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Thread: Best Dog Breeds

  1. #21
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    I'm just curious to see some if that documentation if you have it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by archie View Post
    I'm curious about this statement. Do you have any data supporting that?
    Very well documented, pure breeds are the most susceptible to congenital diseases such as deafness, hip displaysia, and skin issues. Inbreeding can be rampant if youíre not careful with breeders, this seems to be especially true of SOME AKC breeders.

    Hereís just the first of many that comes up after a quick search. Abstract from a UC Davis study of 27,000 dogs:

    http://www.instituteofcaninebiology....-dogs-the-data


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    And donít get me wrong, there are a few purebred breeds that I love: GSD, Jack Russel, Border Collie, but the stats do show purebreds tend to have greater issues.

    Also, this is one of the reason crosses like LabraDoodles have become so popular.


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    Thanks, I was familiar with that study.

    Always looking for new information.

  5. #25

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    I have always been certain that a small framed GSP( German Shorthair Pointer) would be a perfect hiking buddy.

    This is a good Article on the Subject Best hiking dogs

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    I agree with gambit that a small framed, well trained pointer would be a good choice.

    I don't hike with dogs either.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gambit McCrae View Post
    I have always been certain that a small framed GSP( German Shorthair Pointer) would be a perfect hiking buddy.

    This is a good Article on the Subject Best hiking dogs
    As much as I love my GSP and GWP, I don't think they would make good trail dogs for a beginner dog handler. I am absolutely sure that with some minimal exercise, either breed could handle the mileage day in and day out. My fear would be the prey drive on the trail would cause some issues. My GSP will chase anything from deer and turkeys to rabbits and squirrels, it's in her nature. My gwp will point a game bird and not leave until you flush it, no matter how far away she is. I don't even want to know what a bear interaction would look like. Again, I love the breeds, but their prey drive is a force to reckon with. They can't help it and I love them for it.

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    Scout is a “Potcake”, which is a Bahamian mutt. Like I told folks on the trail, I think he thought it was the best day ever, day after day...

    69F2AF48-DDE2-4254-98E2-CB81229D9CEE.jpeg

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    We are very happy with our Rhodesian ridgeback. Heís just over 1.5 years and can do up to 15 mile day hikes. We did two 10 mile days in a row. Probably more now as this was before winter. Heís ready to run two days after. I can run him 4 miles now and he still wants to play frisbee after. He carryís all his own gear and listens very well in the tent. He was the dominate male in the litter and has been a lot to train and will continued to be worked with.

    We waited till 12 months to do anything over 2 miles with him. Up to 12 months we made sure to only do 1/4 mile at a time with a good break for him. It was surely a pain but so far it has paid off. Also he is still intact which has also helped with his development. Starting slow and waiting till the joints and bones are fully grown is cheap insurance. Getting ready to mountian bike with him this spring. And getting him a sister from the same parents in June.


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  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by molliesmaster View Post
    As much as I love my GSP and GWP, I don't think they would make good trail dogs for a beginner dog handler. I am absolutely sure that with some minimal exercise, either breed could handle the mileage day in and day out. My fear would be the prey drive on the trail would cause some issues. My GSP will chase anything from deer and turkeys to rabbits and squirrels, it's in her nature. My gwp will point a game bird and not leave until you flush it, no matter how far away she is. I don't even want to know what a bear interaction would look like. Again, I love the breeds, but their prey drive is a force to reckon with. They can't help it and I love them for it.
    In my experiences you have 2 very different kinds of GSP's. The workdog/ hunting dog & the family dog. I personally had a GSP that was a family dog. She had the working drive that the breed is known for, but would listen like a well trained lab. She was only about 40lbs which is a good bit on the small side and was very agile. If I get another dog after Ward kicks the bucket it will be another female GSP.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gambit McCrae View Post
    I have always been certain that a small framed GSP( German Shorthair Pointer) would be a perfect hiking buddy.

    This is a good Article on the Subject Best hiking dogs
    Most of these lists are kind of BS, but this one is actually pretty good. Though I think ,the Berner is a lovely dog, but they only live about 9-10 years average.

    Also i agree with whoever said that Huskies are not real heat tolerant. Though for some odd reason they are popular and can do well in New Mexico, go figure.

    Also I think the term "hybrid vigor" is misapplied to mixed breed dogs. Mixed breed dogs are not hybrids. However, they can be healthier due to fewer genetic diseases from inbreeding-- or from breeding in some traits. Some mixed breeds would NOT be good hiking dogs.

    Interesting topic, anyway.

  12. #32
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    When I saw IslandPete's "Scout," I thought I'd have to post a pic of my "Boone." As someone else says, he thinks every day on a trail in the woods is the best day ever. He even found me on a trail in the woods as a dumped puppy, on a 4-day backpacking trip on the Sheltowee Trace in Kentucky, in the Daniel Boone National Forest, thus his name.

