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  1. #1
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    Default AT Thru Hike Gear List for Next Week - Target Practice!

    I'm starting my NOBO Thru Hike next week and don't have much time to make significant changes to my packing list. The totals are:

    Base Weight: 20.62 pounds
    Max Pack Weight: 32.3 pounds (5 days of food, full water bottle)
    Wear Weight: 5.7 pounds
    Max Total Weight: 38.6 pounds

    That's definitely a higher base weight than I wanted, but the cold temps forecast for the next 10 days (some lows in the low 20s) have me lugging my 10-degree down bag versus my 32-degree bag and liner in addition to a few more clothes than I would otherwise carry. My first opportunity to swap out gear will be at Newfound Gap. I'll add insect repellent in a few weeks.

    Anyway, my complete list with items followed by weight in ounces and count is below. Please tell me where I've got it wrong!

    Hoot

    ounces quantity
    Backpack
    Hyperlite 55L Windrider 39.0 1
    Contractor bag liner 5.0 1

    Sleeping
    10* down bag w/compression sack 45.3 1
    NeoAir Xlite Pad and sack 12.4 1
    Tensegrity 2 tent, pole, stakes 44.5 1
    ground cloth 4.6 1
    tent repair kit 0.1 1
    trekking poles 20.0 1

    Kitchen
    JetBoil MicroMo in bag 13.1 1
    Kahtadin 4L Gravity Filter 11.4 1
    Sawyer Squeeze small bag+mini-filter 3.0 1
    smartwater bottle 1.1 2
    insulated coffee cup 3.8 1
    2 sporks and spoon in sack 1.2 1
    mini-lighter 0.5 2
    food sack 1.4 1

    Electronics
    cell phone w/cover 6.0 1
    headlamp w/batteries 3.2 1
    PS 100 camera, case, 3 bat, 2 cards 7.7 1
    iPod Nano and earbuds 2.5 1
    InReach Explorer+ GPS/Sat Comm 8.7 1
    Anker PowerCore Fusion 5000 6.5 1
    charging cables 1.5 1
    wrist watch 1.4 1

    Clothing
    Altra LonePeak Mid Mesh 3.5 24.1 1
    orthotics 6.3 1
    Darn Tough Quarter Cushion socks 2.2 1
    mid-weight crew wool socks 2.9 2
    compression calf sleves 1.0 1
    zip off pants 11.4 1
    shorts 8.1 1
    liner gloves 1.0 2
    mid-weight gloves 1.6 1
    waterproof mittens 1.2 1
    beanie 1.0 1
    fleece balaclava 1.0 1
    sun hat 1.7 1
    briefs 1.4 3
    lightweight tights 4.6 1
    fleece pants 7.5 1 (will drop after cold nights)
    fleece long sleeve shirt 7.5 1 (will drop after cold nights)
    short sleeve tech shirt 4.9 2
    mid-weight long sleeve hoodie 11.4 1
    long sleeve tech shirt 6.8 1
    hooded rain jacket 11.6 1 (primary jacket over layers)
    Dry Ducks rain pants w/bag 4.6 1
    lightweight down jacket 6.7 1
    bandana 1.0 1
    wallet 2.5 1

    Misc Gear
    First Aid Kit 2.2 1
    TP roll 3.0 1
    trowel 0.6 1
    foam seat pad 1.9 1
    sunglasses w/case 2.8 1
    toothbrush 0.5 1
    mini leatherman 2.0 1
    small towel and bag 2.2 1
    utility cord (3mm, 40 ft) 2.7 1
    notepad and pen 2.5 1

    Consumables
    iso-butene fuel can 7.0 1
    sunscreen (30 SPF, 1oz) 1.3 1
    hand sanitizer w/moisterizer 2.5 oz 2.9 1
    toothpaste 1.0 1
    wet-wipes 2.0 1
    medicines 3.1 1
    ear plugs 0.1 1
    deoderant 3.0 1
    Q-tips 0.1 1
    dental floss 0.2 1

    Food and water
    food (5-day max) 160.0 1
    water (carry max) 26.1 1

  2. #2
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    Default

    It's not about wrong or right. Dont fall into that crap. Let yourself evolve. Evolve your kit and abilities. These things are not destinations but more like continuous paths ever lasting. Flow into your hike.

