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Thread: Tarptent Notch

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    Default Tarptent Notch

    Does anyone own a Notch? I like the tent but am wondering if the trekking pole in front of the opening of the tent is a pain in the ass. Are there any benefits to having a side entrance vs a front entrance?

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    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spfleisig View Post
    Does anyone own a Notch? I like the tent but am wondering if the trekking pole in front of the opening of the tent is a pain in the ass. Are there any benefits to having a side entrance vs a front entrance?
    Another Kevin here at WhiteBlaze uses a Notch year round in upstate New York. Ask him.
    My first 3 tents had front entrance. My two current tents have side entrances. Iíll never go back. Not only is access and egress much more convenient, the cross flow ventilation is fantastic.
    The poles on my StratoSpire 1 are not an issue. I canít speak for the Notch.
    Wayne

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    Quote Originally Posted by Venchka View Post
    Another Kevin here at WhiteBlaze uses a Notch year round in upstate New York. Ask him.
    My first 3 tents had front entrance. My two current tents have side entrances. I’ll never go back. Not only is access and egress much more convenient, the cross flow ventilation is fantastic.
    The poles on my StratoSpire 1 are not an issue. I can’t speak for the Notch.
    Wayne
    I have spent a ton of time in the woods but not sleeping so I'm still trying to figure out what I'll like when I do some section hikes. The front entrance thing seems good to me because when you sit up, your head won't hit the top of the tent because you are underneath the high point of the tent. It seems all other tents that have the high point in the middle, won't give you that same level of head clearance unless you position yourself in the middle of the tent.

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    Quote Originally Posted by spfleisig View Post
    I have spent a ton of time in the woods but not sleeping so I'm still trying to figure out what I'll like when I do some section hikes. The front entrance thing seems good to me because when you sit up, your head won't hit the top of the tent because you are underneath the high point of the tent. It seems all other tents that have the high point in the middle, won't give you that same level of head clearance unless you position yourself in the middle of the tent.
    My head doesnít touch the tent when I sit up in the Hubba Hubba or StratoSpire. Both have side entry. The opposite was true in the front entry tents that I owned. Thatís why I switched styles of entry.
    Find the 3D videos of the 6í model in the various TarpTent models. Youíre imagining things that arenít true in the real world.
    Find a store with tents set up.
    Wayne

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    I have a notch. Agree that the side entrance is nice. I don't find sitting up to be a problem. When lying down, your butt is in the middle so while I sit up, my head is at the peak. My biggest complaint is the floor space is a bit tight, but I've learned to make use of the generous vestibule space.

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    Side entrance forever. And ever.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

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    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmoulder View Post
    Side entrance forever. And ever.
    There it is. And even longer.
    Wayne

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    Quote Originally Posted by Odd Man Out View Post
    I have a notch. Agree that the side entrance is nice. I don't find sitting up to be a problem. When lying down, your butt is in the middle so while I sit up, my head is at the peak. My biggest complaint is the floor space is a bit tight, but I've learned to make use of the generous vestibule space.
    Thanks I was wondering about how narrow it was. It's not an apples-to-apples comparison, but the Zpacks Duplex is 45" wide at the widest point. The Notch is 34". The BA Copper Spur HV UL1 is 38". The MSR Hubba NX Solo is even narrower at just 30".

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    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    And the SS 1 nudges 40Ē and fully rectangular floor space.
    Another feature that isnít appreciated until youíve lived in a tent for awhile: VERTICAL SIDE WALLS.
    Wayne

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    I don't have a Notch but I can definitely answer the question about the side entrance.

    Yes. Side entrances for the win.

    No, the pole does not really get in the way.

    We've had a couple of tents/tarptents with the door at the head end, and they are a PITA in all sorts of ways. Having to contort myself to get in and then back out, not having a vestibule to store gear (or crawling over it to get out), and not having any cross ventilation or views -- all suboptimal, in my experience.
    Ken B
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    Our Long Trail journal

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    Quote Originally Posted by Venchka View Post
    And the SS 1 nudges 40” and fully rectangular floor space.
    Another feature that isn’t appreciated until you’ve lived in a tent for awhile: VERTICAL SIDE WALLS.
    Wayne
    I just looked at the StratoSpire 1 and it looks very, very interesting. Only downside seems to be it weighs 15oz more than the Duplex. I hardly ever read or watched anyone mention the SS 1 in their AT thru hike ramblings. It would seem to me that this tent would be very popular given its size and relatively less expensive cost.

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    Quote Originally Posted by spfleisig View Post
    Thanks I was wondering about how narrow it was. It's not an apples-to-apples comparison, but the Zpacks Duplex is 45" wide at the widest point. The Notch is 34". The BA Copper Spur HV UL1 is 38". The MSR Hubba NX Solo is even narrower at just 30".
    I've done a couple of things to take advantage of the large vestibules. One is I cut a short piece of spectra cord, tied a loop on both ends, one loop has a mini biner which I clip to the top handle on my pack. The other loop goes through the tip of the trekking pole. This way the mostly empty pack hangs from the tent pole in the vestibule when I'm sleeping, freeing up floor space on the tent. The other is to carry a piece of silver mylar coated automobile sunscreen from the dollar store to use as a floor for the vestibule. Doubles as a sit pad during the day.

