 and needed my capilene hoody top and my acrteryx rain jacket and saw alittle snow.

    In 2016 I was out from Oct 15 to Nov 4 and it was t-shirt weather and the hoody with no snow.

    In 2015 I went from Oct 18 to Nov 6 and started out in a t-shirt and silk long sleeve top.

    In 2014 Oct 21 to Nov 10 I started in a t-shirt and ended up wearing full winter layers in a Halloween snowstorm.

    TRIP 160 257-L.jpg
    This is the general October outfit for backpackers.

    TRIP 160 293-L.jpg
    For the Halloween snow this is how they were dressed.

    TRIP 160 311-L.jpg
    And after a 2,000 foot hump this is what they looked like.

    TRIP 160 347-L.jpg
    This is at 5,000 feet in late October and shows how much crap I needed to stay warm---merino leggings, Icebreaker merino top, gloves, turtle fur cap etc.

  4. #4
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    My opinion is that you got too much stuff. About 10 pounds too much. When you add in food and water, it's too heavy for me. You have way more clothing than I would take. That is my feedback.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by moldy View Post
    My opinion is that you got too much stuff. About 10 pounds too much. When you add in food and water, it's too heavy for me. You have way more clothing than I would take. That is my feedback.
    Thank you, I’ll look into dropping some clothing. Some of it is because I’m not sure of the weather yet. Anything
    else I could drop?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    You never know about October, let's say from the 15th to Halloween. In the last several years we've had hot Octobers and mostly t-shirt weather---in the Southern Apps.

    In 2017 I did a trip from Oct 19 to Nov 8 and needed my capilene hoody top and my acrteryx rain jacket and saw alittle snow.

    In 2016 I was out from Oct 15 to Nov 4 and it was t-shirt weather and the hoody with no snow.

    In 2015 I went from Oct 18 to Nov 6 and started out in a t-shirt and silk long sleeve top.

    In 2014 Oct 21 to Nov 10 I started in a t-shirt and ended up wearing full winter layers in a Halloween snowstorm.

    TRIP 160 257-L.jpg
    This is the general October outfit for backpackers.

    TRIP 160 293-L.jpg
    For the Halloween snow this is how they were dressed.

    TRIP 160 311-L.jpg
    And after a 2,000 foot hump this is what they looked like.

    TRIP 160 347-L.jpg
    This is at 5,000 feet in late October and shows how much crap I needed to stay warm---merino leggings, Icebreaker merino top, gloves, turtle fur cap etc.
    Wow, I knew it could be a dramatic difference but I was thinking pants vs short difference. Ill see how the wether plays out around Oct 1 to see exactly what Ill be taking.

  7. #7

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    No puffy or fleece outer layer for mid-October in the mtns?? Check the forecast the day before leaving!!

    ETA: average low for Springer in October is 47.
    Last edited by DownYonder; 08-10-2018 at 20:24.
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  8. #8
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    You could probably go with a smaller towel. I don't know what you would need the full size one for, especially for a week. Maybe cut it down some? You can also probably drop the soap and just carry a small thing of hand sanitizer and just wash your cookpot with clean water and your smaller towel. Or carry a bandana instead of the towel.

    In the end I know there are a bunch of things that some people would gasp at, like a pillow and camp shoes, but I am a fan of both of those things and at the weight of the pillow, it's not the biggest item in there.

    Maybe some shower shoe flip flops for camp shoes would cut down some weight. As long as you are comfortable with carrying the weight, use this as your own shakedown hike to figure out what you do and don't need.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by DownYonder View Post
    No puffy or fleece outer layer for mid-October in the mtns?? Check the forecast the day before leaving!!

    ETA: average low for Springer in October is 47.
    I’ll add the puffy, I already had it. Most of this is stuff I needed to buy. Thanks for reminding me.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bohpoli View Post
    Thank you, I’ll look into dropping some clothing. Some of it is because I’m not sure of the weather yet. Anything
    else I could drop?
    Note that you have heard from posters with both higher and lower base weights than what you have posted here, each with their own reasons for carrying what they do. There's not much to go on here in terms of your goals/needs, except that you do say that you hope to get as far as you can in a week. I'll infer from that, that you are looking to lower your base weight to enable you to have the energy to go further in a day than you would with a heavier pack.

    To lower your baseweight, here are some additional ideas you may want to consider:
    12 oz - camp shoes - I love the comfort of crocs after a hike, but if you're trying to get as far as you can, you're not going to be spending much time in these in camp.
    9.6 oz sleeping bag liner - probably unnecessary if you're using the ColdPruf stuff as sleep clothes. Besides, have you ever used one? Tangle city unless you lay pretty still.
    9.3 oz tent footprint - consider replacing with window film aka polycryo. It's 7 oz less than my regular tent footprint.
    6.8 oz - wt. of the third pairs of socks and u/w. You could try just bringing 1 spare pair, washing as needed and hanging from pack during day to dry
    6.1 oz - camp towel - that seems pretty big. Are you sure you need one that big? A smaller one, if sufficient for your needs, would save weight.