    If you consider your carry a bit heavy at the get go allow yourself to postively mentally and physically and logistically adapt. With intention with consideration work your way into your hike.

    Don't be impatient or act out of angst. A thru is going to last months. You have time on your side. Couple of wk's the individual learning curve climb probably will be steep
    Embrace it. It's another part of this journey.

    Don't go out too fast too hard too long. This is more an enjoyable life learning and endurance event not a 100 yds dash.

  3. #3
    4eyedbuzzard's Avatar
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    Tweezers (ticks), Immodium, Benadryl in the 1st aid kit? Just suggestions if not. You have more electronics than I would carry, but that's your choice.

    A lot of people successfully thru-hiked with a lot more skin-out weight. 50-60 pounds was pretty common back in "the day". The weight of the gear isn't what ends thru-hikes short of Katahdin.

  4. #4
    Registered User gbolt's Avatar
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    Hey Hoot, hopefully see you out there. My one suggestion with a ten degree bag is to watch the fleece pants and shirt and maybe go to a Cap two or SImilar base layer (for sleep I assume). But actually, my Pack weight for leaving the Arch is 32.5 lbs with Fuel, Food, water, and Gatorade Bottle, so the weight is what it is. Safe Travels and Keep HikiN^.
    "gbolt" on the Trail

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  5. #5
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Donít give up your 10 degree bag too soon. Lows in the teens and windy above 3,000í in late March, early April is not uncommon.
    Good luck!
    Wayne

  6. #6
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    Dogwood - sounds like pretty solid advice. No doubt I will learn a lot along the way.
    4eyed - I've got the tweezers and Imodium. Thanks for reminding me about the Benadryl!
    gbolt - I'm headed down from Beavercreek on Monday. Sounds like our packs are twins. I hope I'll see you on the trail.

  7. #7
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    How would you like to carry less wt?

    You're numbers are representing 2 lbs of food/day. For a 5 day resupply you're representing that's 10 lbs of food or 26% of 38.6 lbs. Let me say that again. Food alone, not consumables total, accounts for 26 % of the wt you're carrying. Where could you - should you - focus on reducing wt?

    Get that down to a 3 day resupply when feasible and you just dropped 4 lbs...a very noticable 11% difference from 38.6 lbs. Any other item on your list can you lose as much wt?

    Eliminate 1 meal carried going out of resupply by eating it in town before leaving. Eliminate another meal by eating it bought once into resupply. That can save 1/2 maybe 3/4 lb.

    Depending on where you're body is at the start of the thru hike, are you carrying extra fat or body wt right now?, start with 1.5 or 1 lb 12 oz of food at the start. That can save you 2.5 lbs to 20 ozs in a 5 day resupply. Observe your dietary needs not habits. Adjust diet as necessary.

    By adjusting food logistics and not immediately being side tracked obsessing over just gear wt you have the potential to haul less wt. Changes to lower gear wt snowball into this. The meat is the meat...in this game.The gravy and taters is the gear wt.

    Don't obsess over gear. It will come to you. Allow it to happen by putting yourself in the right mindset when it comes to food wt and bulk.

  8. #8
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    And yet we absolutely obsess over the wt of cuben fiber shelters, cuben fiber packs, cuben fiber stuff sacks, titanium cookware and stakes, stove boil times, quilt sleep systems, gram weenie graphite trekking poles, wear constantly dirty socks because we're so wt conscious over carrying two pr of socks, shelter guy lines, mini micro or line loc 3's, 2-3 oz pocket knives, wt of WP shoes...

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    And yet we absolutely obsess over the wt of cuben fiber shelters, cuben fiber packs, cuben fiber stuff sacks, titanium cookware and stakes, stove boil times, quilt sleep systems, gram weenie graphite trekking poles, wear constantly dirty socks because we're so wt conscious over carrying two pr of socks, shelter guy lines, mini micro or line loc 3's, 2-3 oz pocket knives, wt of WP shoes...
    Crap...

    I check all of those boxes.

    However, I have been learning to carry only a little "extra" food than necessary.

    It allows me to eat more freely without rationing food and I do have an extra little something just in case.

