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  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by colorado_rob View Post
    One other quick note on the permit thing.... I'm currently "on" the PCT heading NOBO (taking a couple weeks off for family matters, hence the quote marks). Heading back in a couple weeks and I want my wife to join me for quite a while, hopefully through CA to Oregon. So, just a couple days ago, from links on the PCTA website, I easily scored a PCT permit for her starting at Aqua Dolce (~mile 460) north to Canada. Meaning, she is totally legal for the PCT section that is also the JMT, at least to Tuolumne (where the JMT branches form the PCT).

    So basically, if you're willing to exit NOBO at Tuolumne (or keeping on hiking on the PCT north from there), this is another way to be perfectly legal on the JMT/PCT.

    Is it like the Smokies where you have to be ending and beginning your hike a certain distance outside the park?? We would really like to go SOBO. Any idea how much farther nobo from Yosemite the trailheads are? Ideally we would score permits for the next trailhead or two north of Yosmite and just head south from there..

  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by ADK Walker View Post
    Probably the biggest reason I would choose Mammoth is the benefit of acclimating to higher elevations. Mammoth is just under 8000' but Lone Pine is just under 4000'.

    Additional Benefits:

    If you need a one-way rental from Reno due to flight delays causing you to miss your 1:30pm ESTA bus then Mammoth is a great option as there is a Hertz return that accepts one-way rentals.

    If you are spending 2 nights Mammoth you would have the time to take your resupply in person to Red's Meadow saving some shipping cost. They do charge a holding fee though as I understand it.

    Since you're already at Red's dropping off a resupply do a slow paced day hike up to the Devil Post Pile and Rainbow Falls. This low level of exercise will be huge in acclimating.

    Just some thoughts. I'm excited for you Blue Indian!

    If you need some more info reach out to Sam in the video I linked above about getting a NOBO permit. He's very helpful.

    Mammoth looks ideal. But if we are going NOBO I'm not sure how convenient staying there would be. I guess if we rented a car it would matter much!

    Thanks for all your help! Im currently in the anxiety stage of this trip, but I hope it all comes together.

  3. #43
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    Don't stress, and don't overthink it. Get a walk up permit for Horseshoe, mail a bucket to MTR, arrange to meet a packer at Charlotte Lake with a few days food, resupply at VVR, Red's Meadow, and Tuolumne Meadows. Transportation to Horseshoe is not a problem. From Yosemite Valley transport to an airport is not a problem. Spend a night at Horseshoe, next day hike to Rock Creek, you'll be fine with acclimation. There's no good reason to start in the middle and flip-flop around, IMHO. And bear in mind that the traditional JMT hike is from Mt. Whitney to the LeConte Memorial, so NOBO is good.

    Relax and enjoy the most beautiful trail in the country.

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by gwschenk View Post
    Don't stress, and don't overthink it. Get a walk up permit for Horseshoe, mail a bucket to MTR, arrange to meet a packer at Charlotte Lake with a few days food, resupply at VVR, Red's Meadow, and Tuolumne Meadows. Transportation to Horseshoe is not a problem. From Yosemite Valley transport to an airport is not a problem. Spend a night at Horseshoe, next day hike to Rock Creek, you'll be fine with acclimation. There's no good reason to start in the middle and flip-flop around, IMHO. And bear in mind that the traditional JMT hike is from Mt. Whitney to the LeConte Memorial, so NOBO is good.

    Relax and enjoy the most beautiful trail in the country.
    +1 on all of this. KISS principal.

  5. #45
    GSMNP 900 Miler HooKooDooKu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blue indian View Post
    The altitude is definitely making me anxious...I plan to give myself 2-3 days prior to actually starting to try and link up with the altitude. Diamox may be a good plan too....Now I need to find one of these travel clinics (Ive never heard of them). I wonder if the CVS clinic would be useful for that
    I think altitude illness is too specialized for a CVS clinic.
    I don't know enough about travel clinics in Atlanta to recommend anything.
    Even the UAB travel clinic I went to in Birmingham didn't seem to have the expertise to fully handle the nuance of a JMT trip (such at the idea of using low doses of Diamox as a preventive). But they knew enough to prescribe the medication and provide the basic appropriate feedback.

