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  1. #1

    Default MSR Hubba Hubba (or another suggestion??)

    Hey all! I'm hunting for a new tent. My Lightheart Solo was great, but after over 2,500 miles and an Appalachian Trail thru-hike, it's seen its better days. [IMG]http://www.*************************/wcf/images/smilies/wink.png[/IMG]

    I'm looking for recommendations for a lightweight 2-person tent and hoping to pay less than $400. I've got my eye on the MSR Hubba Hubba:
    https://www.rei.com/product/863076/msr-hubba-hubba-nx-tent?cm_mmc=aff_AL-_-133155-_-160935-_-NA&avad=160935_fe7d2e11

    Anyone had any experience with it? Or other recommendations? I'll definitely use it on my JMT hike next year, so it needs to be able to withstand high elevation winds and weather. Thanks! ~Clarity

    www.AppalachianTrailClarity.com
    Great blog site for new and/or female hikers! www.appalachiantrailclarity.com

  2. #2
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    The Solong 6 is enough room for me, my kid and small dog...worth a look..


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    Disclaimer......Im just a weekend warrior but it has worked well on the JMT, collegiate loop, FHT and about 500 AT miles...should have added I'm about 5'11" 215, 10 yr old about 75lbs and 20lb jrt with packs inside.....great company.


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    I have used a Lightheart Solong 6 with my wife and it's fine. I'm 6" 3" and 250 lbs. We sleep head to toe. I've used an MSR Hubba2 as well it's a fine tent as well but heavier.
    Everything is in Walking Distance

  5. #5

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    I had the Nemo Dagger 2p. It's basically identical to the Hubba Hubba NX. I didn't like how that pole sticks out across the top to hold the fly over the vestibule. It's prone to heavy loading in side winds to the tent.

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    I found the HHNX to small for me and returned it almost immediately! I have and love a Zpacks Duplex...obviously it's expensive and if that's and issue, I can almost equally recommend the new BA Copper Spur UL2 HV. I have this tent as well for my sons and it is fantastic! Much more room that the HHNX.

  7. #7
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Memorial Day Weekend last year I was in a shop looking at tents. MSR vs. BA. I bought an MSR Hubba Hubba NX. I've used it in Colorado above 10,500'. I had some wind one night at 11,500'. No problem. A good tent. A lot to like in this tent.
    Wayne


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    I have the Hubba Hubba NX, although to be honest I have no packing experience with it. I bought it to replace my car-camping tent and to backpack the Colorado Trail with. I generally hammock but on the CT that might be a poor choice. That said, I like the room and it's pretty close in weight with my hammock system.

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    i have about 250 nights on a regular hubba hubba that i bought back in 2009......

    love it...

    its got a ton of room inside, especially for one person..........i can sit up in it and have plenty of headroom left over....

    never have gotten wet in it.............nice side entrances........

    i only use it now for car camping or canoe camping as i went with something lighter after hauling it for 6 years...

    its a touch on the heavy side, so i wanted to go a bit lighter (had a fly creek ul2 and now a rainbow).....

    the new ones (obviously) have cut the weight down..........

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by twistwrist View Post
    Hey all! I'm hunting for a new tent. My Lightheart Solo was great, but after over 2,500 miles and an Appalachian Trail thru-hike, it's seen its better days. [IMG]http://www.*************************/wcf/images/smilies/wink.png[/IMG]

    I'm looking for recommendations for a lightweight 2-person tent and hoping to pay less than $400. I've got my eye on the MSR Hubba Hubba:
    https://www.rei.com/product/863076/msr-hubba-hubba-nx-tent?cm_mmc=aff_AL-_-133155-_-160935-_-NA&avad=160935_fe7d2e11

    Anyone had any experience with it? Or other recommendations? I'll definitely use it on my JMT hike next year, so it needs to be able to withstand high elevation winds and weather. Thanks! ~Clarity

    www.AppalachianTrailClarity.com
    I have a Hubba Hubba that I use when my wife hikes with me. It is a very comfortable tent. We have survived a number of storms in it. Last year, we were in a storm in the Grand Canyon when the winds exceeded 50 mph. The tent held up nicely. We have also survived some heavy rains without getting wet. It would be a good choice.
    Shutterbug

  11. #11
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    I have a Hubba Hubba NX since spring last year.

    When with my wife, the space is a bit narrow, packs have to stay in the apsides where they barely are covered against rain. Every movement and action inside the tent has to be considered well.
    So for two persons it just works.
    For a single person its pure luxury, and I love it.
    Setup, teardown and packing is as great as it can be.
    Every single detail is well thought through and works as expected. I like the color of the outer tent, Stone-Grey, that does stealth it resembling a huge bolder from the distance, while it does look innocent, non-Military.
    While all materials seem to be a bit on the small, tiny and flimsy edge, all things work just great and I slowly gained trust that it will have a long life.
    I especially like the feature, that you can collect rain water by using the door-zipper cover as a gutter. Just place a cup beneath, and it will fill drop by drop.

    There are some shortcomings:
    - The outer tent is so short, it ends up maybe 20-30cm off the ground, thus exposing the lower rim of inner tent to cold and rain. There is condensation on this part of the inner, and you will eventually touch the inner with the sleeping bag - so the bag gets wet, inevitabely. Not nice to have a wet down bag from day one on.
    - The floor of the tent is not 100% waterproof. When you wake up in a poodle, your stuff that has touched the floor will most likely be a bit wet.
    - There are tiny leaks in the very edges of the inner tent, at the point where all seams meet to the tieout. In a really heavy downpour water seeps in at this point.
    - I'm not really convinced if the tent would withstand a storm. Never had one, so I can't tell from own experience.
    - The poles are a bit clumsy to pack, there are two ring-shaped connector pieces that do not fold down nicely. Not a big problem, but something you have to take care of a bit at every packup.
    - The inner and outer tent is coated with a fire-retardant (is this the right word?) - thats good for safety, but it gives the tent a strange smell. Best is, to air it out for as many days/weeks before your hike as possible.

