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  1. #1
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    Default Enlightened Equipment Revelation

    Hi sorry to spam yíall but I am planning a thru hike starting in mid March and looking into the Enlightened Equipment revelation quilt. Iíve looked online looking for answers but there are so many different opinions I figured Iíd just ask here. Anyways there are options like 20 degree 10 degree, 850 to 950 fill. All that good stuff. So anyone have any experience with this quilt on the AT? Thanks


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  2. #2
    MuddyWaters's Avatar
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    Yes.

    What is your specific question?

    A 20 ee quilt likely won't be warm enough for some nights starting in March and will been too hot by mid May
    Last edited by MuddyWaters; 02-12-2018 at 01:51.
    "Inevitably, a long distance hiker must choose between travelling light, and not travelling at all." - Earl V. Shaffer

  3. #3

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    I have a 20 and 40 EE Revelation, and depending on the WX I bring one or the other (both for stacking when winter camping). Muddy is right on which one to use when. Augmenting with a jacket, liner, etc. gets you a few degrees of warmth and are easy to shed as the weather gets warmer. But at some point the 20 will be too much until the WX cools. Mail drops might be your friend. Iíve used my EE 20 with thermals, wool socks, a Ghost Whisper jacket and Dutchware liner in SNP below 20 and slept great. But have also had bad nights at other times because the 20 was too warm, thatís why I picked up a 40. Hope that helps.


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  4. #4

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    if you are planning a thruhike, and dont already know the answer to this question, i am concerned for your safety.

  5. #5
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    What's the rest of your setup look like, especially ground pad, sleeping pad, sleeping clothes, etc? Quilt temp rating is only as good as the other stuff you are using to sleep in/on. Also, make sure you have something to keep it dry. You will be in a wet environment, and keeping your quilt dry is essential.

    I would email EE directly and talk with them if you are trying to make sense of this...they are very knowledgeable and helpful; but also keep in mind that at this point, if you are going to order one from them, you may not have it in time for your start date, much less to do a few practice nights at home prior to your start.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by dcdennis View Post
    if you are planning a thruhike, and dont already know the answer to this question, i am concerned for your safety.



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  7. #7

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    Just my own take on EE quilts, my wife and I use a double-quilt, the Accomplice, but I assume it's similar in build and quality to the Revelation....

    We bought the 20 deg version, but after using it a few times, I think it's more like a high-20's comfort quilt (I am an experienced single-quilt user). So we added about 3 ounces of down to the central-torso area, now it is good to 20.

    So, I'd say perhaps get the 10, or the 20 and add some down.

    The thing I've learned about quilts is that it is a bit more work to stay warm when the temp is down to the quilt's lower limit (keeping it tight on the sides to stop cold air leaks), but on the flip side, it is easier to stay cool when the temp is way higher than the quilt rating (by being partially or mostly uncovered), if you follow.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by colorado_rob View Post
    The thing I've learned about quilts is that it is a bit more work to stay warm when the temp is down to the quilt's lower limit (keeping it tight on the sides to stop cold air leaks), but on the flip side, it is easier to stay cool when the temp is way higher than the quilt rating (by being partially or mostly uncovered), if you follow.
    ^This

    This is my experience as well. It is also the reason I bought a FeatheredFriends Flicker with the full zip. The full zip allows me to sleeper warmer (easier?).

    Have you looked at the Convert or the Conundrum by EE? I'd be tempted to buy one of those in a 850 fill, 10F version.
    Last edited by DrL; 02-12-2018 at 16:09.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by colorado_rob View Post
    Just my own take on EE quilts, my wife and I use a double-quilt, the Accomplice, but I assume it's similar in build and quality to the Revelation....

    We bought the 20 deg version, but after using it a few times, I think it's more like a high-20's comfort quilt (I am an experienced single-quilt user). So we added about 3 ounces of down to the central-torso area, now it is good to 20.

    So, I'd say perhaps get the 10, or the 20 and add some down.

    The thing I've learned about quilts is that it is a bit more work to stay warm when the temp is down to the quilt's lower limit (keeping it tight on the sides to stop cold air leaks), but on the flip side, it is easier to stay cool when the temp is way higher than the quilt rating (by being partially or mostly uncovered), if you follow.
    Iíve had similar experience with EE quilts, had 2 20* enigmas...great quilt but think rating is alittle off...i recently ordered a 20* HG burrow and incubator under quilt and debating having them add lil extra down.


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  10. #10

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    I've camped with my EE 20* Revelation quilt about 10 or 15 times, more than half of those nights below freezing. I would say I was warm every night, but echo the sentiments of having to keep the sides tucked in on cold nights. I think if I thru hiked, I would want a pretty warm bag for the beginning and end of the trip.

    The EE Revelation is my first down sleeping bag/quilt of any kind (and my first quilt), so I absolutely love how light it is. I've been carrying around the same North Face synthetic bag (maybe 30*) that I've had since middle school (early 80's). The quilt is a world of difference.

  11. #11
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    It's generally hard to receive the full advantages of 950 FP down with a Mar AT NOBO start. It's too humid and wet of a trail in general to begin. If you're new to quilts and have a sleep/shelter system set up that allows further moisture into the down it's compounded. If you don't have a good grasp of what I mean by quilt component sleep systems you should more strongly consider 850 FP in the 10* rating.

    It depends on your cumulative sleep system set up warmth, but I too assert a 20* quilt generally isn't going to be enough warmth in Mid March. That temp rating might work for one having quilt knowledge taking the quilt temp ratings in their sleep system very near, to, or below that rating but it's not very typical.

    Save gram weenieing quilts for later.