    One of the things I wanted that I could NOT get at the travel clinic was prescription strength pain medication.
    I've had kidney stones before, and it's a sever pain that can quickly come up with no warning. Before heading out into the wilderness of something like the JMT, I want to have some serious pain medication should an emergency arise while in the back country. I couldn't get a prescription from the travel clinic, and I surprisingly couldn't get anything from my urologist that did the follow-up treatment on my kidney stones. But I didn't have any problem talking about the situation with my GP and getting a prescription for a 3 day supply of pain medication (enough to last thru attempting to evacuate from the back country. For anyone else planning to do the same, make sure you talk to your pharmacist about how you plan to package the medication and labeling requirements. Based on what my pharmacist told me, it appears that what ever you place the medication in, you need to have those medication labels they normally put on your pill bottle. I packaged my up by laying them flat in a vacuum sealer bag and vacuum sealing them. That way, the pills don't rub together (deteriorating) as they bounce around in your pack. The pharmacist printed me an extra label that I could then place on the pack.

  6. #46

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    Possibilities to connecting with those at home that I've seen mentioned:

    Spot Device: Allows tracking, SOS and a few pre-set messages to let family know you are ok. (I use to own this but sold it in favor of renting a sat. phone when needed)

    Garmin InReach:Allows tracking, SOS and two way texting to those at home. A few different pricing tiers to fit your needs. (I currently own this and think its a good blend of features and will likely not rent sat. phones anymore)

    Email from MTR: Not sure of the cost but I know there is a fee to use their internet for a few minutes.

    Cell Phone: In towns and maybe on some passes. I've heard multiple times that AT&T has better coverage in very limited areas along the trail but you still don't want to count on it or imply to your family back home that you will even have service.

  7. #47

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    "That way, the pills don't rub together (deteriorating) as they bounce around in your pack. The pharmacist printed me an extra label that I could then place on the pack."

    Brilliant move HooKooDooKu.

  8. #48

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    Thanks for all the input folks

    Look like a nobo from Cottonwood pass in mid August is our plan!

    Gonna fly into Reno, take ETA to Mammoth Lakes (meet hiking buddies there) hang for 2 days acclimating, take ETA to Lone Pine and then Im not sure about getting to the actual trailhead. But Ive got some time to figure it out.

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by blue indian View Post
    Good to know. So how do people contact their SO's and family? Phones at resupply? Phones in hostel/motel/hotel? Ive gone thru periods of days without service but never weeks.
    Welcome back to 1995.

    Places like VVR and MTR have sat phones.
    If you want to stay in touch you need to have one too.

    Good luck. As I said before the hardest part is picking your travel options , permit, etc after that it's just walking. Although I reckon you got to plan for a resupply somewheres heading north from Cottonwood.

    Like someone said if you can Day hike to Rainbow Falls from RM that would be a good thing to do. By itself it's nice enough, but it will pale in comparison to Yosemite. For hikers just coming from Yosemite it's not even worth taking a peek at. It's about 3/4 mile from RM if I remember correctly.

    img20180501_121036.jpg
    I've got some plans for early sept. to wander around SEKI a bit with exit at WP . Be my third time on Whitney if work doesnt blow it. Always worth it. One of the most magnificent spots in the lower United States via established trail. It can be a little concerning to hike it by headlamp in the wee hours of the morning, but intuition guides you. I highly recommend being on top for pre Sunrise, and that means by about 4:30 a.m. When I did the JMT I had hiked 23 miles the previous day. At most I got 1 hour of light sleep before packing up at 1 a.m. to head up to Whitney from Guitar Lake area. Because I couldn't fall asleep I really debated about that early start. ( Mostly anxiety about oversleeping kept me awake). But I was very very glad I did when Sunrise came. I wasn't tired till I was down in Lone Pine. That ended up being like 38 miles with one hour nap. The rest of the crowd at Guitar Lake who talked crap about really early start.... I didn't see the next headlight after me starting up the trail till probably close to 3 a.m.. They all arrived well after sunrise. (Which is okay if that's what you want)

