Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 55

Thread: Gear list

  1. #21

    Default

    I have the Klymit Stative V Lite and it has served me well into the 20s, on the ground. I think it's an awesome pad but never tried it in a hammock as I have an UQ

  2. #22
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-21-2015
    Location
    San Antonio TX
    Posts
    410

    Default

    Rather than the Kindle I'd put Kindle app on phone if it's not there already and carry an extra battery bank.

  3. #23

    Default

    Good people,
    I think I may go with a peapod set up with the Wiggys Ultralight center zip and get a Dutch Summer Sock which, in worst case scenario, could add a little boost to my temp rating if it is turned the right way to block wind and also eliminate my need for the ENO bug net later on. Wiggys ultralight weighs in at 4lb (some talk about the variability of Wiggy's weights, so maybe closer to 4.5lb). But, after dropping the weight from my current bag, pad, and Eno bug net, I will only gain about 2lbs extra which I am willing to take for a comfortable, simple set up. Also dropping my Nalgene 1.5L which was 7.5oz and included in my base weight calculation to help cut the load as an easy compromise for using such a heavy bag.

    Anyone have experience with Wiggys bag? From what I read, they are bulky and a pain in the ass to compress. But, there seems to be an interesting cult-ish following and many people swear by them. I got the idea from reading Fourdog's post about diy PeaPods so I know it can work. But fitting a packed 11x20" compression sack into my bag will make for a packing challenge...

  4. #24

  5. #25

    Default

    Still have a liner, which I am not sold on cutting yet, since it could be useful as a summer sleeping option when the Wiggys bag could act more as an UQ than a pod. Thoughts?

  6. #26

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gracebowen View Post
    Rather than the Kindle I'd put Kindle app on phone if it's not there already and carry an extra battery bank.
    Yeah I see what you're saying, but I hate reading for periods of time from a phone screen (like ive been doing on these forums... :-P ) If it comes down to it, I will just cut it and stick with a journal and maybe a plastic harmonica

  7. #27
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-26-2015
    Location
    Northern Va
    Age
    34
    Posts
    263

    Default

    Iíd really recommend a UQ man.

    I brought one and spent maybe 5 nights on the ground. 2 were in the Smokies and the third was when I still had my pad. Two were ****ty nights with no pad indoors.

    But weigh 2 nights against 5 to 6 months.

    Also, if itís below 25 to 30 youíre gonna be cold no matter what pad you use unless you go with the XTherm.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  8. #28
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-26-2015
    Location
    Northern Va
    Age
    34
    Posts
    263

    Default

    Also, youíre fighting getting an UQ and other stuff cause youíre in a budget but the more options you dig up the more you end up spending.

    Youíre about to embark on a half year journey where youíll spend thousands of dollars.

    Bud, spend the money and ensure your sleep system is top notch. Itís going to be YOUR HOME for six months.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #29

    Default

    +1 for the paper journal. The batteries never die, it works after it gets wet, and 50 years from now can still be read.

  10. #30

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Shrewd View Post
    Iíd really recommend a UQ man.

    I brought one and spent maybe 5 nights on the ground. 2 were in the Smokies and the third was when I still had my pad. Two were ****ty nights with no pad indoors.

    But weigh 2 nights against 5 to 6 months.

    Also, if itís below 25 to 30 youíre gonna be cold no matter what pad you use unless you go with the XTherm.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I hear you, man. I can't argue with that. By the time I add up costs of all these different pieces of equipment just to avoid an UQ/TQ set up, I will spend the same amount of money as I would getting the UQ/TQ. You need to understand though, sometimes, it's hard being a silly hipster... B-)

    I already own a thermarest Sol and can bring that along (maybe cut it in half) with a partial UQ and call it a day. And I'd have a partial pad for the emergency or possible ground camp. I've been watching a lot of Shug's videos and see the merit in underquilts and top quilts and that they really aren't hard to use, set up, get a feel for. Down is an awesome material and it's clear as day why almost all serious backpackers use it.

    But Wiggys, man.... LOL I have been laughing my rear end off reading threads about them and the hilarious hell bent Wiggys owners and even coming across a couple threads where Jerry comes in for the kill to tell you you're an idiot. There's something so beautiful about it. No one wants to admit that they are good, because they know some crazy Wiggys owner is waiting in the wings to fight for their right to Wiggy!

    I really like the idea of pods. Maybe one day I'll own an actual Speer peapod and will be satiated. I really do appreciate the words of advice, Shrewd. Not everyone wants to put up my bs. You're a good man.

  11. #31
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-26-2015
    Location
    Northern Va
    Age
    34
    Posts
    263

    Default

    Iím from philly, I can appreciate a hipster, even if I wonít drink a PBR.

    Iíd never heard of wiggys but after checking out the website I canít help but scoff. The only picture of it being used in a hammock was crap; the hammock is so tight itís practically a bridge hammock and heís not laying on an angle. Iíd be curious to see more but it seems like a gimmick to me. There are plenty of people who have comfortably camped in a hammock with a pad. My buddy did the whole way with a neoair and a warbonnet Blackbird.
    I didnít enjoy the same
    Combo, but he swore by it.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  12. #32

    Default

    Get the UQ/TQ combo and then carry a very light half CCF pad you can use as a sit-pad and in emergencies you can sleep on it. I carry one for my dogs...if I'm hammocking and have to go to ground they donate it to my cause!