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    If you think that you can live in a single wall tent, the TarpTent Rainbow and Double Rainbow deserve consideration.
    Wayne

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    Quote Originally Posted by spfleisig View Post
    I just looked at the StratoSpire 1 and it looks very, very interesting. Only downside seems to be it weighs 15oz more than the Duplex. I hardly ever read or watched anyone mention the SS 1 in their AT thru hike ramblings. It would seem to me that this tent would be very popular given its size and relatively less expensive cost.
    There is no accounting for people who put weight as their #1 criteria in gear selection.
    That said, I carried just the rainfly in Wyoming last year. Sometimes I slept under it and sometimes I slept on it. I was blessed by good weather. I didnít actually need the rainfly. I think the fly weighs 21 ounces set up and useable.
    The Duplex is a wee bit heavier.
    Wayne

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    Quote Originally Posted by spfleisig View Post
    Does anyone own a Notch? I like the tent but am wondering if the trekking pole in front of the opening of the tent is a pain in the ass. Are there any benefits to having a side entrance vs a front entrance?
    Side entrance is a big plus for me. Trekking pole is not an issue. Easy to set up. It is narrow but it's light and well made. It treated me well in some tremendous winds and heavy rains on the Colorado Trail in 2016.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bigcranky View Post
    I don't have a Notch but I can definitely answer the question about the side entrance.

    Yes. Side entrances for the win.

    No, the pole does not really get in the way.

    We've had a couple of tents/tarptents with the door at the head end, and they are a PITA in all sorts of ways. Having to contort myself to get in and then back out, not having a vestibule to store gear (or crawling over it to get out), and not having any cross ventilation or views -- all suboptimal, in my experience.
    I'm a fan of side entry in Solo for sure.

    Now put two people in there where one has to climb over the other one to get out in the middle of the night and that changes the equation.

    Especially if one of those people is an old guy that gets up several times.

    But Dual side entry solves that little issue.

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    I have owned a Notch for 2 years and near 300 miles on the AT and I like the side entrances.Setup fast and easy with practice at home and using my sticks instead of Tarptent poles.All my gear fits inside and the vestibules offer up extra space.Light and takes abuse.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Venchka View Post
    Another Kevin here at WhiteBlaze uses a Notch year round in upstate New York. Ask him.
    I do indeed. I have the one with the half - solid inner tent, to keep the wind down.

    I'm a largish guy - a stout 6'1" - and that inner tent is roomy enough, since I can put my pack and boots I a vestibule. With the dual vestibules, it's spacious. Sitting up and getting in and out are easy.

    The usual caveats about using a three season tent in winter apply. Keep the end vents open. Bank snow to windward. Knock the snow off the roof in the night because it won't take the load a Hilleberg would. I've had it on snowshoe trips and been fine.
    I always know where I am. I'm right here.

  19. #19

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    Another Notch owner checking in. What they all said!

    Also - pitch is super fast. You don't have to figure out which end is the head or toe, because it's symmetrical; flop it down, stake the ends, put in trekking pole, stake side, put in other trekking pole, stake the other side, and you can duck out of the rain to finish the interior (which is two velcro loops around the bottom of your trekking poles).

    I used to think I needed a bunch of room inside the tent with me for "stuff", but after having a Squall 2 (predecessor to MoTrail) for a few years and dealing with the front entrance and finicky pitch if on uneven ground (pretty often) ... and needing a large piece of ground to pitch ... and having to scoot my butt back to the door to sit up inside it ... I finally bit the bullet and bought a Notch.

    I have a bag with my misc stuff that has my wipes, pills, first aid and hygiene stuff - it goes next to me near the trekking pole tie out. My book will go on the other side of me by the other trekking pole. stuff sacks for sleeping pad, bag, etc get tossed down in the foot end, clothing bag acts as pillow. Turns out there is plenty of room inside for a single person.

    I didn't order the interior with partial sides. I have, however, camped in some windy spots in sub freezing temperatures, and it is amazingly NOT windy inside the tent. Far less breezy than inside of a three walled shelter in the same wind conditions.
    Perhaps we have an engineer in the house that could explain it - but in my non-engineer mind it's like the wind is traveling over something that's 115 cm tall, with only about 10 cm gap on the bottom, so the amount of wind that passes under the gap is reduced by ~ 90% ?
    Besides, on the setup video, Henry shows how to lower the tent for stormy conditions. I've never done that, but still stay dry inside. It really is a great tent.

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    I have a Notch in my gear closet and use to use it exclusively. I had no problem using it year round, even though it only had netting inside (I had a bag good for -20*). The side entrance made it easy to get in and out of and you can't beat the bath tube floor for keeping the water out. When I started having back and joint problems, I made the switch to a hammock. I still have the Notch for when the grandkids want to go with me. Since my girlfriend's definition of camping is the Marriott, I won't have to worry about buying a two person tent anytime soon.
    Blackheart

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