    I prob carry 1lb extra food than necessary when going out for a few days.

    Water.. sometimes I don't like to carry much to save weight when water is plentiful. Some days I don't feel like stopping for water and carry more than I need.

    I agree with you, I'm a scrawny 5'8" 155lbs though. And I can and do eat more than people twice my size. Fast metabolism. Exercise routinely.

    Any advice for someone like me on a thru hike who already doesn't have a lot of fat to burn?

    I've been eating cheeseburgers, pizzas, and lean proteins to try and out on some fat before my hike. I haven't budged one bit.

    To the OP. Just be open to changing your gear list as you go. You probably will not need to purchase new gear but will most likely shed some gear.

    All is good, hike and don't be too afraid to let gear go. It was hard for all of us at first. And if it truly makes your trip more enjoyable, then carry it to Maine.

    This reminds me of the 20L food bag I had overflowing for my first three day trip.



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  10. #10

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    Curious how you like your Altra’s?
    Just got my first pair yesterday - Lone Peak 3.5.

    Funny watching YouTube videos of 2018 NOBO attempts...everyone pretty well packs away 2 lbs per day...yet almost all come into resupply towns with lots of food left because of trail magic/angels. Bless these individuals for what they do....but I’d like to think, or my hope is that after 3-4 days on the trail, my pack would be getting lighter.
    We donít stop hiking because we grow old, we grow old because we stop hiking.
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  11. #11
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    @ BowGal - I've been running in Altras for several years now, 4 or 5 different models, and really like them. I love their wide toe box and have gotten used to the zero drop (no elevated heel) pretty quickly. I'm going to start out on the AT in the LonePeak mid-Mesh which are effectively light weight boots that feel like trail shoes. After GSMNP, I plan to change to the normal height LonePeak 3.5 trail runners.

  12. #12
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    Dude, you must have obsessed about this for quite a while. You got too much stuff. Are you hiking the AT or going to a desert island? You will be ditching much of the clothing along with numerous other items within a month. You will be making your pack 8 pounds lighter.

  13. #13

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    Thereís many things you could drop but nothing over the top, youíll decide to get rid of them as you go.
    You can definitely drop weight on food. I found most people donít eat 2lbs of food starting off, nerves and what not. I had to force myself to eat the first week or so. You could get by with 1-1.5 lbs of food. Plus 5 days isnít need,youíll likely make it to Mountain crossings in less than five days. I always tried to leave town/resupply completely full and hydrated, less you got to carry to the next stop.


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  14. #14
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HootG View Post
    @ BowGal - I've been running in Altras for several years now, 4 or 5 different models, and really like them. I love their wide toe box and have gotten used to the zero drop (no elevated heel) pretty quickly. I'm going to start out on the AT in the LonePeak mid-Mesh which are effectively light weight boots that feel like trail shoes. After GSMNP, I plan to change to the normal height LonePeak 3.5 trail runners.
    One more time. GSMNP is not the end of the mountains.
    No doubt that we all start out with too much stuff. Getting rid of a few things probably wonít hurt. However, being cold and miserable does hurt.
    Be warm. Be dry. Be safe.
    Wayne

  15. #15
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    However, I have been learning to carry only a little "extra" food than necessary.

    Are you also willing to carry a little "extra" tent, shoes, etc than necessary? You are displaying some willingness to decrease food wt though. You seem open to it.

    It allows me to eat more freely without rationing food and I do have an extra little something just in case.

    Unless you are thru hiking inside a grocery store you're rationing food. Find the degree that suits you always being flexible to adapt as required. Rationing food means you have a fixed amount not an inexhaustible immediate supply.

    I prob carry 1lb extra food than necessary when going out for a few days.

    Carry only what's necessary. Find what that is for yourself. If it's the AT, food resupply opps are generally quite abundant and massively well documented. Maybe, 1 lb extra food isn't as needed as assumed, at least regularly?

    Water.. sometimes I don't like to carry much to save weight when water is plentiful. Some days I don't feel like stopping for water and carry more than I need.

    Great first reasoning. Don't just base it on H2O being plentiful but also need.

    Be more willing to stop for water to save wt!
    Much water, especially in spring on the AT, is adjacent to or crosses the tread. Take it on the high side. This applies also to being willing to resupply more often to save food and maybe fuel wt.