    img20180501_115753.jpg

    img20180501_115702.jpg

    img20180501_123322.jpg
    Last edited by MuddyWaters; 05-01-2018 at 05:35.
    "Inevitably, a long distance hiker must choose between travelling light, and not travelling at all." - Earl V. Shaffer

  10. #50
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    Getting both Inyo permits ahead of time was easy..of course was few years back during mid sep and best time to go IMO...


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  11. #51

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    Cool Pictures Muddy. Looking forward to standing up there one day myself.

  12. #52
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    Appears Reno's air service has gone downhill. Especially after Labor Day. Impossible for me to get home same day flying out of Reno after ESTA bus gets there now. Was not a problem a few years back. Had a choice of several departure times on United that got me home same night.

    Dont matter what airline either. Rno - lax-... 3 connections and overnighting is necessary for me to get home on pm flight. That really sucks. But only 12500 frequent flyer miles so that's something. Used to be connections out through Denver and DFW. I see one American flight that could do it prior to Labor Day.

    But on a related note, Fresno's service seems to have increased since the yarts began running from there a couple of years ago. Making the best way to get to seki now thru FAT as well, regular flights all day long. Vline shuttle to visalia, sequoia shuttle into the park. $25 for all together. The late night direct united flight itook to bakersfield before is no longer. They go thru LAX also
    Last edited by MuddyWaters; 05-07-2018 at 07:46.
    "Inevitably, a long distance hiker must choose between travelling light, and not travelling at all." - Earl V. Shaffer

  13. #53

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    As of now, I am going to fly into LAX from ATL and take another flight from LAX into Mammoth Lakes. It was only $100 more to take the extra flight (vs. ESTA), saving me like 8 hours of travel time.

  14. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by blue indian View Post
    As of now, I am going to fly into LAX from ATL and take another flight from LAX into Mammoth Lakes. It was only $100 more to take the extra flight (vs. ESTA), saving me like 8 hours of travel time.
    Thatís what I did....worked well..check out cinnamon bear inn if staying in mammoth...awesome bakery in front but stay at the inn includes a jam up bfast.....assume itís still same as itís been a few years...damn I need to go back!


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  15. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by blue indian View Post
    As of now, I am going to fly into LAX from ATL and take another flight from LAX into Mammoth Lakes. It was only $100 more to take the extra flight (vs. ESTA), saving me like 8 hours of travel time.
    Thatís what I did....worked well..check out cinnamon bear inn if staying in mammoth...awesome bakery in front but stay at the inn includes a jam up bfast.....assume itís still same as itís been a few years...damn I need to go back!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  16. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by blue indian View Post
    As of now, I am going to fly into LAX from ATL and take another flight from LAX into Mammoth Lakes. It was only $100 more to take the extra flight (vs. ESTA), saving me like 8 hours of travel time.
    Doesnt take 8 hrs to get from LAX to Lone Pine. From LAX take the Metrolink train to Lancaster CA. From there take the bus to Lone Pine. Takes about 2 hrs. From LP take a cab, Uber, try a fast hitch, or pre arrange a shuttle. From a LAX arrival to Whitney Portal via a fast hitch I was on trail one time in less than 4 hrs.

    Easier as said to nab a JMT NOBO permit. But, from the get go be ready for the ascent ready to "walk" as you say, and do a light food haul. End in YV. Fly out of Merced, ML, or San Fran. Don't forget if you opt to fly back out of LAX after a NOBO you can spend that 8 hrs you think you're saving on the front end on the back end. Either way youll be paying in time somewhere if you opt to fly in and out of the same AP...no matter the one AP. Don't do that if you're crunched for time. Fly in and out of different APs or just do ML AP. If you do ML AP and do a straight NOBO OR SOBO you'll be taking time on both the front and back ends to get to and exit the JMT unless you enter the JMT from Lake Mary and go through Duck Lake area. That requires multiple permit hoops though.

