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  1. #21
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    Float it.

    That was good Scope.

  2. #22
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    If noticing fuel getting low cook over a fire a few nights. For just such ocassions I like throwing into every resupply cook/no cook food, longer/shorter cook time foods, and low boiled water quantity required foods. It's not going to kill me having cold or hot oatmeal for bfast.

  3. #23
    MuddyWaters's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAK View Post

    Has any canister stove user ever found a way to weigh their canisters while in the field, using their existing kit with no extras? I'm thinking of a simple balance scale, using water and a graduated cup as your measure. Could be a fun way to spend some time in a shelter, or at home.
    Yes.
    An enterprising hiker once put graduated marks on trek pole.
    When balanced on a particular mark, with cannister in handloop, the mark indicated cannister wt.

    Then the naysayers explained that msr has marks on cannister for floating it, and that was easier.

    Three times a day for two people? Bring a couple of 8oz canisters.
    "Inevitably, a long distance hiker must choose between travelling light, and not travelling at all." - Earl V. Shaffer

  4. #24

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    When I run out of fuel, well, that’s what Snicker bars are for, but I can guess pretty close to where I’m at by knowing where I been with regards to my cook times.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAK View Post
    Good advice.

    Has any canister stove user ever found a way to weigh their canisters while in the field, using their existing kit with no extras? I'm thinking of a simple balance scale, using water and a graduated cup as your measure. Could be a fun way to spend some time in a shelter, or at home.
    Uh oh. He says he's bringing a balance scale for weighing...ahem, what he calls fuel.

    Become an UL gram weenie. When I'm dialed in rollin with a 12-13 lb thru hike kit 5 days consumables included I can tell to within a burn how much fuel is in a 4 oz can just by having it alone in my hand. Unbeknownst to me after I put my pack down take a 1.4 oz energy bar from my pack and I can tell the wt has changed. Seriously.

    No one has punked me yet surreptitiously hiding a railroad spike or rock in my pack.

  6. #26
    MuddyWaters's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    .

    No one has punked me yet surreptitiously hiding a railroad spike or rock in my pack.
    We once put lead shot in the tubular frame of a scout leaders pack....and rocks n the pack. He was slightly pissed at end of trek when was revealed. He carried a couple pounds for 50 mi.
    "Inevitably, a long distance hiker must choose between travelling light, and not travelling at all." - Earl V. Shaffer

  7. #27
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    The best extra carry punk of all time has to be George Kennedy slipping an Olympia sixer into Clint Eastwood's pack to haul to the top of the Totem Pole in Monument Valley in the movie the Eiger Sanction. Eastwood and Kennedy played it perfectly.

    Still enjoy that scene although the movie was really before my time.

  8. #28
    2000 miler Doc's Avatar
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    My solution is to carry one Esbit tab in my pack. If I run out of fuel I know that I have enough for one more hot meal, usually enough to get me to that next planned resupply.

  9. #29
    Registered User MtDoraDave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BenK View Post
    Yes. Plenty of time to test and Iíve been writing down the time and temp for each boil... also working on the sweet spot of the flame...
    Sounds like you're doing plenty of practice and research. Still, bring the larger one and put a spare small canister in her pack.

    I get about a week out of one small canister, cooking for myself, two boils a day. Coffee in the morning, tea and knorr or something similar for dinner.
    So I bring a large canister. I'd rather not run out AND it's wider - more stable. and it nests in either pot I may use, along with the stove. As has been said, when you get out in the wind, boiling ice cold water, you'll likely use more fuel than your at-home testing.

  10. #30
    Registered User MtDoraDave's Avatar
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    OOps, forgot I was in the ultralight section.

  11. #31
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    I like the float it idea to check how much fuel is left. Excellent.

  12. #32
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    Yes. To punk an ultralight hiker an acorn will do.

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    after I put my pack down take a 1.4 oz energy bar from my pack and I can tell the wt has changed..
    yes, enough time in the woods the mind will play tricks

  14. #34
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    If you run out of fuel there are backup strategies.

    I took a mostly-empty canister on a quick trip a few weeks ago just to use up the remaining fuel and ran out when it turned out I needed to melt snow for water. It turned into an opportunity to practice building a fire in the snow with wet wood.

    fire_snow_01.jpg
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

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