    I'd guess you could shave 2.5 lbs or so from your baseweight on these alone.

    If changing out the specific kinds of gear you bring is a possibility, then here are some ideas to shave weight:

    You could also reconsider your shelter. I'd guess you could shave about a pound by going to a 2P, trekking-pole supported shelter. You're already carrying the poles.

    You might save some weight and volume by going to a down bag, or a quilt (even a synthetic one might save some weight). But I'd not go with a quilt unless you have an insulated pad, and the Klymit Static V2 is basically uninsulated. You could shave a 2-4 ounces and get increased R-value by going to something like a Z-lite (CCF) or NeoAir XLite (inflatable). As examples.

    Your pack is 70oz and 65L. A SD Flex Capacitor maxes out at 60L and is about 42 oz. Nearly 2 lbs of potential savings here if you don't need 65L after other weight-saving moves. There are other light packs too.

    Just some ideas that would help lower your weight and thus enable you to go further. That might not be your only goal, so pick and choose as you like.

  11. #11

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    Backcountry.com lists the Kelty Salida 2 as 4 pounds 9 oz.. I'm assuming you and your cousin are splitting it up. 26 pounds without food and water is on the heavy side. I would take the advice about towel, shoes,soap etc.. If you can afford upgrading your bag and tent that would be an easy 2-3 pounds. In my personal opinion, I would not try to switch to a lighter pack until I have dropped some weight in other areas.

  12. #12
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    Tent, sleeping bag and pack all seem heavy to me.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by bohpoli View Post
    I’ll add the puffy, I already had it. Most of this is stuff I needed to buy. Thanks for reminding me.
    If you haven't purchased your backpack, that is an area where you can save several lbs. Osprey, Granite Gear, Gregory all make 55L+ packs for under 3lb which can carry 30+ lbs.. Or you could go with a UL pack but you carry fairly heavy and they might not work well. Others with UL packs can comment on that.
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  14. #14
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    Reduce towel size or do a bandanna that has multiple uses. Clothing carried and what youre wearing should all be able to be worn at the same time unless you plan on a town trip with exception of extra socks and liners. Youll need a fleece or puffy. Ground cloth could be polycro window film (Lowes)or tyvek. Dr. Bonners 1 oz will last your trip.


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    You can wear your clothes in sleeping bag and not carry a liner. Lithium batteries for headlamp are lighter also.


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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by gracebowen View Post
    Tent, sleeping bag and pack all seem heavy to me.
    Yes, that's the crux of the problem. Those weights could be cut in half, for a price. But is it worth the investment?

    22 pounds isn't too bad for basic gear and it can be trimmed down a little by tweaking the odds and ends. Using a 4400 mah battery pack would save half a pound right there.

    I typically weigh in at about 18 pound base for a similar place/time of year kit.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  17. #17
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    Thank you all. I bought on a budget, so the big 3 are here to stay for now. I appreciate all the insight you’ve given and will refer back to this when I upgrade.

  18. #18
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    Couple years ago i went for walk end of oct in shenandoah to look at leaves. It was 95F in day, maybe 60F at night. Hot, hot, hot. Forecast was for 70/35.

    You never know.
    "Inevitably, a long distance hiker must choose between travelling light, and not travelling at all." - Earl V. Shaffer

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bohpoli View Post
    Thank you all. I bought on a budget, so the big 3 are here to stay for now. I appreciate all the insight you’ve given and will refer back to this when I upgrade.
    That's cool. I'm on a budget too. As long as it works for you and gets you hiking that's all that matters.

    I got blessed and was given a very light tent. I don't think my gear total will go over $300.

  20. #20

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    I just did a 4 day,, 3 night hike in Taiwan with some people who carried a lot.
    But they are not thru-hiking.
    They spent 3 hours every morning cooking and socializing.
    So yeah, they had lots of fuel (3X that I was carrying), they all had heavy tents, raingear, footprints for their double wall tents, stainless steel cups and silverware.
    But they had fun. Spent more time in camp than I ever did.
    But that's the way they hike.
    So, if that's your thing, go ahead and carry the chair and the heavy tent with footprint.
    But, if you want to spend a lot of time walking, I would cut out that kind of stuff and the camp shoes and just take what you need.
    But that's me.
    Don't let your fears stand in the way of your dreams

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