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  1. #1

    Default Plug for Wilderness Logic Quilts

    I spent a ton of time researching "budget" quilts to replace a mummy pad and save some weight. For a long time, I was going back and forth between the UGQ and hammock gear options. I'm tall, a ground sleeper, and wanted something in the 20* range. UGQ came in at around 22 ounces for $225 with the options I needed (55" width, 78" length" and Hammock Gear was about $200 and 27 ounces. UGQ also never responded to questions I had about their quilts.

    I was just about to pull the trigger when I found a list of cottage manufacturers on WhiteBlaze and found WildernessLogic.

    Marty was very gracious, answering about 15 different emails all in a couple of hours. He gave great advice, and I ended up going with him.

    Specs:
    -55 wide, 78 long 20* quilt with fleece condensation bib, stuff sack, and pad attachment loops
    -Mix of 800 duck and 850 goose down with 1 oz overstuff
    -Sewn footbox
    -Total weight 26.8 oz
    -W/O fleece bib: 25.5 oz
    -Bare (no stuffsack) 25 Oz
    -6.25 Liters (6.5x11.5) in stuffsack
    -$167 with shipping in CONUS

    Pros:
    -Great Price (about $40-$80 less than competitors when shipping is accounted for).
    -Fantastic customer service (knowledgeable, prompt replies to inquiries, good advice and flexibility).
    -Delivered in less than two weeks from order (seriously, what other custom made company gets things out this fast?).
    -Comfortable (fabric feels good, easy to roll around in, I was good on my side, back, and stomach under this quilt, fleece bib probably won't be used, no rough spots, etc).
    -Made to spec (for a budget quilt, this had lots of options).
    -Matched or beat all claimed specs (I almost skipped ordering because of the claimed pack size of 8x14. I'm trying to get down to 45 Liters with 7 days of food and 2L of water, and having it show up at only 6.25 liters was a welcome relief. I'll also probably leave the fleece liner behind and save a whopping ounce of weight).

    Cons:
    -Cooler than expected: I used this without the pad straps, and it took 2 hours to overheat at 55* (the weather when I got it). It was a bit drafty, so that may have contributed to the lack of quick heating time, but I'm not sure it would be comfortable at 30 degrees (I sleep 10* cooler than advertised temps), even with the pad straps.
    -The taper toward the footbox is more aggressive than I imagined, 2 feet down from the top it is 51", from 55 inches at the top. It's fine for me (1.87 m tall, 75 Kilos), but if you're larger in the middle, you may need to ask for less tapering

    All in all, this is really an amazing quilt for the way I'll use it. For all the research I've done, there was precious little info about them out there, so I wanted to let people know how great they were to work with, and what a great product they make. Highly recommend. Feel free to message me if you want more info.

    http://www.wildernesslogics.com/main.sc

    Prof

  2. #2

    Default

    UPDATE:
    We got some snow, and temperatures down below 30* F. I took the opportunity for a cold weather test (with straps). In light thermals, and heavy wool socks, I stayed very comfortable on top. Because I don't have a 4 season tent and it was snowing, I set up under a patio roof, which meant I was on a concrete pad, which leached heat through my (un-insulated) inflatable pad. Even with a cool back, I was warm to the point of mild sweating.

    I wanted to update since I was unsure if it would be warm enough, it definitely was!

  3. #3

    Default

    Thank you for sharing the information!

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