    Depending on your permit starting JMT TH ML AP may take you more time than you might be imagining, maybe as much as 3 + hrs, before you step onto the JMT.

  17. #57

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    Howdy Folks

    Ive got a clothing top layering question I was hoping yall could give me some suggestions on. I am leaving August 9th. Ive never hiked in this part of the country. I understand the general temp ranges. I'm trying to decide between two options

    1. Long sleeve button up, melanzana micro-grid fleece hoody, light weight puffy, frogg toggs

    2. Short sleeve baselayer, 250g smartwool 1/4 zip, light weight puffy, frogg toggs

    3. Long sleeve button up, 250g smartwool 1/4, light weight puffy, frogg toggs

    My concern with setup #1 is overkill. Weight and space are a concern so I am trying to travel as light as possible. Would the fleece be overkill? Its not a very good active layer unless temps are in the 50 degree range. I would wear this in the mornings and evenings and possibly to bed if its cold enough.

    My concern with setup #2 is that it might not be warm enough. This setup is more versatile but might leave me too cold. I also have a heavier puffy I could use instead of my 8oz down puffy. But that adds considerable weight and space to my pack.

    I was hoping those of yall that have hiked the JMT or the Sierra at this time of year could chime in with your suggestions! Thank you

  18. #58
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    While i love bringing a fleece hoodie to wear around camp and basically live in when not hiking in cooler climates, and to hike in in the early morning, theres weight and space penalty.

    3 is closer to what I use in sierra.

    Long sleeve shirt for sun protection
    Windshirt for little bit warmth
    Long john top 6 oz powerfleece
    Puffy
    Raingear

    Only time I wore the power fleece top was on top of Whitney

    Having to wear lj top under ls shirt is pain if need to wear all, only real difference from using fleece
    Last edited by MuddyWaters; 06-09-2018 at 23:41.
    "Inevitably, a long distance hiker must choose between travelling light, and not travelling at all." - Earl V. Shaffer

  19. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by blue indian View Post
    Howdy Folks

    Ive got a clothing top layering question I was hoping yall could give me some suggestions on. I am leaving August 9th. Ive never hiked in this part of the country. I understand the general temp ranges. I'm trying to decide between two options

    1. Long sleeve button up, melanzana micro-grid fleece hoody, light weight puffy, frogg toggs

    2. Short sleeve baselayer, 250g smartwool 1/4 zip, light weight puffy, frogg toggs

    3. Long sleeve button up, 250g smartwool 1/4, light weight puffy, frogg toggs

    My concern with setup #1 is overkill. Weight and space are a concern so I am trying to travel as light as possible. Would the fleece be overkill? Its not a very good active layer unless temps are in the 50 degree range. I would wear this in the mornings and evenings and possibly to bed if its cold enough.

    My concern with setup #2 is that it might not be warm enough. This setup is more versatile but might leave me too cold. I also have a heavier puffy I could use instead of my 8oz down puffy. But that adds considerable weight and space to my pack.

    I was hoping those of yall that have hiked the JMT or the Sierra at this time of year could chime in with your suggestions! Thank you
    I've hiked through the JMT corridor three times now, once in July, once in early September, once in late September, spilling over to very early October. Your kit #3 is basically nearly exactly what I carried/wore all three times, and will carry next time. I've really fallen for the long sleeve button up thing, very light colored, very versatile, can easily open front when hot (and roll up sleeves).

  20. #60

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    I am also going NOBO from Lone Pine/Horseshoe Meadows, starting on Aug 1. Sounds like NOBO walkup permits are typically available. You might call the Rangers at the Lone Pine office to get more info on the probability of using that option yet this year.

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