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  1. #1
    Registered User DownEaster's Avatar
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    Default Yukon Charlie's Trek Lite Series Trekking Pole

    I've used a walking stick occasionally in the past. Haven't used trekking poles, but figured my knees won't last forever so I just got my starter pair: Yukon Charlie's Trek Lite Series Trekking Poles, from Amazon. For some reason for a couple of days the red poles were half the price of the other colors, and I doubt that little bit of paint is going to make a difference in use.

    These have cork handles, which I like the feel of; from what I've read, they're good for both wet and dry conditions. The shafts are aluminum (at under $20 for the pair, I didn't expect anything else). Weight is 8.5 ounces per pole according to my kitchen scale. Length adjustment is an interesting mix of systems: twist lock for the lower section, and flick lock for the upper; you set the twist lock once and use the quicker flick lock as you change from uphill to downhill use. The flick locks have big knurled knobs, so if they need to be tightened no tools are necessary. Grips and straps appear to be identical on the two poles rather than left/right specific. There are two sets of screw-on baskets included: bigger baskets for snow, and smaller (sand? I dunno) baskets. There are also protective plastic boots to cover the carbide pole tips, which I can use getting started on the asphalt in my cul-de-sac.

    Yukon Charlie's is primarily a snowshoe manufacturer. I found one how-to video on their web site for the trekking poles, which showed how you added and removed the snow baskets.

    I'm a trekking pole newbie, so I can't comment knowledgeably about use. So far I've smacked the poles around on my floors and the length adjustments haven't budged. If anybody has something useful to add about these poles, please chime in.

  2. #2
    Registered User Maineiac64's Avatar
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    I don't know about your poles but It took me a while to discover on my Leki that you can adjust the strap length and that it works well to put your hand up through the loop. I was out hiking a steep rocky trail this weekend and I don't know how people go without them.

  3. #3
    Registered User DownEaster's Avatar
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    Yeah, I've already adjusted the straps so my hands come naturally onto the grips when I just let my wrists settle onto the strap loops. Here's a picture of my poles (first), and a different offering from YC (second) which shows the identical straps used.

    YukonCharlieTrekkingPoles.jpgPoles.jpg

  4. #4
    Registered User MtDoraDave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DownEaster View Post
    Yeah, I've already adjusted the straps so my hands come naturally onto the grips when I just let my wrists settle onto the strap loops. Here's a picture of my poles (first), and a different offering from YC (second) which shows the identical straps used.

    Some people insist there is a right way and a wrong way, and there may be... but in the end, do what feels best for you. It sounds like you are going into your straps from the top if they are resting on your wrists. Before you get too used to that, try this method also. This is what many people say is the "correct" way to use the straps.



    It is the way I ended up doing it, after doing it the other way for a while. I like this because when I need to put some weight on the poles, my weight is supported by the meaty part of my hand as opposed to my grip strength.

  5. #5

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    Its good to see that Yukon Charlie appears to have gone upmarket, for quite awhile their snowshoes and poles were blatant chinese made duplicates of similar brands.

    A FYI poles straps are controversial and I expect one of their supporters will be right along to protest For "urban walking" and well graded smooth trails like many sections of the AT are down south they are a potential performance booster. The big caveat is that in not so smooth rocky trail conditions like much of maine and the whites in NH and the infamous rocks of PA and NY, straps should not be used as in a tripping and falling situation their use can cause injuries. They are a two edged sword, the pole with strap may keep a hiker from falling which is good but if it doesn't the strap frequently keeps the hand attached to the pole and its highly likely that the pole will lean in a direction away from where the hiker is falling. This on occasion causes shoulder and wrist injuries as the arm is forcible yanked in the direction the pole wants to go. I see a lot of through hikers with poles in the whites and few if any still have the straps attached.

    I find that going down steep slopes that I palm the top of the poles for best effect and straps are useless.
    Last edited by peakbagger; 07-24-2017 at 09:33.

  6. #6
    Registered User DownEaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MtDoraDave View Post
    It sounds like you are going into your straps from the top if they are resting on your wrists.
    I guess I could have phrased that better. No, I'm going up from the bottom. The loops of straps are resting on the tops of my wrists when I let the weight of my hands drop.

  7. #7
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    A quick note for those reading this thread.

    In many conditions putting your hands through the straps is a bad idea for safety reasons.

