Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 21 to 32 of 32
  1. #21
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    18,011

    Default

    What Crocs do you have that weight 13 oz. Seems like a heavier pr?

    Rocking the WM Ultralite 20* the whole thru will be overkill. Yeah you could sleep on top of it or drape it over you or leave it unzipped but that's extra warmth, hence extra wt, you could lose by going to something lighter for the warmer months.

  2. #22
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    18,011

    Default

    Arc'teryx Beta LT will likely see little comfortable use for the AT during the warm humid months despite the Gore Tex Paclite. Might consider Gore Active tech if you're gung ho on Gore Tex tech. If you already have the Beta LT and don't desire to drop more rain jacket $ make it work. If still needing to buy a rain jacket you can do better than the Beta LT as far as durability, lower cost, lower wt, and greater breathability for a NOBO AT thru-hike. I'm a Arc'teryx apparel fan but for different apps than an AT thru the entire 2170. Jus my opinion as a thru-hiker. You'll get a zillion other differing opinions of what others advise.

  3. #23
    Registered User StubbleJumper's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-23-2007
    Location
    Constant Amazement
    Posts
    509

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    What Crocs do you have that weight 13 oz. Seems like a heavier pr?

    Rocking the WM Ultralite 20* the whole thru will be overkill. Yeah you could sleep on top of it or drape it over you or leave it unzipped but that's extra warmth, hence extra wt, you could lose by going to something lighter for the warmer months.

    Real Crocs are heavy like that. I like fake Crocs better because they are probably 5 or 6 oz lighter....but certainly lower quality and less durable. But if I can find the imitation MiC Crocs for $5, that's what I like to buy.

  4. #24
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    18,011

    Default

    13 oz for a pr of camp shoes is a high camp shoe wt. It exceeds the wt by double digit % of ONE of most of my low cut trail runners.

  5. #25
    Registered User ggreaves's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-13-2013
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Age
    53
    Posts
    190

    Default

    If you haven't purchased your gear yet (I see it's for 2018), might I suggest giving a hammock a try. I've attached a Big-3 comparison to your gear list for illustration purposes. Both setups can be made more or less bulky / pricey / heavy. This comparison is just to show you that it's easily doable from a weight / bulk / money point of view.

    Advantages of a hammock setup over a tent setup...

    - You sleep in the same position every night. No more sleeping on inclines because the shelter's full and there are no flat areas adjacent to the shelter.
    - You sleep high and dry every night. You won't get wet in your hammock even if a torrent is rushing down the hill and pooling up under your friends' tents.
    - In spite of what Franco thinks, condensation is almost never an issue in a hammock even on nights when all the tents around you are soaked inside. I've spent hundreds of nights in a hammock in all 4 seasons here in Canada in all sorts of weather (rain/sleet/snow/no hail yet) from -30C to 35C (-22F to 95F) and never had a problem.
    - You can sleep as warm as ground dwellers when it's cold
    - You can sleep much cooler on a hot night in a hammock than on the ground in a tent. Just leave the pad in your pack.
    - Level ground is not required. Just a couple of trees. You'll find a few of those on the trail.
    - Going to ground is always an option (above tree line) but many have hiked the entire AT never having to do that - other than staying in the odd shelter. Your hammock becomes a bug bivy in this scenario. Or just leave it in your pack and throw your pad on the ground under the tarp.
    - Bigger coverage footprint than a comparable tent vestibule for lounging, cooking, hanging out out of the elements with multiple tarp setups to maximize space, block wind or provide a nice wide open view to the outside world.
    - If you're comfortable, your sleep is restorative more consistently than when you sleep on the ground. This is important when trying to string together multiple big mile days.
    - Easier to leave no trace when you're not even on the ground. The tree straps you use in a hammock protect the bark of the trees you're hanging from.
    - Cottage vendor stuff has excellent resale value and you could most of your money back on the setup I quoted if it turns out not to be your thing.
    - If you keep your tarp in an outside pocket ready to deploy, you can set up an instant shelter anyplace in < 1 minute and keep the rest of your stuff dry while you're setting up camp.
    - Shelters or huts are still an option for you if you absolutely feel compelled to be with mice - you have an insulated pad and warm topquilt that will work fine in a shelter.
    - No critters. Bugnet keeps the bugs out and I haven't seen any rodents compelled enough to walk down my ridgeline and run across my face. I've had the odd racoon sniff my arse as he walks under the tarp, but I think it's just as unpleasant for him as it is for the general public so they keep walking. Many a tent dweller has had their tent chewed on but stuff living near shelters looking for an easy meal.

    Disadvantages ....