  13. #33

    Default

    Depends on season but like others have said, if you are going to hammock the trail, spring for the UQ. The hammock is a compromise otherwise.... I carried a TR xlite womens mattress (just the right length for a 6' person going UL) "just in case" and never ended up using it on any of my section hikes. I can swap out the 20 degree UQ and TQ for a Loco Libre Operator set that's rated for 50 degrees in warmer weather saving a couple of pounds.

    My list after lot's of trial and error for balancing weight and comfort (more important as I age ungracefully).

    https://lighterpack.com/r/6nqnxq

    JM2C

  14. #34
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-01-2013
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    633

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Singerdinger View Post
    Hey y'all, thought I'd post my gear list for some feedback. Feeling pretty good about it. Thinking base weight will be 16-17lb after the rest of my uncalculated weights are added. Anything I'm missing or should change? Slap me silly! Anything with '??' I'm still on the fence about. Thanks!
    ...Shelter:
    ENO Doublenest {1lb 3oz}
    ...
    HammockGear Quest Hex Tarp {13oz}
    ...
    ENO bug net {1lb} (too heavy i know but borrowing from a friend to save a lil $$)
    ...Big Agnes 15* down {2lb 7oz} (ive slept in it every night for the past 1.5 years-- has a couple tears and some compression. I consider it a 25*)

    ...

    ...
    Pad:
    Thermarest NeoAir xLite - regular {12oz)

    ...
    Singerdinger,

    What is your camping experience with this set-up? I could make due on a mild weather weekend with the above but for long distance-hike or extended outdoors adventure you need more suitable shelter.

    The ENO DN is too short to allow a comfortable lay. Many better gathered-end hammocks from which to choose. Do not consider anythind less than 10" long. Note: a longer hammock will also require a better bug-net. I like the Butt-in-a-sling Buginator on my Wilderness Logics LightOwl. Not only considerably more comfortable but more compact and lighter than the ENO option.

    Your tarp should have doors. You can add door accessories or improvise wind protection on the fly or, you can be realistic on the front end and plan for less than perfect weather. The Warbonnet Superfly is the most popular and arguably the best value hammock tarp with doors.

    A sleeping bag with pad will work but, is a major pain in the arse. Invest in a set of 20* quilts. Twenty-degree quilts will provide the safest range of insulation so if you can afford just one set make it 20*. If you can swing it, swap out the 20* underquilt for 40* as night-time temps allow to reduce weight and bulk.

    My own hammock experience started with everything you have listed above (though my tarp was the ENO ProFly). Every item was replaced because of specific bad experiences and equipment inadequacies. It will not be inexspensive to replace your entry level items but, the investment will increase the likelihood that you will acheive your hiking goals.


    Good Luck

  15. #35
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-15-2008
    Location
    Randolph, NH
    Posts
    9,761
    Images
    34

    Default

    The simple solution to all this is just buy a nice 2 pound tent and be done with it. You can use the bag/liner/pad you got now. Switch over to the hammock when it gets hot and you don't need all the accessories to keep warm.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  16. #36
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-26-2015
    Location
    Northern Va
    Age
    34
    Posts
    263

    Default

    Thatís not a bad idea really, unless youíre committed to the hammock like (I totally am).

    I agree with the comments above about ENOs.

    How tall are you, by the way?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  17. #37

    Default

    Well I just "caved" and did what I probably should've done a couple months back when I decided to commit to the hammock....

    Now the proud owner of (when it arrives):
    HG Econ Burrow 20 w/ 55" width and snaps
    HG Econ Incubator 20
    WB Traveler XL w/ whoopie sling ridgeline
    Dutch Summer Sock w/ zipper

    Will most likely cut my thermarest Sol in half and bring it as a sit pad/emergency sleeping pad.

    And will be returning the NeoAir to REI.

    Let the fun begin!

    Note: I still have dreams about being a Wiggys guy

  18. #38

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Shrewd View Post
    Thatís not a bad idea really, unless youíre committed to the hammock like (I totally am).

    I agree with the comments above about ENOs.

    How tall are you, by the way?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I'm right at 6' and 150lbs

  19. #39

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    The simple solution to all this is just buy a nice 2 pound tent and be done with it. You can use the bag/liner/pad you got now. Switch over to the hammock when it gets hot and you don't need all the accessories to keep warm.
    I think hammocking is really well suited to East coast (esp AT) hiking. When I'm ready for a ling term adventure out west, I will become a tent man.

    I also have an 8' diameter yurt I built when I'm in places w/o trees when car camping or aren't long distance hiking :-P

  20. #40
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-26-2015
    Location
    Northern Va
    Age
    34
    Posts
    263

    Default

    Is your traveler an 11 footer? Iíve found that to be pretty important, being 6í3


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •