Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 21 to 34 of 34

Thread: Hitchhiking

  1. #21
    Hiker bigcranky's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-22-2002
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Age
    55
    Posts
    7,656
    Images
    296

    Default

    I'm an older male and when I hitch it's either solo, with my spouse, or with my (older male) hiking partner. I really don't see enough differences to make some sort of rule -- it can take 2 minutes or an hour. More depends on how busy the road is -- it needs to have a fair amount of traffic but not so much that it's hard for people to stop. And then, as noted above, be careful where you stand with your thumb out (at the beginning of a safe turnout is best) and make eye contact with the drivers.
    Ken B
    'Big Cranky'
    Our Long Trail journal

  2. #22

    Default

    Do they arrest you?
    Or just tell you to stop.
    I thought Wyoming was the only state that outlawed it.
    Go figure.
    3 hiking states banning it.
    What's next?
    Don't let your fears stand in the way of your dreams

  3. #23
    Registered User SoaknWet's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-14-2017
    Location
    Washington,Pa
    Age
    68
    Posts
    31

    Default

    Ultralight packable scooters!

  4. #24
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-04-2013
    Location
    Virginia and Louisiana
    Posts
    3,616

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fiddlehead View Post
    Do they arrest you?Or just tell you to stop. I thought Wyoming was the only state that outlawed it. Go figure. 3 hiking states banning it. What's next?
    It is at least frowned upon in most national parks as well. I was hitching near Tuolumne in September and had my thumb out at an approaching SUV. Realized it was a ranger too late ... he stopped and gave me a ride to the eastern border of the park and advised that I stand outside the park gate to hitch another ride to Lee Vining. Maybe hitching at a truck stop on the NJ turnpike would result in different problems but interpretation varies ...

  5. #25

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by peakbagger View Post
    In NH I believe hikers can ride in the back of my truck without seatbelts but dogs need to be restrained.
    That's another reason to like New Hampshire.

    i hitchhiked a lot when I was in the Air Force (from Washington, D.C.. to upstate NY several times in winter). I made and carried with me, a couple of signs that said "North, South, East, West" and never waited for more than ten or fifteen minutes. The signs helped. Of course, back then (Vietnam era), I dressed in my Air Force uniform which was a double edged sword. Either you got spit at (it happened more than once), or you got a ride because they felt sorry for you.

    i do have to chuckle how much times have changed with regard to military service. These days if people find out that I was in the Air Force years ago, they fall over themselves thanking me for my service.

  6. #26

    Default

    I meet a guy who got a ticket for "occupying space" by an Ohio State Police trooper. He showed me the ticket. He was hitching at an entrance ramp to the interstate which got him in trouble.

    I spent a summer in Yellowstone and hitched around the park a lot. Mostly got rides from park employees. Even one of the tour buses. Best ride was with a Korean family doing a tour of the US "before going home forever" after working here for a couple of years on some job. I played tour guide for the duration of the ride from Mammoth Springs to Old Faithfull. But this was way back in 1985.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  7. #27
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-16-2011
    Location
    On the trail
    Posts
    3,575
    Images
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    I meet a guy who got a ticket for "occupying space" by an Ohio State Police trooper. He showed me the ticket. He was hitching at an entrance ramp to the interstate which got him in trouble.

    I spent a summer in Yellowstone and hitched around the park a lot. Mostly got rides from park employees. Even one of the tour buses. Best ride was with a Korean family doing a tour of the US "before going home forever" after working here for a couple of years on some job. I played tour guide for the duration of the ride from Mammoth Springs to Old Faithfull. But this was way back in 1985.
    We hitched around almost the entire loop at Yellowstone and we're adopted by a tourist couple. Ended up being a great afternoon and evening.
    enemy of unnecessary but innovative trail invention gadgetry

  8. #28
    GSMNP 900 Miler HooKooDooKu's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-25-2007
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Age
    50
    Posts
    3,354
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coffee View Post
    It is at least frowned upon in most national parks as well.
    The Code of Federal Regulations for National Parks (Title 36 section 4.31) states
    Hitchhiking or soliciting transportation is prohibited except in designated areas and under conditions established by the superintendent.
    I know the Compendium or Rules and Regulations for GSMNP has carved out an exception to this law "for the purpose of hiking a park trail".
    Off hand, I don't know what other national parks have also carved out exceptions.

