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  1. #1
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    Default New Anker 10.000mAh - how to charge it?

    Now I've got my new Anker 10.000mAh powerpack (gave my good old Varta 6.000 as a godbye gift to our Bedouin guide this spring).
    The Anker is surprisingly small but heavy, and so far I love it. Works as expected.

    Also purchased an Anker dual charger, 24W, 2x 2.4A.
    Surprisingly big in size (charger plus some cables pack at a similar size than the powerpack itself), but reasonable weight.

    Now I'm surprised at the time it takes to do a full charge of the powerpack.
    Simple mathematics would suggest it should take some 4-5hrs for a full charge, but it took more than 6hrs to go from around 20% to full.

    No problem when spending a night in a hotel, but during a rest stop at a restaurant which might extend to 2hrs max there will not much % charge to be gained.
    (Sure I can charge the phone simultaneously).

    Is this a problem any of you has solved?
    Or is it a simple fact that can't be improved?

  2. #2
    Registered User DownEaster's Avatar
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    Unless you're willing to swap all your gear for Qualcomm 3.0 fast charging, there isn't a solution. Charge your phone and your power bank for as much time as you have access to a wall socket. I figure I'll get most of my charging done while in a laundromat waiting for all my clothing to get clean. (Hope they have WiFi so I can also upload pictures while sitting around in my rain suit!)

  3. #3
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    The Anker charger and the powerpack both state to support Qualcomm Quickcharge 2.0, that was as much as I could get. I was not aware that there was any newer, more powrful, standard.

    The phone charges in about 1.5-2hrs, using this new Anker charger, so the phone isn't a problem (given that I can keep the hands off the phone during charging, what isn't too easy, I'll admit).
    Its the powerpack that takes its time to charge.

    In my typical hiking routine, I will never go to a laundry (we don't have them in smaller towns anyway), but will pass by inns, restaurants and Alpine huts every now and then, and might drop in one of them to order a fresh salad and take a beer or two (the only things I can't carry myself).

    How would a Qualcomm 3.0 gear improve things?

  4. #4

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    10000 mah is quite a lot
    Mine takes about 8 hrs

  5. #5
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    I'm with Muddy. I usually charge overnight.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #6
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    Theoretically, with a 2A input, your Anker should charge as follows:

    10000maH/2000ma=5 Hours

    In reality, it takes 6-7 hours to achieve full charge on a 10000maH battery with a 2A input.

    It sounds like either your wall unit is a 1A output or your battery will not accept a 2A input. IIRC, all Anker's have 2A inputs. I'd get a wall unit like a Samsung that has a smart 2A output...

  7. #7
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    If your wall charger is a 2.4A output, it probably is a smart charger and should send a 2A output to your battery, which is all it will take on input. However, if it is a smart charger, check the size/condition of your USB cable. It may be sensing some resistance issue and is adjusting it's output accordingly....

  8. #8

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    Does anyone have experience with small portable solar panels for this purpose?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by gpburdelljr View Post
    Does anyone have experience with small portable solar panels for this purpose?
    If it's for the AT which is sometimes referred to as the Green tunnel . Solar panels work best in full sunlight with no shadow . 10000ma is a lot of battery for my use. When it's dead I'm ready for a shower and some town food, resuply.

  10. #10

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    Solar chargers are great if you have one which can deliver 2 amps and you can sit in the noon time sun for 8 hours.

    There are a bunch of factors which determine how long it will take to charge a battery. One factor is the size of the cells used to make up the battery pack and how much current they can take without undo heating. This is all controlled internally to the battery pack. Just because you have a 2.4A charger does not mean the battery pack will use it all. A 10K battery pack has a high power density, so they have to be real careful with the charging rate.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  11. #11

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    Solar is heavy.

    I charge my Anker 10050 (the one that knows quick charge) off the wall brick for my Android phone - the wall brick supports quick charge too.

  12. #12
    GSMNP 900 Miler
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    Quote Originally Posted by gpburdelljr View Post
    Does anyone have experience with small portable solar panels for this purpose?
    An Anker solar panel and the smallest Anker battery worked great for me on the JMT. But out in the Sierra mountains, I often had full sun above tree line, or a thin tree cover compared to the 'Green tunnel' of the AT.

    But based on some testing I did on my trip, I would think that it would be possible to use a solar panel, even in the 'Green Tunnel'. But you would have to use one of the bigger panels capable of putting out over 10 Watts. In that size category, the best panel I can think of from a combination of cost, durability/quality, and weight will be the Anker Solar Lite. The combination of this panel and an Anker 'lipstick' battery will weigh about 1 pound.

    Depending upon the density of the trees, a solar panel of this size will, over time, manage to get some charge to the battery. You would just need to augment having the panel on the back of your pack with taking any opportunity you stop for a rest to put the unit in full sun. Don't expect to be able to use your phone full-time (such as a GPS unit) with this sort of setup. But compared to relying only on a spare battery, with a larger solar panel, you would at least be able to use something like your phone at least when ever you have a clear view of the sky.

  13. #13
    Hiker bigcranky's Avatar
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    The charger that came with my Anker battery has two USB outlets, allegedly 2 amps each, so I can charge both the phone and the battery from one outlet. I don't generally carry the battery when hiking, but this has still come in handy several times.

    Also, even if you have only a couple of hours to charge, that's still more juice than you had before, right?
    Ken B
    'Big Cranky'
    Our Long Trail journal

  14. #14
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    my experience with these multi-tap wall warts is that when using both simultaneously one port will slow to a lower current rate.

    You say both are 2 amp, so maybe you're good...but double check. Maybe either can be 2A...but not both at the same time.

    You might maybe be better off with two separate wall warts.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    Solar chargers are great if you have one which can deliver 2 amps and you can sit in the noon time sun for 8 hours.

    There are a bunch of factors which determine how long it will take to charge a battery. One factor is the size of the cells used to make up the battery pack and how much current they can take without undo heating. This is all controlled internally to the battery pack. Just because you have a 2.4A charger does not mean the battery pack will use it all. A 10K battery pack has a high power density, so they have to be real careful with the charging rate.
    The charger typically has a current rating.

    The battery, has circuitry that controls the charge rate.

    The batteries internal resistance, the charge cable resistance, the batteries charging circuitry, the chargers voltage output, the chargers current rating, all determine what the charge current will be and how long it takes.

    My heavy anker powercore cables, charge much higher rate than cheap cables, no comparison.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by HooKooDooKu View Post
    An Anker solar panel and the smallest Anker battery worked great for me on the JMT. But out in the Sierra mountains, I often had full sun above tree line, or a thin tree cover compared to the 'Green tunnel' of the AT.

    But based on some testing I did on my trip, I would think that it would be possible to use a solar panel, even in the 'Green Tunnel'. But you would have to use one of the bigger panels capable of putting out over 10 Watts. In that size category, the best panel I can think of from a combination of cost, durability/quality, and weight will be the Anker Solar Lite. The combination of this panel and an Anker 'lipstick' battery will weigh about 1 pound.

    Depending upon the density of the trees, a solar panel of this size will, over time, manage to get some charge to the battery. You would just need to augment having the panel on the back of your pack with taking any opportunity you stop for a rest to put the unit in full sun. Don't expect to be able to use your phone full-time (such as a GPS unit) with this sort of setup. But compared to relying only on a spare battery, with a larger solar panel, you would at least be able to use something like your phone at least when ever you have a clear view of the sky.
    What he said. Used one on the JMT with great results.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  17. #17
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    OK, as others have stated above, any juice I can get during a noon break with a wall outlet is better than nothing.

    The whole set I'm using (charger, cable and powerbank) is from Anker, according to Amazon the charger is recommended to fit to the powerbank and the cable came with the powerbank, Its a rather short and stiff/thick cable.
    To charge the phone I'm using a longer cable with a magnetic dock that fits to the waterproof Sony Z3 compact.

    The 10.000mAh should get me through 8-10 days of hiking (running the phone in GPS tracking mode during the day).
    GPS and map display is the main thing I'm using the phone for, with an occasional photo here and there, and getting online one or two times a day just to give a message to my family how I'm doing, when geography will allow reception.
    Only problem is, that sometimes I simply forget to put the phone back in airplane mode - and this will drain the battery pretty fast.

    Well, so far I love the Anker (exact naming: Anker Powercore+ 10.050mAh).

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