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  1. #21
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-17-2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Age
    62
    Posts
    4,889

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    Sorry I can't help. I couldn't get my adult children out of the house and be independent fast enough. They somehow seemed offended that I didn't want to take care of them any more.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    05-05-2011
    Location
    state of confusion
    Posts
    9,869
    Journal Entries
    1

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    If your family respects you and your judgement, they will be on board.
    If not..well at least you know that.

  3. #23
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-04-2016
    Location
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Posts
    116

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ash44 View Post
    I was just looking for suggestions on easing their worries because I love and respect them. They are still a big part of my life and I want them to be able to share in my excitement and know that I will be safe.
    Your parents' concerns are either due to lack of knowledge on their part (i.e. they've never camped or hiked, and are worried about bears or kidnappers), or they are specific to your abilities. We don't have enough information to address the latter, so I am writing this assuming your parents are not experienced backpackers, but that you do have backpacking experience.

    Getting your parents talking with experienced hikers and backpackers could help, so ask them to join you and go somewhere you'll encounter them.

    Since you live in Dalton, why not make a day trip to Springer Mountain with your parents? The 0.9 mile walk from the FS42 parking lot to the summit and shelter is not difficult. They can see the wide, easy to follow trail, navigation signs at junctions, and the distinct lack of bears and kidnappers, for themselves. On a nice weekend you'll see lots of other hikers who could relay their positive experiences camping, and that they've never been attacked by a bear or a kidnapper. Take your pack, set up your tent (including mattress and bag), make lunch for them at the shelter or campsite. They'll see that you enjoy being out there, as well.

    Blood Mountain is also a possibility. There are always people on the summit, but it's a much tougher climb than Springer. Any trailhead along US441 in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park will have hikers to talk to.

    On the other hand, if you have no experience camping, don't be the person whose first night camping is the start of a thru-hike attempt. You live close to many great trails - get a few nights under your belt, figure out what works for you in terms of gear and skills. Then take your parents on that day trip.

    Best case scenario, your parents pick up a new hobby and join you on hikes in the future.

  4. #24
    Registered User El JP's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-03-2017
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    128

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    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    If your family respects you and your judgement, they will be on board.
    If not..well at least you know that.
    This is pretty much it.

    Knowing how people are in general. more or less, i've found it's easier if you tell maybe one person. You can also just keep it secret and don't communicate with anyone until you are actually on the trail.

  5. #25

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    There are plenty of trail journals of folks your age that have had a successful thru hike. Look them up and supply links to your parents.

  6. #26
    Registered User Biscuit in GA's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-04-2017
    Location
    Ringgold, GA
    Age
    35
    Posts
    28

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    Odyssa thru-hiked the AT straight out of college - my dad and I loved her book about heading out there as a solo female hiker and the relationships she built along the way. She also goes into mistakes she made - so you don't - and learned from and talks about being safe on the trail. It's an easy fast read that should take you no time to go through together. You can check it out here: https://www.amazon.com/Becoming-Odys.../dp/0825305683 . I also love following Dixie, who also thru hiked solo. She's got great guides on YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQh...4VFcw/featured

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