    He was so small he rode on my backpack to camp that night. Vet says he's a Rottweiler-German Shepherd mix. He learned very early to respond a command that means "stop what you're doing." On his very first backpacking trip with me while still a pup (after being chipped) on the Chimney Top Trail in Frozen Head State Park here in Tennessee, he rounded a bend ahead of me and spooked some wild boar, which took off like a blur down the mountainside. He immediately gave chase but stopped on my command. He REALLY wanted to keep going per his body language and glances at me and them, but came back to me. I was so proud!

    I've watched him run from side to side of trails, running first to one side, then the other, over and over out of sheer joy, which reminded me of being a boy holding my arms out like wings and doing the same thing.

    Here's a photo of him riding on top of my backpack the day he found me (he was too small to keep up and too heavy to be carried far in my arms). Also a pic of him during a rest/snack stop last year on the Conasauga River Trail in Georgia. He's smart enough to rest when it's a rest break.

    I never intended to have a hiking dog, but he sure seems to be a good mixed breed for starters and on top of that has a great mellow disposition, intelligence, and obedience. All that said, I've never pushed him to hike 20 miles, and wouldn't, especially day after day.

    I have read/been told(?) one thing that relates to breed: if your dog gets injured, can you carry him/her out to safety?
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  13. #33

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    I have a female Wirehaired Pointing Griffon. Shes 50-55lbs

    She is an amazing athlete and highly intelligent. I chose this breed for very specific reasons. Some of those attributes I thought would make an awesome hiking buddy.

    Shes a little over 1 year old and we have logged around 400 miles since she joined my family. About 99% of those miles have been off leash.

    Here are my observations after the first year:

    1. She absolutely loves being on trail. She is meant to be in the woods.

    2. She is good about sticking with me, like 85% of the time. She has never run away but her prey drive is very strong. She will chase any moving creature if she wants to. And I cant stop her, I dont want to. Thats her natural instinct and its not fair for me to suppress that. However, if bond and trust between human and K9 is strong enough and you can get your dog to stop and stay on command, all should be good. But the fact that her prey drive is so strong worries me when we go into the big mountains. We have plenty of trails near the house for training purposes.

    3. She gets over heated very easily. She has a 2 coat layer system going on. A wooly undercoat and a wirey top coat. If its over 65* and she gets let loose, you need to be extra vigilant with her. I worry about this because often shes much more interested in chasing or sniffing to drink H2O. But if I squirt H2O on her belly and armpits it helps keep her cool.

    Overall, we have a very strong start for a long relationship on trail together. But for now, any long distance hike will be done solo. I think when I can fully rely on her to "woah", "leave it", and "stay" she will be joining me for more backcountry forays. When its not going to be hot...

    Shes in one of neemors videos if youre interested

  14. #34
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    I go to the folks who know dog breeds better than anyone.
    http://www.akc.org/contententertainm...king-partners/

    Have owned and hiked with or hiked with these breeds owned by another hiker: Siberian husky(1, nothing longer than 3-4 days), black/chocolate/yellow Labrador Retrievers(many, as long as s couple of wks, have done canoe trips with Labs, popular outdoor and family breed, never a thru hike though of TC length), Irish Setter(1, thru of the AT), Border Collies, Australian Sheperds and these last two mixes(several times up to OR and WA PCT distance), German Short Haired Pointers(2, only long weekend lengths), Weimeraner (1, great hiking breed, day hiles), German Sheperd(2, day and over nighters, one other was a loving faithful companion but his personality and my ineptitude as a dog owner I couldn't go out more than a day), Rhodesian Ridgeback (2). Probably some I'm forgetting.

    Not all hikes, dog breeds, individual dog personalities(dogalities?), and all dog owners abilities are optimally compatible. Here in lies problems when dog owners ignore this. They ceasely try to jam a large round
    peg into a smaller square hole.

    Selecting a dog breed to hike with is only the beginning. I've given this much consideration unfortunately choosing to not hike with some breeds, some dog personalities, and other dog owners. I've owned dogs I would have loved to hike with but the dog wasn't right or I wasn't up to the tasks. I can't teach a dog what I don't know.

  15. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by sethd513 View Post
    We are very happy with our Rhodesian ridgeback. He’s just over 1.5 years and can do up to 15 mile day hikes. We did two 10 mile days in a row. Probably more now as this was before winter. He’s ready to run two days after. I can run him 4 miles now and he still wants to play frisbee after. He carry’s all his own gear and listens very well in the tent. He was the dominate male in the litter and has been a lot to train and will continued to be worked with.