    Sidenote:
    I made a groundcloth out of housewrap, with a strap on every corner, that allows to setup the tent in rain outside-first.

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    My wife and I had a 2013 MSR Hubba Hubba that was uber-liveable for the two of us, me 5-10″, she 5-9″. It’s 49″W x 84″L x 40″T. We both used 25″ wide Thermarests with it, though they inflate less wide than that. Perfect fit in the old Hubba Hubba. However, we wanted a lighter tent.
    So, the search began. I briefly considered the CSUL2 HV. My wife and her girlfriend use the older version of this tent, and it’s a bit tight volume wise. They don’t seem to mind, but my wife has commented how much better she likes the volume of the MSR. I also find the BA CS materials a bit light (those trade-offs again), and the guying slightly more extensive than the Hubba. Also, I have no confidence in the viability of the new vent. They were obviously trying to save weight by making it smaller, and more effective by putting it up higher, but I think they got carried away and made a major blunder. The way it's positioned will allow wind and rain in under certain conditions. I'd also add, if there is an uglier tent than the Copper Spur, I'm not sure what it may be. While aesthetics are subjective, there is a psychology of color. It’s not the exterior “look”, it’s the interior “feeling” that I’m referring to. Soft, subtle colors in the light gray/cream/off-white range create a restful interior environment, while still giving a bright feeling in overcast weather. Harsh, bright, primary and fully saturated colors don’t create the same feeling. If you’ve ever been tent-bound during a storm for more than a day you’ll appreciate the difference. Also, a lighter color interior reflects light back better than darker, saturated colors, giving a brighter interior at night w/ an interior light source. However, I think it’s fair to say, you get used to whatever you’re using… the differences are not as noticeable unless compared side by side. Thankfully, BA is now offering the CS line in a subtler olive color. However, the vent remains a deal-killer to me.


    I Initially ordered a NEMO Dagger 2P. I really like NEMO, and have a Hornet 1P for solo trips (fantastic tent!). The Dagger is quite long at 90″, and is nicely wide at 50″, and its vestibules are huge. It also has tremendous head room at 42″. However, I decided I didn’t need the volume and extra staking (weight) of the vestibules, which are also going to be a bit tough to close from inside the tent, they’re so large. All our backpacking is in grizzly country, so we always keep our packs away from the tent, hence no need for overly large vestibules. I also don’t like the door orientation, almost forcing the occupants to sleep head to toe. And, the Dagger is 2.5 ounces heavier than advertised. Still, a fine tent, but enough mitigations that I passed on it.


    Soooo, I returned the Dagger to REI and bought the MSR Hubba Hubba NX. It’s actually lighter than advertised by 1 ounce, which is refreshing. By ditching cords that will not be used for guying, the extra stakes for that guying, and swapping the MSR stuff sacks for two Tarp Tent stuff sacks (one for each my wife and I to split the tent), and a TT stake sack, I got the Hubba to 3lb’s 7.3 ounces. I added a Tyvek “Footprint”, and all-up weight is 3lbs 12.7 ounces. That’s 12.4 ounces less than the previous Gen Hubba Hubba, which is a nice weight savings.


    I have zero complaints about the Hubba Hubba NX. It’s well-thought-out. The new vestibule entry zips are so simple-smart, I wonder why no one thought of them before? Venting is unmatched by others in its class, and far better than the previous Gen. Materials are more robust than the BA tents (which obviously increases weight – I’m willing to accept that trade-off in a 2P tent). I also appreciate the thoughtful integration of solid fabric in the tent body, rather than all mesh. The color is a bit more putty-grey than what the advertising pics show, and overall the interior feeling is as good as any tent I’ve used. The basic Hubba design is pretty much the gold standard for a 2P, 3 Season tent. It’s remarkable how often it’s copied, from Big Agnes to Tarp Tent. It works.
    Obviously every tent is a compromise weighted one direction or another. The trick is deciding which features you “need” and which compromises you can live with. For my wife and I the Hubba hits the sweet spot.

  13. #13
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    The Hubba Hubba is a great tent. So is the BA Copper Spur UL2. I'd buy whichever was on sale.

  14. #14
    Registered User kestral's Avatar
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    I loved my hubba hubba. I had the green model (about 7 years old?) which I like much better than the current red. Never got wet, even with torrential downpours, lots of room, enough room in vestibule to squat and pee during a down pour, or cook (there are two vestibules). Set it up for a Florida hurricane in back yard just to see... was in corner by wood fence, staked out with rocks, it was dry inside! I was uber impressed and my son worried less about mom hiking

    i have since gifted this tent to my son and now use a rainbow due to weight and I usually hike alone or with dog so I don't need as much room.

    Solid well made tent that you won't regret, reasonable price point.

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    I retract my recommendation of the Copper Spur UL2. The 2017 "improvements" on the Copper Spur series are suspect.

  16. #16
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bansko View Post
    I retract my recommendation of the Copper Spur UL2. The 2017 "improvements" on the Copper Spur series are suspect.
    Thanks. The 2016 model was equally suspect in my opinion.
    Wayne


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