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  1. #21

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    ..........
    Last edited by Traffic Jam; 07-15-2017 at 14:19.

  2. #22
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    One of the problems with petroleum and mineral oils and petrolatum is it seals the skin ceasing any skin respiration where no moisture, air, or water can neither leave or enter the skin. The dermatologists, plastic surgeons, and a Hollywood make up artist I've asked tell me other mosturizers that aren't occlusive - totally sealing the skin ceasing respiration and nourish the skin without clogging up the pores so much might be a better approach for foot care such as shea butter, Vit E, coconut oil, coconut butter, jojoba, kukui nut butter, and olive oil may be better along with natural botanicals. Other more mainstream MD's and some having ties to the cosmetics industry tell me no problem petrolatum and mineral oil is safe citing FDA accounts.

    Either way I want my body including skin on feet to function as it naturally evolved respiring. For example, totally sealing skin applying cheap "filler" bi products such as petroleum jelly and mineral oil has a differnt consequence applied to macerated skin compared to very dry skin. This has consequences to feet so to say these products are totally "safe" as if there can't be any negative consequences is debatable other than for diabetics.

    I don't want my skin clogged up on a hike and that includes skin on feet. Now, if you're inclined for your own reasons to use petroleum bi products on feet maybe there should be intermittent periods where these products should be totally removed to allow for skin to breathe.

  3. #23
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Currently in rigorous testing. Far more ingredients than you might think possible, but didn't see any petroleum mentioned. Slick feel. Not greasy.
    https://www.traderjoes.com/fearless-flyer/article/2600

    Wayne


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  4. #24

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    This approach seems somewhat contradictory to what works for me. I try to minimize moisture and avoid softening my skin. Sounds like it works for multiple people so I am wondering if the covered skin becomes wet under the applied product? Maybe the reduction in friction reduces the possibility of a blister more than an increase in moisture might create?
    "Sleepy alligator in the noonday sun
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  5. #25
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    Thanks Wayne. Totally new to me. 2 oz tin for $4 too.

  6. #26
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    Gator you are exactly voicing my concern and question. Maybe considering we're talking about feet and applying products to cease having and addressing existing foot blisters in the context of possibly changing backpacking conditions feet can experience also plays into what is suitable compared to moisturizing skin elsewhere like on one's face?

  7. #27
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Thanks Wayne. Totally new to me. 2 oz tin for $4 too.
    Sounds like the price has doubled. I thought they were about $2.50 a couple years ago. I bought an extra tin as I was leaving Houston.
    If this stuff works I'll resupply the next time we're in Asheville.
    Cheers!
    Wayne


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  8. #28
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    Petroleum jelly has always been my go-to ointment for chafing, rashes where the sun doesn't shine, etc. Have not tried it on toes, but I like the idea.

  9. #29

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    Rubbing is friction, causes heat and blisters. Lots of different products to "glide" and reduce friction.
    The creams such as the Aquaphor and such, what I've read, is after wet days, massage some into the soles of the feet. Put on socks and go to sleep. It helps with the damage done by the feet being wet all the time.
    For a couple of bucks, get a weird haircut and waste your life away Bryan Adams....
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  10. #30
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    https://www.blisterprevention.com.au...ion-prevention

    Getting to the end check out the last two sub topics: What does the perfect maceration prevention strategy look like? and Conclusion. No perfect system product for all people all the time doing different things or, in shorter words, as Phillip Warner of SectionHiker was quoted saying "your decision needs to be based on the conditions you face" that I also like to use so often. He also mentions the use of waterproof Rocky Gore-Tex socks (which I didn't test, unfortunately).


    When you have it all figured let me know - I'll find you some venture capital and we'll go in 70 (me) - 30 partnership. We'll right a book, Get an infomercial. Distribute product lines, Get a bunch of referrals from ultra runners, hikers, and outdoor people.

  11. #31
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    And then...
    You can begin researching how to prevent and/or cure blisters under callouses.
    Wayne


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  12. #32

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    thanks for the link Dogwood. I'd half forgotten reading over that....
    For a couple of bucks, get a weird haircut and waste your life away Bryan Adams....
    Hammock hangs are where you go into the woods to meet men you've only known on the internet so you can sit around a campfire to swap sewing tips and recipes. - sargevining on HF

  13. #33

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    I got to Part 2 of DW's link. The author doesn't appear to understand waterproof materials and breathability. The author does not test the Gore Tex socks, where the fabric is specifically designed for breathability. I have a pair as well as Sealskinz (which are neoprene AFAIK). Gore Tex is designed to allow water vapor (perspiration) to pass out. The author does not appear to recognize that, although I don't know if neoprene is breathable. Both products macerate my feet. The Sealskinz though are baggy and bunch up vs my Gore Tex socks which are thinner and cut more tightly. The Gore Tex socks are pretty smooth though and don't create blister issues. I like to get out of them in camp to let my feet dry.
    I think my feet sweat a lot. I find that even with mesh trail runners, not waterproof, and a thin hiking sock, I still end up with sweaty socks and macerated feet. On a hot dry day, I will remove my trail runners and socks, turn the socks inside out, remove superfeet, and let socks, shoes, and feet dry in the sun during lunch and sometimes other breaks.
    Maybe petroleum jelly is working for unsweaty feet?
    "Sleepy alligator in the noonday sun
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  14. #34
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    Glide - yes it works - but the original invention was to speed up the healing process for cuts and burns, and it works
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Chesebrough
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    I (OP) will continue to use petroleum jelly because it has worked for me for a long time. The thread has brought out many available options though which may be useful for many forum members. Good discussion.

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    I've been using petroleum Jelly for years on feet and other chafing spots, it was a regular on my AT thru and the very dusty El Camino in Spain. Nothing negative that I have ever noticed and the positive effects are amazing.

    I usually carry a small tube of petroleum jelly for lips in my day bag as it is the same thing in a much smaller container.

    I've tried body glide but found it to be inferior.

    Also FWIW Petroleum Jelly is available in vending machines and hostels (called albergues there) all along El Camino French Way, so I'm not the only one using it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Starchild View Post
    ...Also FWIW Petroleum Jelly is available in vending machines and hostels (called albergues there) all along El Camino French Way, so I'm not the only one using it.
    Yes, but what are they lubricating??? ;-)

  18. #38
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    Don't know if this is helpful but, I use natural silk anklets, wool mid weight socks, no blisters. That said, I don't have super sweaty feet.

    My son followed moms advise and also had no issues, nor his friends who follow same protocol

    i think good good nutrition and hydration also play an important though undervalued role

    good hiking!

  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Odd Man Out View Post
    Yes, but what are they lubricating??? ;-)
    Those lubricants were also widely available but in different vending machines which also included viagra.

  20. #40

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    Gonna think I am either stupid or crazy, however I have duct taped my feet before. A strip of tape across each heel...

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