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  1. #1
    Registered User Bearded_Shrek's Avatar
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    Question Active sleepers with liners

    I'm on the fence about a liner and was curious how other active sleepers slept with a liner.

  2. #2

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    I don't. I can't stand them because I get all tangled up in them.

    Why do you want a liner? If for warmth and/or cleanliness, just wear some sleeping socks and a nice layer of long underwear top and bottom to be warmer and keep you bag cleaner. For more warmth, but on more cloths.

    Some people really like liners. It's really a personal thing.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  3. #3
    Registered User Lyle's Avatar
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    I always use a silk liner. Keeps the bag cleaner, more so than just wearing long johns (plus it's lighter weight), eliminates drafts as I toss and turn, adds a small amount of warmth, and can be used independently of the bag on warm nights.

    I turn from side to side many times through the night, the liner actually makes it easier. I use the sleeping bag as a quilt, as I turn, the silk liner stays with my body and turns underneath the sleeping bag.

  4. #4
    Registered User KDogg's Avatar
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    I can't do sleeping bags (I use a quilt) because I feel too confined. A liner, however, worked well for me and was a nice extra layer for my sleep system. I bought a sea-to-summit model that was treated with permethrin. It was very stretchy and moved with me easily when I tossed and turned. I never felt like I was tangled up in it. The fabric it was made of didn't bind at all on my pad so maybe that is key?

  5. #5
    Registered User hikermiker's Avatar
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    I have only used a liner a few times. I get massively tangled up in them and trying to get out in the middle of the night is a PITA.

  6. #6
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    I used a Cocoon silk liner, I toss and turn all night but it still works for me.

    Adds warmth to the bag in winter
    Can be used in the summer alone to keep cool at night.
    Helps keeps the bag clean.
    Easier to wash then the bag, especially on a thru-hike.
    Weighs 4 - 5 ounces
    "Chainsaw" GA-ME 2011

  7. #7
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    I don't know what people who say they get all tangled up in a liner are doing wrong. I've never had an issue and I roll from side to side frequently too. The only issue is getting back into it after getting up to pee in middle of the night.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  8. #8
    Registered User DownEaster's Avatar
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    There are two different schools of thought of what makes for a comfortable sleeping bag. One school holds that you need enough room to turn inside the bag and not get twisted up in the process. The other school holds that you wear a sleeping bag like you wear a sock, and the bag turns with you. With a hooded mummy bag that means you won't turn your face into the hood and dump your moist exhalations inside the bag. This latter way of thinking works for me, so I find Marmot's "body mapped" design both weight-efficient and comfortable. I'm a side sleeper, actively switching from left to right during the night, and I wear the Cocoon ripstop silk mummy liner and Cloudbreak 30 bag like two layers of clothing.

  9. #9
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    my hiking partner cut a neck hole, two arm holes and sewed those down for me. now my liner fits like a nightgown and never gets tangled. it was a great project one night in the tent!

    .com

  10. #10

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    Too much bunching up. You could try safety pins but I tore them out. Big ones might help and a sleeping bag tie down. I use the sleeping pad cord locks on all my bags. That helps a lot to keep my bag zipper oriented. The liner getting bunched up and the bag rolled another way and you can't get to the zipper because the liner is in the way and you start freaking out ' cause you have to piss so bad and you kick the whole damn thing off. Then you come back and have to rearrange it and all the heat is gone from your bag and you try laying still so it doesn't happen again and you finally fall asleep only having to wake up again a few more times and repeat.

    Some people like 'em though and some can fall asleep on their back.
    "Sleepy alligator in the noonday sun
    Sleepin by the river just like he usually done
    Call for his whisky
    He can call for his tea
    Call all he wanta but he can't call me..."
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  11. #11
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    I got tangled up. Claustrophobia kicked in. I use silk longies.

  12. #12
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    Pretty obvious by now that...it depends (on how it works for you) .
    I too get tangled up so prefer to go the T shirt /long johns liner socks way.
    At home I sleep naked even in winter. Can't stand wearing clothes in bed at home.
    BTW, it is important that your night clothes are clean and dry, otherwise you will be cold and or uncomfortable.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bearded_Shrek View Post
    I'm on the fence about a liner and was curious how other active sleepers slept with a liner.
    I use a JRB fleece liner in my hammock every night.

    I can't sleep without it.

    It also extends the warmth of the TQ by 10

    I will cut gear weight in other places to incorporate it in my pack.

    Every time I try and sleep without it I regret it.

    I may give the Cocoon Silk liner a shot too.
    Last edited by Vanhalo; 01-13-2018 at 22:40.