  9. #29
    Clueless Weekender Another Kevin's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-10-2011
    Location
    Niskayuna, New York
    Age
    61
    Posts
    3,683
    Journal Entries
    10

    Default

    NY has no state law against hitchhiking, but all five counties that the AT goes through have local ordinances mostly forbidding it.

    The last time I hitched in NY, it was way up in the Adirondacks (only a couple of miles to town, and I'd already started hiking them, but thought I'd put out my thumb perfunctorily). First driver returned my thumb with his finger. Second driver gave me a lift straight to a motel

    It doesn't count as hitchhiking, exactly, quite, but once I managed to yogi a ride from John Burroughs's great-granddaughter.

    In busier areas, it's often pretty easy to get a lift from day-trippers at the same trailhead. They're often going right by the town you're going to, anyway. (Of course, I try to pay that one forward - I do enough day and weekend trips myself, when I'm happy to give a lift to as many hikers as will fit.)
    I always know where I am. I'm right here.

  10. #30
    Occasionally lucid
    Join Date
    01-07-2010
    Location
    Virginia
    Age
    57
    Posts
    99

    Default

    I also recommend a sign.

    It seems that tradespeople or fellow outdoors enthusiasts are most likely to stop. However, hitched a ride with a guy whose Subaru was, like, two weeks old. I think he picked me up just to show off the car! You never know.
    GA -> ME
    '86 -> '89

  11. #31
    83.9% complete Berserker's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-09-2008
    Location
    Lynchburg, VA
    Age
    44
    Posts
    843
    Images
    1

    Default

    In my somewhat limited experience (being a section hiker I don't go into town too often) every time I've started to walk down a road I've been offered a ride. For disclosure I'm a 6'-5", 195 lb, bald male...not a pretty young lady. So I'd agree with everyone else in that it seems to be fairly easy to get a ride most of the time.

    Oh yeah, and I'm one of those guys that gives hikers rides if they happen to be in the parking lot when I'm either parking my car to start or getting to the lot at the end of a hike. Maybe I've been getting some good karma from the "pay it forward" method
    JMT - 2013

  12. #32

    Default

    On the AT I've only rarely had to stick out my thumb...more often than not someone offered me a ride before I got around to it. When you get to a road, take off your pack (but leave it visible) and take a few minutes to go over your trail guide/data book/trail journal, etc, etc. Have a snack, drink some water. If you are milling around at a trail head you will be offered a ride most of the time. Lots of locals know you are a hiker and not a vagrant and give hikers rides all the time. This is not the same as thumbing your way across the country and people that live near the trail know that.

  13. #33
    Registered User ScottTrip's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-30-2013
    Location
    Louisville, Kentucky
    Age
    60
    Posts
    66

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fiddlehead View Post
    Do they arrest you?
    Or just tell you to stop.
    I thought Wyoming was the only state that outlawed it.
    Go figure.
    3 hiking states banning it.
    What's next?
    I had only one policeman say anything (In NY I believe) he said just be careful with traffic. Not me, but a fellow hiker said that a local policeman gave him a ride into town. I really don't think they will give you much trouble.... Like I said before, they know you are hiking the AT and need to get to town.

  14. #34

    Default

    On my NOBO I didn't have to hitch until Great Barrington,Mass. And I think I ended up with a total of 6 hitches counting leaving Baxter. So pending mileage and how much you want to go in town you really don't have to hitch much. Most of the time I was lucky got to a road to see someone dropping off hikers, ran over there to see if they could take me back in to town.
    Lot of older guys would hold out a $5 bill, said it worked well and most of the time people wouldn't take the $


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    GAME '16 4/18/16-8/12/16
    Trailjournal: http://www.trailjournals.com/jjdontplay
    Blog (Post Trail Gear Reviews): https://keeppushingon.wordpress.com/

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •