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  1. #1
    Registered User Redbird2's Avatar
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    Default Allergic to some dogs

    I own a short haired dog (Doberman) but am allergic to some big furry dogs. If I'm already set up in a shelter, is it considered completely rude if I don't want your dog sleeping in the shelter with me? Obviously if they are there first they would have first rights. Are dogs so common that I should just forget about sleeping in shelters?

  2. #2
    Registered User Redbird2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redbird2 View Post
    I own a short haired dog (Doberman)
    I will NOT be bringing my dog with me.

  3. #3

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    Talk to your doctor. I doubt a three sided shelter will accumulate enough dog hair to bother you. They do accumulate a lot other foul stuff on the floor, such as mouse droppings that become powdered. Some shelters are swept, some aren't.

    I only slept in shelters when required to, but I visited the picnic tables in front of them for lunch quite often. Other than the Smokies, it's easy enough to avoid shelters.

  4. #4

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    To my way of thinking, if a person had special needs, better to bring a tent than play shelter police.

  5. #5

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    Dogs should not be allowed in shelters period. However, finding someone with a dog in the shelter is the least of your worries in getting shelter space. Especially if your planning a thru hike during prime time. You'll end up in your tent most, if not all the time for the first 500 miles or so.

    Many thru hikers with dogs generally go home at the Smokies, so you don't see too many past there. But there are still the weekender's and section hikers and those people are usually the ones who cause problems.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  6. #6

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    Last night there was a dog sleeping in the same spot you plan on sleeping on tonight. Seriously, you are the one with the problem, why do you expect everyone else to bend and make special accommodations for you? The common sense thing to do if you are allergic to dogs is to just not go where there are dogs. Plan on sleeping in your tent. Honestly, this whole dog thing boggles my mind...people say dogs shouldn't be allowed in shelters but we allow humans in there, which are far more disgusting than most animals I've seen.

  7. #7
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    Default

    I would suggest politely explaining that you are allergic to the dog and see how the owner reacts. Then go from there. Myself personally if I hiked with a dog (i dont) i would move on or tent if i even used a shelter.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by gracebowen View Post
    I would suggest politely explaining that you are allergic to the dog and see how the owner reacts. Then go from there. Myself personally if I hiked with a dog (i dont) i would move on or tent if i even used a shelter.
    And, if I had allergies, I would just plan on sleeping away from others whenever there was a chance of a problem and not dump my allergy issues on others. . . That being said, if I were all settled in a shelter and someone came in later with their dog and wanted it to be able to sleep next to me, I would probably say something and be pretty persistent that, in this case, first come, first serve means there dog needs to sleep well away from me or even outside the shelter if needed.

    And, when I hike with my dog, I assume she will not ever be welcome at shelters unless we are specifically invited, maybe after asking if people are okay with her in close proximity. ;-)
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  9. #9
    Registered User Redbird2's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the valuable info. People obviously have strong feelings both ways. With a little planning it doesn't sound like this would be much of an issue. As much as anything I was curious about how common it is for hikers to bring their dogs into the shelter.

  10. #10

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    Dogs should not be sleeping in shelters unless there is lots of available space. It's common trail etiquette.

  11. #11
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    spell dog backwards. that's how owners think of their dogs.

  12. #12
    Hiker bigcranky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redbird2 View Post
    As much as anything I was curious about how common it is for hikers to bring their dogs into the shelter.
    All. The. Time.

    In my experience, anyway.
    Ken B
    'Big Cranky'
    Our Long Trail journal

  13. #13
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    You can always just change your plans and hike the PCT instead. Then there won't be any shelters to worry about. ;-)
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  14. #14
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    I would never be in a shelter with my dog unless itís a food break and no one is around or if there was a serious issue like if he was hurt or Iím about to die because conditions are horrible. From what Iíve run into with 95% of dog owners in my area I meet on the trail is that they are very ignorant and probably shouldnít own a dog. They have no grasp on others space, and no control of their dogs, which is why people get so frustrated. But that is a rant of another topic.

    Iíd say bring a couple of those Claritin that dissolve on or under your tongue. Then if someone doesnít care about your situation or say something else in the shelter is bothering you thatís something good to take any time of day. Wonít keep you up, wonít make you drowsy. Sure there are other things that may be more affective but thatís what Iíd do.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  15. #15

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    I don't think it's a matter of who was there first. It a matter of respect for people's individual dignity and autonomy. You are infringing on someone else's rights to be free of you, your dog, and (as in the case of the single picnic table hogged by the first section hiker to arrive on scene), all your crap. You shouldn't be made sick and you shouldn't make other people sick. So it's puzzling to me that someone with allergies to some dogs themselves thinks it's okay to foist their own dog on people just because they got there first. Not trying to be rude, just pointing out the flaw in your logic?
    A Human Being.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bronk View Post
    Last night there was a dog sleeping in the same spot you plan on sleeping on tonight. Seriously, you are the one with the problem, why do you expect everyone else to bend and make special accommodations for you? The common sense thing to do if you are allergic to dogs is to just not go where there are dogs. Plan on sleeping in your tent. Honestly, this whole dog thing boggles my mind...people say dogs shouldn't be allowed in shelters but we allow humans in there, which are far more disgusting than most animals I've seen.
    Dogs are not supposed to be in the shelters
    https://tinyurl.com/MyFDresults

