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  1. #1
    Registered User tawa's Avatar
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    Default Recommendations for Daypack

    In search of a small day pack for when I'm hiking 8-10 miles or when performing trail maintenance.
    Possible a small enough pack to place inside my large pack so when Im out away from base camp for a day before returning in the evening.
    What are you using that works for these kind of situations.
    Recommendations please.

  2. #2
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    I really like the REI Flash 18. It isn’t perfect, but it's darn close. Its light enough at about 12 ounces. It carries a light load fairly well, as long as you are mindful of how you pack it. I would estimate that it could probably carry close to 10 lbs comfortably. The only negative I can point out is the obvious lack of water bottle holders. In winter or essentially anytime it is under 70 or so degrees this is my go to bag for dayhiking. Anytime it is hot and humid I'll switch to my Osprey Daylite since it allows me to access my water easily and more frequently.

  3. #3

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    My day pack is a $10 no name pack I picked up at Target. I've never seen the need for anything snazzier.
    Life Member: ATC, ALDHA, Superior Hiking Trail Association

  4. #4
    Registered User sloger's Avatar
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    Wal-Mart $19.

  5. #5
    MuddyWaters's Avatar
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    Depends on what you intend to put in it, and how much it weighs

    I use a s2s ultrasil. 2.4 oz. Straps are thin fabric, Ok for 5-8 lbs

    https://www.amazon.com/Sea-Summit-Ul...a-sil+day+pack
    Last edited by MuddyWaters; 03-13-2017 at 20:02.
    "Inevitably, a long distance hiker must choose between travelling light, and not travelling at all." - Earl V. Shaffer

  6. #6
    North Georgia Wanderer soumodeler's Avatar
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    Pretty much anything will work.

    I picked up a REI Flash 18 on sale a few years ago for $20 and use it for most day hikes. Nice little pack.

  7. #7

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    I've migrated from the REI Flash 18 to the Flash 22 because the Flash 22 has the external water bottle pockets and because the top is just slightly larger in diameter so it can fit a 1 gal milk jug or a 6-pack into the 22 much easier than the 18. Both are simple, light, and carry well.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  8. #8
    Registered User -Rush-'s Avatar
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    This should take care of you.

    e2d24a1b2ffa4cf48d98d0aaeacbfbc9.jpg
    "Though I have lost the intimacy with the seasons since my hike, I retain the sense of perfect order, of graceful succession and surrender, and of the bold brilliance of fall leaves as they yield to death." - David Brill

  9. #9
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    Default

    If you're looking for something small enough to stash away in a larger pack until needed, check out Peregrine Equipment. I have the 2.3 oz. Ultralight Summit Day Pack and I love it. It's much tougher than you would expect, and quite versatile. I've also used it as an urban backpack that will fit in a pocket to be deployed when needed. Peregrine also makes a dry bag version of the Summit Pack that weighs 3.2 oz.

  10. #10
    Garlic
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    Default

    Find something inexpensive with no frame pad, no padding, cut off any belts or sternum straps, unnecessary lids, etc, get it down to a few ounces. I got a Mountainsmith pack as a freebie, volunteering on a trail crew, perfect for trail work. (Mountainsmith is a local sponsor.)
    "Throw a loaf of bread and a pound of tea in an old sack and jump over the back fence." John Muir on expedition planning

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by soumodeler View Post
    Pretty much anything will work.
    Yep. A kid's repurposed school bookpack can be a cheap and effective solution. Though there are lighter daypacks around, they're quite rugged so you don't need to worry about where you put them down. And IMO, for a dayhike, counting grams isn't really that critical. The ones I've used from my kids old LLB bookpacks weigh about 21 oz and carry 25-32 liters with thickly padded shoulder straps. LLB also has one like the REI flash that is 14 oz/22L; the big differences are the toughness of the material and thickness of straps. I am curious how important padded straps are for a daypack. with more weight you do want them wide, but does padding help an already-wide strap? I suppose it keeps it from folding on itself.

    Some bookpacks have a narrow (1") waistbelt, but in my experience, I don't think they transfer much weight to your hips, since they seldom have an internal frame of any substance. So the bag will just hang off your shoulders no matter what. So once or twice I've gotten sore shoulders even when using the waistbelt. Where the waistbelt might be useful is keeping the pack close to you as you do some rock-hopping. That way it d/n throw you off balance.

    A corded sack/pack can be fine as long as you're not carrying too much weight. You would think the cords would dig into your shoulders, but if your load is light enough and your clothing/jacket thick enough, it's actually no problem.

    IMO the big factor is how much water you have to carry.

  12. #12
    Registered User linus72's Avatar
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    i used the flash 18 for a while which is a great little pack but i moved up to the trail 25. it has these genius trekking pole holder clips on the exterior that no other pack in its price and feature range had, and is what sealed the deal for me besides the fact that it was half the price of all the others. just like when i bought my backpacking pack, i went into the store wanting an osprey or a gregory or other big brand, and then feature for feature the rei pack came in the winner for features and price for me personally. but anyway. the trail 25 also holds all my trail cleanup gear whereas i found the flash 18 a tad to small to carry that on top of my ten essentials.
    Doin' the trail one section at a time
    You can read about my adventures at
    http://happyonthetrails.wordpress.com/

  13. #13

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    Osprey. Osprey. Osprey. They make so many more versions than any other day pack manufacturer so that you can find the perfect one for your needs. High quality and durability.

  14. #14
    Registered User Tennessee Viking's Avatar
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    I recommend grabbing packs from Walmart and Target. They are cheap and you will have no worries if it gets sliced, cut, snagged, or torn. Or retire your older dayhike packs as your maintainer pack.

    I now have a Swiss hydration pack from Target. Just one big enough for 1L bladder, toiletries, lunch, and small compression bag for keys/wallet. Switched to a hyd pack because I got tired of carrying a large pack when weedeating or chainsawing trail projects.

    I also have what I think a Marmot's cheap version of their Kompressor pack which I got from a free giveaway. I have also gotten Walmarts Outdoor Products.

    I never take my good packs out maintaining.
    ''Tennessee Viking'
    Mountains to Sea Trail Maintainer
    Former TEHCC (AT) Maintainer
    Falls Lake Trail: 2011

  15. #15
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    i bought gossamer gear's new riksak 17 and its incredibly durable, have used it a whole bunch since buying it. have carried 15 pound loads with comfort. Only 4.5 oz.

  16. #16

  17. #17
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    Default

    Best day pack around....hands down...


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canebrake View Post
    Osprey. Osprey. Osprey. They make so many more versions than any other day pack manufacturer so that you can find the perfect one for your needs. High quality and durability.
    Osprey Daylite daypack, then you can attach it to your Aether.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tennessee Viking View Post
    I recommend grabbing packs from Walmart and Target. They are cheap and you will have no worries if it gets sliced, cut, snagged, or torn. Or retire your older dayhike packs as your maintainer pack.

    I now have a Swiss hydration pack from Target. Just one big enough for 1L bladder, toiletries, lunch, and small compression bag for keys/wallet. Switched to a hyd pack because I got tired of carrying a large pack when weedeating or chainsawing trail projects.

    I also have what I think a Marmot's cheap version of their Kompressor pack which I got from a free giveaway. I have also gotten Walmarts Outdoor Products.

    I never take my good packs out maintaining.
    A few years ago I bought a 15 liter day pack at Walmart for $3.95, and it had THICK shoulder straps. Unbelievable.

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