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  1. #1
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    Default Looking for comments for Snugpak Jungle bag

    Being a fair/warm weather camper to this point (and the owner of some low end fall/winter bags) I opted for a couple Snugpaks for summer camping a couple years ago. Haven't used them in 2 years now but remember being surprised how August Shenandoah NP nights were almost too much for it and IRC, a time or two we broke out the winter bag as a blanket.

    So looking for others experience as I'm hoping to use it on the AT in the next week or two and am trying to decide whether to bring two, just in case-getting old now so it takes more to keep warm. Last weekend in the same area I'm likely to hike it got into the upper 40s a couple nights(thankfully was in a heated RV) which is right at the rated comfort limit for the bag, so I guess any comments on use in the 40-50 deg range would be most helpful.

    I know I can just wear clothes to make up the difference but after seeing a lot of comments here on NOT sleeping in one's hiking clothes I'm wanting to heed that and also not be saddled with using a more HD bag as even two Jungle bags are still a pretty small and light package and surely more versatile

  2. #2
    Registered User egilbe's Avatar
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    If its not keeping you warm at night, its useless weight. Light weight, cheap, warm. Pick any two.

  3. #3
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    With 100+ views and no real comments I'll try to clarify: hoping for comments like "I'm a cold sleeper so I added a XYZ liner and use a thermal pad which keeps me comfy to -75 deg"

    I find that even though the area I'm likely to be in is at very modest altitudes local forecasts seem to be nearly worthless at predicting trail temp(based on 2 trips in the last 30 days) so its difficult to know if I'll be camping at 45 or 60 deg. Because its much warmer where I live I can't even test at home to figure this out on my own

    Looking for real world experience because at 27oz for the Jungle bag, most fleece liners etc weigh nearly as much as just using my 2nd bag as a liner. Because I'm at my limit for both weight and volume with one Jungle bag, I'm looking for options.

  4. #4

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    IMO, the option is to abandon the heavy Jungle bag and go to a down or synthetic quilt. My 40* EE Enigma synthetic weighs 15.8 oz for example. You could go to a 20* or a 30* and be way under your current weight as well.
    AT Miles: 182.8 NOBO 13.9 SOBO :-)
    Pinhoti Miles: 5

  5. #5
    Registered User linus72's Avatar
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    i have a jungle bag but only use it in summer when eve temps are 60 or above. otherwise i find it too cold. and im a warm sleeper. better to be too warm than too cold. ive used long johns and a beanie to get away with it slightly more in shoulder season but found it just makes more sense to bring my down bag unless its quite warm at night. the ground is always colder, and its always colder in the mountains.
    Doin' the trail one section at a time
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  6. #6
    illabelle's Avatar
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    I'm not familiar with the Snugpaks, so can't comment on their suitability.

    I carry a 15 Big Agnes down bag pretty much every time we backpack. I carry long johns and a long-sleeved shirt that I sleep in (don't like the clammy/sticky feel of skin-to-skin or skin-to-nylon). I regulate temperature by unzipping the bag. I avoid backpacking in warm weather.

    Typically I'm a cold sleeper. Even in moderate temperatures I'll lay there kinda shivery until I get fully warmed up. If I'm too cool, I'll often bring my fleece and/or down jacket in the bag with me as an extra layer. I don't wear the jacket, just use it like a small blanket. My point is that clothing (not the wet stuff you hiked in) can still be used to help you stay warm.

    You mentioned a liner. I used one a time or two, found it to be of little thermal value and quite a nuisance with it getting twisted up around me.

  7. #7
    GSMNP 900 Miler HooKooDooKu's Avatar
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    A recent camping trip to GSMNP had me camping near Gregory Bald at an elevation of about 4,600' Had my thermometer with me and can confirm the morning temperature was right at 50-51
    I carried my Mountain Hardware UltraLamina 32 bag. Sleeping in shorts, short sleeve shirt and wool hat inside a tent, I was on the border of feeling a little to cold (slightly uncomfortable, but not uncomfortable enough I wanted to unzip from the sleeping bag to get some more cloths on).

    Snugpak's website claims a temperature rating of 7C (45F). So based on my experience, you'll need something extra (blanket, long sleeve shirt, etc) any time temperatures fall below 65.

  8. #8
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    WOW, this is what I suspected but really wanted to see someone else reach the same conclusion. Since I cant easily test low temps, today I gave it the opposite test- 70* living room floor. My conclusion confirms your supposition- its not going to get me any where near 40 something.
    This is very bad as my camping expenditures this year exceed $40K(travel trailer and van to tow it) and as a fixed income retiree I have to draw lines on spending.
    OK....where can I get a $250 bag for $25? LOL

    Quote Originally Posted by HooKooDooKu View Post
    A recent camping trip to GSMNP had me camping near Gregory Bald at an elevation of about 4,600' Had my thermometer with me and can confirm the morning temperature was right at 50-51
    I carried my Mountain Hardware UltraLamina 32 bag. Sleeping in shorts, short sleeve shirt and wool hat inside a tent, I was on the border of feeling a little to cold (slightly uncomfortable, but not uncomfortable enough I wanted to unzip from the sleeping bag to get some more cloths on).

    Snugpak's website claims a temperature rating of 7C (45F). So based on my experience, you'll need something extra (blanket, long sleeve shirt, etc) any time temperatures fall below 65.

  9. #9
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    Thank you so much for the input, my earlier experience with the bag was with no access to a thermometer and hampered by a wife who sweats when I freeze.
    I was not feeling confident my recollection and impressions were valid, but now I'm not even slightly tempted to try it- I hate waking up cold.

    Quote Originally Posted by linus72 View Post
    i have a jungle bag but only use it in summer when eve temps are 60 or above. otherwise i find it too cold. and im a warm sleeper. better to be too warm than too cold. ive used long johns and a beanie to get away with it slightly more in shoulder season but found it just makes more sense to bring my down bag unless its quite warm at night. the ground is always colder, and its always colder in the mountains.

  10. #10
    GSMNP 900 Miler HooKooDooKu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crossup View Post
    access to a thermometer
    For those that would like a light weight, relatively easy to read thermometer, I would suggest this or anything similar you can find at the local pet store (reptilian section). This particular one is easy to calibrate with a pair of needle nose pliers should it be a few degrees off (something you can't do with this hard to read thermometer).

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