  14. #14
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    Some key factors I've found as one who uses a mummy liner inside thermally efficiently cut mummy sleeping bags and quilts as a toss and turner starting off on my back and going from side to side all night:



    1) rip stop silk and Sea to Summit(C2S) or Cocoon polyester mummy liners are less "grabby" than cotton, merino, flannel, fleece, and brushed material liners. Also, the weave count and thread size plays a role. If anticipating purchasing a synthetic Cocoon liner I suggest their micro fiber model. http://www.cocoon.at/products/index....mummyliners_en



    2) what one wears, or if they wear anything, as their outer layer inside a liner has an affect on the "grabbiness" of a liner



    3) how one sleeps - what sleep position affects the "grabbiness" factor. For example, even though two people are rotisserie sleepers or side to side sleepers one might have a different experience because one sleeps on their side in a tighter fetal position than a side sleeper who stretches out long ways and so turns this way. I stretch out long ways and when I turn my legs are both stretched out equally not bringing a knee further up which will increase the "grabbiness factor." Also, one who rotates all night from stomach to side to back might be at higher odds of having a "grabbiness" issue too.




    4) All liners aren't the same. Some are a wider cut; some have stretch side panels that allow one to move more freely. For example, the Sea to Summit Premium Silk Travel Liner is specifically designer with toss and turners in mind. It's made with integrated polyester/Lycra stretch side panels allowing the liner to move with you as you roll, turn and curl up. http://www.seatosummitusa.com/produc...o2=0&o3=111-34


    5) how clean one keeps themselves and the interior of the sleeping bag/quilt affects how grabby the liner will be. For example, if one is super grungy, sweaty, wet, or their gear becomes that way it results in a tackiness with the liner. This can occur in sleeping bags and quilts when a liner isn't used as well.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Some key factors I've found as one who uses a mummy liner inside thermally efficiently cut mummy sleeping bags and quilts as a toss and turner starting off on my back and going from side to side all night:



    1) rip stop silk and Sea to Summit(C2S) or Cocoon polyester mummy liners are less "grabby" than cotton, merino, flannel, fleece, and brushed material liners. Also, the weave count and thread size plays a role. If anticipating purchasing a synthetic Cocoon liner I suggest their micro fiber model. http://www.cocoon.at/products/index....mummyliners_en



    2) what one wears, or if they wear anything, as their outer layer inside a liner has an affect on the "grabbiness" of a liner



    3) how one sleeps - what sleep position affects the "grabbiness" factor. For example, even though two people are rotisserie sleepers or side to side sleepers one might have a different experience because one sleeps on their side in a tighter fetal position than a side sleeper who stretches out long ways and so turns this way. I stretch out long ways and when I turn my legs are both stretched out equally not bringing a knee further up which will increase the "grabbiness factor." Also, one who rotates all night from stomach to side to back might be at higher odds of having a "grabbiness" issue too.




    4) All liners aren't the same. Some are a wider cut; some have stretch side panels that allow one to move more freely. For example, the Sea to Summit Premium Silk Travel Liner is specifically designer with toss and turners in mind. It's made with integrated polyester/Lycra stretch side panels allowing the liner to move with you as you roll, turn and curl up. http://www.seatosummitusa.com/produc...o2=0&o3=111-34


    5) how clean one keeps themselves and the interior of the sleeping bag/quilt affects how grabby the liner will be. For example, if one is super grungy, sweaty, wet, or their gear becomes that way it results in a tackiness with the liner. This can occur in sleeping bags and quilts when a liner isn't used as well.
    What's your thoughts on this liner from Dutch?

    https://dutchwaregear.com/product/quilt-liner/

    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by fastfoxengineering View Post
    What's your thoughts on this liner from Dutch?

    https://dutchwaregear.com/product/quilt-liner/

    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk
    Or you could buy 2 yards for $20

    https://dutchwaregear.com/product/argon-67/

    I tried this with Argon 90 but I realized after the fact that Argon 67 was softer.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by fastfoxengineering View Post
    What's your thoughts on this liner from Dutch?

    https://dutchwaregear.com/product/quilt-liner/

    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk

    I have never slept in an Argon 67 quilt or liner. However, I have seen and felt Dutch's .67 product. My guess it would be it's soft and slippery and could make for an acceptable liner. Others do make it work with rave reviews. Again, it depends on how one sleeps and gears up that factors into it.

    For example, as a ground dweller using a liner with a sleeping bag or quilt I have little issue. Take that same exact gear scenario and conditions in a hammock I have a tendency to get tangled up in the liner as a side to side sleeper. AND, it may not be the gears fault. It could be something about my ignorance.

    I gave my above 3 cts because I don't just want to hear the opinions of others about how good a liner is or isn't
    taking them at face value. I want to know the why's, how's, under what scenarios, etc opinions are being proffered.

  18. #18
    Registered User egilbe's Avatar
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    Be more efficient t to get a warmer sleeping bag or quilt.

  19. #19

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    My liner ended up in a hiker box in Hot Springs. I couldn't stand the way it tangled around my legs.

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