    We waited till 12 months to do anything over 2 miles with him. Up to 12 months we made sure to only do 1/4 mile at a time with a good break for him. It was surely a pain but so far it has paid off. Also he is still intact which has also helped with his development. Starting slow and waiting till the joints and bones are fully grown is cheap insurance. Getting ready to mountian bike with him this spring. And getting him a sister from the same parents in June.


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    Is the reason you waited until the pup was 12 months because of joint and bone development? We are waiting for her to go thru one heat before fixing her for those reasons. But Im afraid she might have done too much as a pup

  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gambit McCrae View Post
    I have always been certain that a small framed GSP( German Shorthair Pointer) would be a perfect hiking buddy.

    This is a good Article on the Subject Best hiking dogs
    Quote Originally Posted by molliesmaster View Post
    As much as I love my GSP and GWP, I don't think they would make good trail dogs for a beginner dog handler. I am absolutely sure that with some minimal exercise, either breed could handle the mileage day in and day out. My fear would be the prey drive on the trail would cause some issues. My GSP will chase anything from deer and turkeys to rabbits and squirrels, it's in her nature. My gwp will point a game bird and not leave until you flush it, no matter how far away she is. I don't even want to know what a bear interaction would look like. Again, I love the breeds, but their prey drive is a force to reckon with. They can't help it and I love them for it.
    This was the case for Gunner a GSP I had. It was as much my fault as a new inept dog owner. He was really high strung just like my brothers male GSP. Couldn't be left in the house alone. Despite obedience school his drive to chase prey was too strong to let him off leash on hikes. One upstate NY pheasant hunt off leash he took off disregarding commands and whistles chasing a missed bird. He came back 30 mins later with the pheasant in his mouth.

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gambit McCrae View Post
    I have always been certain that a small framed GSP( German Shorthair Pointer) would be a perfect hiking buddy.

    This is a good Article on the Subject Best hiking dogs
    Quote Originally Posted by molliesmaster View Post
    As much as I love my GSP and GWP, I don't think they would make good trail dogs for a beginner dog handler. I am absolutely sure that with some minimal exercise, either breed could handle the mileage day in and day out. My fear would be the prey drive on the trail would cause some issues. My GSP will chase anything from deer and turkeys to rabbits and squirrels, it's in her nature. My gwp will point a game bird and not leave until you flush it, no matter how far away she is. I don't even want to know what a bear interaction would look like. Again, I love the breeds, but their prey drive is a force to reckon with. They can't help it and I love them for it.
    This was the case for Gunner a GSP I had. It was as much my fault as a new inept dog owner. He was really high strung just like my brothers male GSP. Couldn't be left in the house alone. Despite obedience school his drive to chase prey was too strong to let him off leash on hikes. One upstate NY pheasant hunt off leash he took off disregarding commands and whistles chasing a missed bird. He came back 30 mins later with the pheasant in his mouth.

  18. #38
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    He'd stay on pt but once an animal took off we missed couldn't get him to avoid a chase unless we had him leashed. Here lies a problem. Some folks don't want to hike with a leashed dog making it tempting to unleash dogs that should be. Then dogs and dog owners generalized lead to a bad rap.

    And, just like other situations dog owners start making excuses and offering justification for unleashing dogs that should be leashed imposing on others.

  19. #39
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    He'd stay on pt but once an animal took off we missed couldn't get him to avoid a chase unless we had him leashed. Here lies a problem. Some folks don't want to hike with a leashed dog making it tempting to unleash dogs that should be. Then dogs and dog owners generalized lead to a bad rap.

    And, just like other situations dog owners start making excuses and offering justification for unleashing dogs that should be leashed imposing on others.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blue indian View Post
    Is the reason you waited until the pup was 12 months because of joint and bone development? We are waiting for her to go thru one heat before fixing her for those reasons. But Im afraid she might have done too much as a pup
    Yes we were waiting for full bone and joint development. I still worry now about running him. We work him up slowly. I wonít do more then about a mile and a half jog with him without some walking and a bathroom break inbetween the next section. Heís very happy and we have a good pace. He only ever limped one afternoon very young and we cut him back to nothing for a few weeks and started over. Hasnít limped since and can do big single days for a 1.5 year dog Iíd say. Although he can be a brat if he doesnít get a nice lunch nap in the sun.

    There are some things online though if you search that say you shouldnít do more then 5-10 miles up to year 3. I am concerned. Keeping him intact is the best move we have made. Iíve never seen a dog grow so strong and healthy. Snipping then causes joint issues so a good rule of thumb is 18-24 months to slay or neuter. But I was told they fill out once more from 24-36 months so waiting till 3 years is also beneficial. Iím unsure of what we will do when we get a female. Iím finishing out out basement so my plan is to house her down there. Iíd really like to not snip her but Iíve never delt with heats and intact males so weíll see.


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