  12. #12

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    We did have one single digit night last year just north of the GA/NC border, March 14th. A rumor was heard that it was darn close to zero at the next, higher, shelter. BUT: so what? We were fine in our 20 degree system. We took hot water bottles to bed with us, plus wore pretty much our entire kit of clothing.

    My point is: you're not going to die, or even be severely uncomfortable if your kit doesn't get down (!) to the lowest temps you'll encounter. I use the "2-sigma" method, which is something like 95% for my gear planning, meaning if 5% of the time I'm outside the bounds of my system, that to me is a perfect place to be with my gear. I can handle minor discomfort, usually just minor inconvenience, one in twenty nights.

    So, I do think a 20 degree system works for a mid-March start. But, you need a "real" 20 degree system. I just don't think the 20 degree EE quilt is quite there. Close though. Tough call. IF you get the 10 degree vs. the 20 in a regular length, looks like an extra 3 ounces. Again, tough call. As implied below, it also has to do with your tent system. If you plan on using shelters, I'd definitely get the 10. Shelters are c-o-l-d Cold.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by saltysack View Post
    I’ve had similar experience with EE quilts, had 2 20* enigmas...great quilt but think rating is alittle off...i recently ordered a 20* HG burrow and incubator under quilt and debating having them add lil extra down.


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    Quilts on the ground and hanging require a different temp rating mindset than sleeping bags. Supposed temp ratings for quilts is not just about quilt manufacturer's assigned ratings possibly being a little off or over stated! *Every quilt user, one considering using a quilt, or promoter should get this into their heads - a quilt is a component in a sleep system. This is particularly significant to quilt usage; this highly affects the warmth of the systems.


    I've seen sleeping bags slept in alone thrown on the ground or the floor of an AT lean or tent so many times. I can count on one hand how many times I've seen a zipper less quilt user do this. Quilts are a component in a sleep system more significantly so to realize than a sleeping bag sleep system!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Quilts on the ground and hanging require a different temp rating mindset than sleeping bags. Supposed temp ratings for quilts is not just about quilt manufacturer's assigned ratings possibly being a little off or over stated! *Every quilt user, one considering using a quilt, or promoter should get this into their heads - a quilt is a component in a sleep system. This is particularly significant to quilt usage; this highly affects the warmth of the systems.


    I've seen sleeping bags slept in alone thrown on the ground or the floor of an AT lean or tent so many times. I can count on one hand how many times I've seen a zipper less quilt user do this. Quilts are a component in a sleep system more significantly so to realize than a sleeping bag sleep system!
    I realize this...i tend to sleep cold therefore opted for xtherm most of the time over std xlite while on the ground....As others have pointed out EE being optimistically rated and from my experience would agree....Iíll be sure to compare my thoughts as I use the HG burrow with same rating on the ground.


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  15. #15
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    If one buys a 20* EN rated sleeping bag and they aren't warm enough at 25* there's a shart storm of finger pointing. Yet, when that same person buys a 20* non EN rated quilt and they aren't warm enough at 25* w/ everything else being the same there is a tendency to ignore it or mansplain it away.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    If one buys a 20* EN rated sleeping bag and they aren't warm enough at 25* there's a shart storm of finger pointing. Yet, when that same person buys a 20* non EN rated quilt and they aren't warm enough at 25* w/ everything else being the same there is a tendency to ignore it or mansplain it away.
    Which makes perfect sense, does it not?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by saltysack View Post
    I realize this...i tend to sleep cold therefore opted for xtherm most of the time over std xlite while on the ground....As others have pointed out EE being optimistically rated and from my experience would agree....I’ll be sure to compare my thoughts as I use the HG burrow with same rating on the ground.


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    Prime example.

    Then, if you are opting for a heavier costlier pad(the xtherm over the xlite) because you're employing a quilt rather than the same temp rated sleeping bag, with everything else being equal, to make up for the lost sleeping comfort and warmth does it not make for more accurate comparison analysis to perceive a quilt or sleeping bag as a component in a sleep system?, especially when comparing costs, wts, and complexity/diversity? Is it not more accurate and fairer to compare total sleep system temp ratings, total costs, and total wt? It makes for a valid argument that warmth is lost in equally temp rated quilt alone verse sleeping bag alone comparisons. Well, if this is accurate than temp rating comparisons and assessments for quilts and sleeping bags should also be viewed differently.


    You can't keep moving the goal posts.

  18. #18
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    Originally Posted by colorado_rob The thing I've learned about quilts is that it is a bit more work to stay warm when the temp is down to the quilt's lower limit (keeping it tight on the sides to stop cold air leaks), but on the flip side, it is easier to stay cool when the temp is way higher than the quilt rating (by being partially or mostly uncovered), if you follow.
    ^This

    This is my experience as well. It also the reason I bought a FeatherFriends Flicker with the full zip. The full zip allows me to sleeper warmer (easier?).


    +3

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by colorado_rob View Post
    Which makes perfect sense, does it not?

    It now makes sense to me after in the field cold all night shivering experiences but maybe not to the OP and certainly not to the many with vastly more experience who ignore it when promoting quilt lower costs, lower wts, greater diversity claims and when comparing temp ratings. Again, a quilt temp rating is not the sleep system rating significantly more so to understand than sleeping bag ratings.

  20. #20
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    Isn't this significant to grasp when temps are 20* maybe less which is what can be experienced on a mid March start or when deciding whether a 10* or 20* quilt is sufficient? I'm not really arguing with you CR. It's more of agreeing with you and adding to what you've said.

    Sometimes we can forget not everyone is in the same place. Maybe the OP is less along than you CR or others on this thread in regards to quilt usage in the real world.

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