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  1. #1

    Default Army Issue Self Inflating Sleeping Pad

    I'm hoping that I can get away with not buying a sleeping pad and using the one I was issued when I was in the Army. It's not the cheap, thin foam pad they used to give you. It's self-inflating, but I usually finish inflating it myself. It's made by Therma-Rest, which is a little reassuring.

    Here's a link to a page on Amazon... https://www.amazon.com/Military-Issu.../dp/B01LORTZVM

    Can't seem to find any information online about the R-Value or anyone's experience with this pad. Does anyone happen to know the R-Value or have a positive/negative experiences they can share?

  2. #2

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    Looks like and earlier version of the thermarest. I expect it has the same pluses and minuses as a standard thermarest. The R value is not great in cold weather. I usually use a thin foam pad underneath in cold weather.

  3. #3
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    agreed it looks a lot like my oldest thermarest pad. Still a very good pad.

    I's suggest you call Cascade Designs and ask them. Bet they's tell you exactly what it is....especially if your serial number is still legible

  4. #4

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    A new sleeping pad will cost you money and probably save you a little weight and space. $100 to $150 gets you a pad that is about 1/2 the size and weight, maybe 1/3. The new pads may or may not be more comfortable, depending on your sleeping style and your padding needs and wishes.

    I backpacked and climbed for years (actually about 20 years) with my old original thermarest pads that I bought in the late 70's. Your pad looks pretty similar to those. I found them quite adequate for both summer and winter activities. If the military issue one is a bit thinner than the originals that were about 1 1/4 inches thick, it might be a bit cool for deep winter.

    I say use it if your budget needs some help and exploit the new technology if the pound of weight and a little extra space is worth the money to you.

    If you use the pad you have, it can, of course, leave more money to invest in better gear elsewhere in your kit where it may give you more improvement per dollar in your overall experience than a pad upgrade. But then, for some people the perfect sleeping pad is their most important piece of gear.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  5. #5
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    One of those is advertised as 1.5" thick, 1 lbs 14 oz , R 4.8.
    If yours has the same height and similar weight, that R rating sounds about right given that the somewhat similar but 1" high Trail Scout is rated at r3.4
    All of those "self inflating" need to be topped up and the given R value is for an almost fully inflated mat.

  6. #6
    Registered User swjohnsey's Avatar
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    It'll work. R value is not a big factor on the trail it might be a factor if you plan on winter camping. You can save about a pound by spending a hundred bucks (a little more now) and getting one of the Thermarest Neolite inflatables

  7. #7
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    Yes, it will "work." I've used one myself for a stretch of trail. But you'll find the drawbacks will probably outweigh the singular benefit of being fo freeeee. It's heavy, its bulky, and it doesn't provide a heck of a lot more than a barrier. The bulk alone has prevented me from using it even one time during 10 plus years of service. If cost is your only concern, I would recommend something like the thermarest z-lite sol, very cost effective. However, you cannot beat the comfort and R-value of a bed of air. I bought a new NeoAir Xlite on eBay for almost $100 below retail. Research, try them out. Most outdoor retailers have a stand of all their air pads so you can (rei definitely does). Sleep and nutrition are arguably two of the most important things to consider for long distance hiking because they are so important to the recovery cycle.

    I also found that my issue sleep mat caught on tree limbs and kept my pack cover from adequately covering the pack from rain. Just things to consider.

    Happy Trails!


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  8. #8
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    The Thermarest I'm using (ProLite plus) is not far from the one you are asking about.
    Use it on all my hikes, love it, love the extra cushioning the extra thickness is providing.
    When packing the pad I fold it into half, length-wise, before rolling it up.
    When its really cold I add a CCF pad.
    My wife has a newer Prolite (without "plus"), and this would be a little too thin for my old bones.

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