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  1. #21
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    You can get American made bamboo poles that are lite and fixed. Keep in mind that they can't be carry on for air ravel.
    Everything is in Walking Distance

  2. #22
    Registered User JJ505's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bamboo bob View Post
    You can get American made bamboo poles that are lite and fixed. Keep in mind that they can't be carry on for air ravel.
    I made a hiking stick out of bamboo and it was not especially light, and I bought one made of sassafras, very light, but carbon fiber is MUCH lighter. I can't always use both trekking poles--but the weight is definitely better and easier. But you are definitely right, you aren't getting on any plane with them.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by bamboo bob View Post
    You can get American made bamboo poles that are lite and fixed. Keep in mind that they can't be carry on for air ravel.
    I made my own bamboo hiking stick years ago using a bicycle grip and a rubber cane bottom. I think I have some pics of it---

    32 Mitten at the Pine Reststop, South Fork-XL.jpg
    Here is Little Mitten on the South Fork trail showing my bamboo stick on the left and my homemade (and painted stick) on the right. (Wrapped with spare duct tape of course).

    38 The Start of the Nutbuster Trail on Slickrock Creek-XL.jpg
    This pic shows my bamboo stick at the beginning of the Nutbuster trail in Slickrock wilderness.

    another nice fotogsss ritz 2-L.jpg
    Hiking sticks in action!! Me holding bamboo and Mitten with a homemade stick.

  4. #24
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    thanks for all the advice, I'm going to make this pair permanent since I already started the process but I'm looking into some new collapsible ones for the AT as hitching is a valid point. I may look into a set of fixed poles in the future for shorter hikes after my thru.

    right now I'm liking the Black Diamond 'Trail Pro' poles

  5. #25
    Registered User JJ505's Avatar
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    Foldable ones are nice (scary sometimes with how they "jump" into position), nice and packable, but of course, you have to get them sized properly.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by LazyLightning View Post
    thanks for all the advice, I'm going to make this pair permanent since I already started the process but I'm looking into some new collapsible ones for the AT as hitching is a valid point. I may look into a set of fixed poles in the future for shorter hikes after my thru.

    right now I'm liking the Black Diamond 'Trail Pro' poles
    Stay away from the carbon BD Z poles if your a bigger guy...I snapped one on first trip several years ago.....very happy w BD carbon corks w flick locks.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  7. #27
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    Very nice, cmoulder. Bamboo poles used to be standard for cross country ski poles and they were pretty light and strong. My poles from carbon golf shafts are very light; if you're heavy or often put lots of weight on them I don't know if they are strong enough. cmoulders look stronger. Also, if you're tall it is hard to find golf shafts long enough.

  8. #28
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    Default Ski Poles

    I use an old pair of Scott ski poles with breakaway grips that I've had since I was a kid. They are bomb proof. They've got miles and miles on the slopes and later in life, miles and miles on the trails. I like the breakaway grips because I often hike with my hands gripping the tops of the poles and letting the poles pivot forward on my little fingers. (Also a cinch to hang on tree limbs, etc.)

    I added landscaping sprinkler system male adapters to the ends. (either 1/2" or 3/4"... can't remember 'cause I put them on prior to my 2006 AT hike. They've been on ever since.) I slipped on Waxman-type rubber chair or table leg tips over the threaded ends. They were fine except on wet leaves or ice, but they wore out rather quickly on rocky trails.

    Then one day, years ago, I found an old pair of crutches. The rubber tips (boots) were brand new. I stuck them on the ends on my Scott's. It's true that I haven't hiked the miles I did in the past, but those durable boots are still on there and still in very good shape. They are made to take a beating.

    Ski poles are obviously not collapsible, but I've never encountered a problem getting them anywhere. I certainly admit that they are heavier than the poles of today's standards. So? I also say honestly that they have never once failed me... Like when vaulting over those streams that are just a bit too wide to jump across, or putting all my weight on one of them as I crawl down off of steep ledge, etc.

    I have purchased a number of the big-box store poles for example, for elderly friends to keep in their cars for when it's icy, and for others going on day hikes with me. They're fine. But when I'm going hiking, I take my Scott's... I don't leave home without them.
    When you get to those unexpected situations in life where it’s difficult to figure something out, just ask yourself, “What would MacGyver do?”
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    Rickles McPickles

  9. #29
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    About 'voiding the warrantee' A couple of times I had to make field repairs on such gear that failed. I never had a issue returning it saying that it was done as a field repair. It actually is more evidence of the failure that such a corrective effort had to be used to make it work because of their faulty product.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Starchild View Post
    About 'voiding the warrantee' A couple of times I had to make field repairs on such gear that failed. I never had a issue returning it saying that it was done as a field repair. It actually is more evidence of the failure that such a corrective effort had to be used to make it work because of their faulty product.
    Same here, and I rarely let a warranty stand in the way of modifying a product to better suit my preferences.
    UL, because nobody ever asks "How can I make my pack heavier?"

  11. #31
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    My wife's uncle gave us some hiking sticks a few years back, that he made from saguaro cactus wood. failrly light and flexible for what they are. Prob similar to bamboo......but probably not what the OP was after.

    i'd think the golf shaft idea is probably the lightest option.

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