    It is not uncommon when walking through areas of rocks where it is really easy to get a pole tip caught in between 2 rocks or in a crack. As your body moves past this point the pole does not come with you and with the strap around your wrist all of a sudden there is a strong pull back on your arm. Depending on where you are this can cause you to lose your balance trip and fall fairly easily when you have a pack on. And especially so when the rocks are wet. You can really get hurt this way.

    You need to be able to let go of the pole when necessary.

    Additionally if you have your hands through the straps you will break poles much more frequently by not being able to let go of them or toss them when you fall down (I know - that never happens to you).

    When crossing difficult streams poles are a huge plus but here there is a dilemma. If you go down and your hands are not through the straps and you let go of the poles they might be lost for good. If your hands are through the straps and you have to swim for it - that kind of sucks too.

  8. #8

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    As with many things, techniques are learned with poles to help mitigate both real and anecdotal dangers of use. Experience is usually the best teacher for this kind of thing. If the risk of use were high, few people would use them.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by DownEaster View Post
    I've used a walking stick occasionally in the past. Haven't used trekking poles, but figured my knees won't last forever so I just got my starter pair: Yukon Charlie's Trek Lite Series Trekking Poles, from Amazon. For some reason for a couple of days the red poles were half the price of the other colors, and I doubt that little bit of paint is going to make a difference in use.

    These have cork handles, which I like the feel of; from what I've read, they're good for both wet and dry conditions. The shafts are aluminum (at under $20 for the pair, I didn't expect anything else). Weight is 8.5 ounces per pole according to my kitchen scale. Length adjustment is an interesting mix of systems: twist lock for the lower section, and flick lock for the upper; you set the twist lock once and use the quicker flick lock as you change from uphill to downhill use. The flick locks have big knurled knobs, so if they need to be tightened no tools are necessary. Grips and straps appear to be identical on the two poles rather than left/right specific. There are two sets of screw-on baskets included: bigger baskets for snow, and smaller (sand? I dunno) baskets. There are also protective plastic boots to cover the carbide pole tips, which I can use getting started on the asphalt in my cul-de-sac.

    Yukon Charlie's is primarily a snowshoe manufacturer. I found one how-to video on their web site for the trekking poles, which showed how you added and removed the snow baskets.

    I'm a trekking pole newbie, so I can't comment knowledgeably about use. So far I've smacked the poles around on my floors and the length adjustments haven't budged. If anybody has something useful to add about these poles, please chime in.
    A couple years back I caught (wasn't looking for them) a pair of lightweight aluminum, rubber grip, flip lock poles on holiday sale for about $16 per pair shipped at Cheaper than Dirt. I prefer my carbon Cascade Mountain Tech poles but the aluminum poles are great back ups and a good practice/workout set up.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Singto View Post
    A couple years back I caught (wasn't looking for them) a pair of lightweight aluminum, rubber grip, flip lock poles on holiday sale for about $16 per pair shipped at Cheaper than Dirt. I prefer my carbon Cascade Mountain Tech poles but the aluminum poles are great back ups and a good practice/workout set up.

    Not a fan of cascade mountain tech poles. The carbide tips donít last long and the bottom section arnt very durable. Canít fit them in my pack for travel to long . Iím happy with BD Z poles aluminum . Ymmv

    thom

  11. #11
    MuddyWaters's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wyoming View Post
    A quick note for those reading this thread.

    In many conditions putting your hands through the straps is a bad idea for safety reasons.

    It is not uncommon when walking through areas of rocks where it is really easy to get a pole tip caught in between 2 rocks or in a crack. As your body moves past this point the pole does not come with you and with the strap around your wrist all of a sudden there is a strong pull back on your arm. Depending on where you are this can cause you to lose your balance trip and fall fairly easily when you have a pack on. And especially so when the rocks are wet. You can really get hurt this way.

    You need to be able to let go of the pole when necessary.

    Additionally if you have your hands through the straps you will break poles much more frequently by not being able to let go of them or toss them when you fall down (I know - that never happens to you).

    When crossing difficult streams poles are a huge plus but here there is a dilemma. If you go down and your hands are not through the straps and you let go of the poles they might be lost for good. If your hands are through the straps and you have to swim for it - that kind of sucks too.
    If your a klutz , dont use poles.
    Klutzes should just stay home to lessen chances of injury.
    In fact, thats a good idea for or everyone.
    Just stay home on sofa. Your safe there.
    "Inevitably, a long distance hiker must choose between travelling light, and not travelling at all." - Earl V. Shaffer

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