    I agree with you, I'm a scrawny 5'8" 155lbs though. And I can and do eat more than people twice my size. Fast metabolism. Exercise routinely.

    Metabolic rate is not static. It can be changed. Have you considered a loose but not junk food but not junk food ketogenic diet for on trail burning fats for fuel rather than carbs. I'd pre hike explore this.

    High or fast metabolism has advantages too. Youll tend to release toxins and maybe parasites rather than hold onto them. You'll be warmer [B]maybe[B] needing slightly less heavier insulating apparel or sleeping bag...less kit wt in those areas. Couple this with staying consistently on the move generating heat to stay warm rather than relying as heavily on heavier bulkier insulation.

    Any advice for someone like me on a thru hike who already doesn't have a lot of fat to burn?

    Gave some applicable to you in previous post and added to that here.

    For you it's about maintaining. Maintaining means observing and adapting being flexible.

    There's balancing and tradeoffs that can possibly be wt acceptable. If you do require more food wt balance that our with wisely carrying less water wt. That's what PCT thrus commonly do balancing extra water wt lowering wt elsewhere.

    I've been eating cheeseburgers, pizzas, and lean proteins to try and out on some fat before my hike. I haven't budged one bit.

    To the OP. Just be open to changing your gear list as you go. You probably will not need to purchase new gear but will most likely shed some gear.

    Your advice to the OP can apply to you with food.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    And yet we absolutely obsess over the wt of cuben fiber shelters, cuben fiber packs, cuben fiber stuff sacks, titanium cookware and stakes, stove boil times, quilt sleep systems, gram weenie graphite trekking poles, wear constantly dirty socks because we're so wt conscious over carrying two pr of socks, shelter guy lines, mini micro or line loc 3's, 2-3 oz pocket knives, wt of WP shoes...
    Understand I'm not putting doing these things down as a matter of right or wrong. I've done almost everything mentioned. It's how we go about prioritizing saving gear wt ozs sometimes grams and incessantly rant about gear yet sometimes give less attention to consumable wt when we should allot more attention to it.

  17. #17

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    I'd throw in a nail clipper. (Unless you prefer small scissors and the leatherman has that right?) Short toenails saves your socks and insides of shoes. Short fingernails keeps dirt/bacteria out of them which you could ingest and get sick..from Giardia or food poisoning.

  18. #18

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    I would get rid of:1 spork & spoonCamera and all related items (you have your phone)iPod nano (just use your phone for music/audio books)inReach GPS (no need whatsoever)Anker PowerCoreWrist watchshortsmittensbalaclavahalf of your clothingwallet (just carry a credit card, driver's license, and a little cash in a ziplock)foam seat padmini leathermansmall towelnotepad and pensunscreen (it's a green tunnel)deoderant2 days of food

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by BoogieForth View Post
    I'd throw in a nail clipper. (Unless you prefer small scissors and the leatherman has that right?) Short toenails saves your socks and insides of shoes. Short fingernails keeps dirt/bacteria out of them which you could ingest and get sick..from Giardia or food poisoning.
    Reminds me of a part in Keith Foskett’s AT thru...where an ultra lighter ditched items like nail clippers to save on weight. I couldn’t bring myself to borrow someone else’s clippers. Be like asking for their used dental floss.
    We donít stop hiking because we grow old, we grow old because we stop hiking.
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    https://lighterpack.com/r/7kdpc0

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by BowGal View Post
    Reminds me of a part in Keith Foskett’s AT thru...where an ultra lighter ditched items like nail clippers to save on weight. I couldn’t bring myself to borrow someone else’s clippers. Be like asking for their used dental floss.
    Buy new prs at Dollar Stores or pharmacies for 69 cts. Drop your used ones in hiker boxes or leave at hostels for others. Let others decide for themselves if they will use your discarded nail clippers. Often AT hiker boxes and hostels have partials of rubbing alcohol. Use high proof drinking alcohol.


    Even if you carry and only use your own sterilize regularly by washing with soap, dipping in alcohol or heating metal ones, and drying. You can be the one that keeps reinfecting your nails and feet if you dont.

    Beyond my disgust level imagining using used dental floss.

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