    A vigorous five-mile walk will do more good for an unhappy but otherwise healthy adult than all the medicine and psychology in the world. ~Paul Dudley White

  17. #17
    A proper quick, brave, steady, ready gentleman! ocourse's Avatar
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    I say it boils down to "hike your own hike". Don't like dogs, the wind, the other hikers, the noise, the temperature, the mosquitoes,? - just move on.
    I've learned....
    That a smile is an inexpensive way to improve your looks.

  18. #18

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    Dog story that makes me anti-dog in shelters. I got to the Windsor Furnace shelter in PA after a 20 mile day. Upon arriving with another hiker in his 60's we were met by a huge Irish Wolfhound that jumped up on us and left deep scratches in the other hiker's arms. The owner was a guy from WV that was just starting his flip flop hike, he came over and told us the dog would be fine and was just excited. He tied the dog up near the front of the shelter where it did the same to every other hiker that came up to the shelter. The shelter was pretty full with about 8 of us that night. About 10 o'clock another hiker came walking toward the shelter and the dog started barking loudly. Needless to say we had all been asleep. The owner ran out to quiet the dog and quickly told the hiker there was no room in the shelter. We did not find out about this until the next morning, but it was untrue, would could have squeezed one more in.

    The dog kept barking even after the hiker turned around and walked away in the dark, so the owner brought the dog into the shelter between him and the shelter wall. This dog was easily 100 lbs and it's head came up to my chest. About midnight the dog starts barking and jumps up and starts walking around on top of those of us in our bags in that end of the shelter. Stepping not only the hikers and bags, but more concerning, our air mattresses. I'm usually very non-confrontational, but I was done. I told the guy, he needed to fix to the problem. He said he was trying, to which I replied, "Dude, I don't care about trying, take care of your dog". My hope was that he would move the dog back outside. He quieted the dog and I was very glad to get back to sleep and head out about 6:30 the next morning. I knew with him being fresh on the trail, I would not have to deal with him, or his dog again.

    I also experienced some very responsible dog owners and well behaved dogs at several shelters and campsites. Over time, I always gave them compliments and told them I appreciated good dogs and great owners. I know it is hard work for the owners and dogs to do it the right way.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by PennyPincher View Post
    Dogs are not supposed to be in the shelters
    says who? there are no rules against having a dog in a shelter

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emerson Bigills View Post
    Dog story that makes me anti-dog in shelters. I got to the Windsor Furnace shelter in PA after a 20 mile day. Upon arriving with another hiker in his 60's we were met by a huge Irish Wolfhound that jumped up on us and left deep scratches in the other hiker's arms. The owner was a guy from WV that was just starting his flip flop hike, he came over and told us the dog would be fine and was just excited. He tied the dog up near the front of the shelter where it did the same to every other hiker that came up to the shelter. The shelter was pretty full with about 8 of us that night. About 10 o'clock another hiker came walking toward the shelter and the dog started barking loudly. Needless to say we had all been asleep. The owner ran out to quiet the dog and quickly told the hiker there was no room in the shelter. We did not find out about this until the next morning, but it was untrue, would could have squeezed one more in.

    The dog kept barking even after the hiker turned around and walked away in the dark, so the owner brought the dog into the shelter between him and the shelter wall. This dog was easily 100 lbs and it's head came up to my chest. About midnight the dog starts barking and jumps up and starts walking around on top of those of us in our bags in that end of the shelter. Stepping not only the hikers and bags, but more concerning, our air mattresses. I'm usually very non-confrontational, but I was done. I told the guy, he needed to fix to the problem. He said he was trying, to which I replied, "Dude, I don't care about trying, take care of your dog". My hope was that he would move the dog back outside. He quieted the dog and I was very glad to get back to sleep and head out about 6:30 the next morning. I knew with him being fresh on the trail, I would not have to deal with him, or his dog again.

    I also experienced some very responsible dog owners and well behaved dogs at several shelters and campsites. Over time, I always gave them compliments and told them I appreciated good dogs and great owners. I know it is hard work for the owners and dogs to do it the right way.
    ugh...people and their dogs. don't get me wrong. i love dogs. as long as they're disciplined and trained and obey what is a hopefully considerate owner. but it's just so rarely the case. and all the owners do is make lame excuses. and there's no excuse for your pooch ruining my night...or eating my pb&j...or nuzzling its nostril in my 'nads.

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