    - There's a bit of a learning curve to getting the hang right, getting the lay right and getting the insulation right. This normally requires a few attempts in your backyard or someplace with a bailout option (car camping or with a tent setup adjacent to the hammock) to get through the night. It took me 2 nights and since the 3rd night I haven't looked back. There's also help in the form of hammockforums.net - an online community of people who have steeped the learning curve and are quite happy to help out. Besides, you've got a year to figure this stuff out. It only takes a couple nights.
    - There can be more bulk or weight than a tent setup that is comparably priced. Careful equipment selection should minimize this. Even if there were a slight bulk / weight penalty the order of magnitude increase in comfort and sleep quality makes a hammock worth it i.m.h.o.
    - Because you sleep so well, your friends in tents will be up and packed up before you roll out of bed in the morning. You may need more self discipline to be an early riser. This may seem funny but its definitely a thing.

    Comments...

    - Site selection is less important in a hammock than for a tent but it's still as important to keep clear of widow-makers and definitely don't hang from them.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  6. #26
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-20-2013
    Location
    Upper East Side of Texas
    Age
    74
    Posts
    8,401

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kcholder View Post
    2EZ,

    Yea I have considered a two person and am fortunate to work at an outdoor store where I can test them out on a daily basis, just haven't decided 100% yet. I still may swap the Hubba NX for possibly the Hubba Hubba. Thanks!
    Last year I had the Hubba, Hubba Hubba, and both of the comparable Big Agnes tents lined up. Weighed them. Measured them. I bought the Hubba Hubba NX. I am glad that I did. Sure it's heavier, but it's way more comfortable. The doors on the Big Agnes turned me off. I'm really happy with the Hubba Hubba. Next would have been the Hubba. Oh, and the MSR tents allow use of the fly alone without needing the footprint.
    Cut weight some other way.
    Or man up.
    Wayne


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Eddie Valiant: "That lame-brain freeway idea could only be cooked up by a toon."
    https://wayne-ayearwithbigfootandbubba.blogspot.com
    FlickrMyBookTwitSpaceFace



  7. #27
    Registered User ggreaves's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-13-2013
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Age
    53
    Posts
    190

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ggreaves View Post
    I've attached a Big-3 comparison to your gear list for illustration purposes
    I have the price of the Arc Haul at 200 in the spreadsheet - it's actually 299.

  8. #28

    Default

    Good looking list, nice seeing a Memphis post on here.

  9. #29
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-20-2017
    Location
    Memphis, Tennessee
    Age
    27
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CarlZ993 View Post
    A few preference items will come up on gear lists. I prefer to use lightweight bottles instead of Camelbak hydration systems. Fewer moving parts to explode in your back & they weigh less. I'd prefer the Sawyer Squeeze over the Mini (faster flow but 1 oz more in weighty). I'd opt for a lighter headlamp (make up for the heavier filter). Moleskin, IMHO, is borderline worthless. There are other options mentioned in other posts. I'd opt to include a trash compactor bag lining my pack. I've never experienced that much rain in my life than I did on my AT hike. I was glad I had a bag liner.

    That being said, the gear doesn't make the hike. The hiker makes the hike. The gear can make it a little easier or harder. You get to hump your gear. Anyway, good luck in planning your hike. I hope all goes well when you finally hit the trail.
    Appreciate the info! I'm gonna look into the Sawyer Squeeze and potentially a lighter headlamp. Also been considering the trash compactor liner to save the weight of the pack cover. Thanks!

  10. #30
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-20-2017
    Location
    Memphis, Tennessee
    Age
    27
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Your call depending on how much you like to unpack and sprawl out but the Hubba NX has a large enough vestibule to store a pack with some stuff still in it and possibly cook under. Personally, if I have more than maybe one or two unworn apparel pieces or unused pieces that make for a large pack still I think I'm carrying too much once camp is set up.

    How about a start date?
    March 5th, 2018!

  11. #31
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-20-2017
    Location
    Memphis, Tennessee
    Age
    27
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Arc'teryx Beta LT will likely see little comfortable use for the AT during the warm humid months despite the Gore Tex Paclite. Might consider Gore Active tech if you're gung ho on Gore Tex tech. If you already have the Beta LT and don't desire to drop more rain jacket $ make it work. If still needing to buy a rain jacket you can do better than the Beta LT as far as durability, lower cost, lower wt, and greater breathability for a NOBO AT thru-hike. I'm a Arc'teryx apparel fan but for different apps than an AT thru the entire 2170. Jus my opinion as a thru-hiker. You'll get a zillion other differing opinions of what others advise.
    All the clothing I have listed is stuff I currently own. Working at an Outdoors retailer has given me the opportunity to stock up on all that stuff over the past 3 years. The Beta LT definitely is a little too heavy and overkill I think, but trying to save a few bucks as well by using stuff I already have. Still might look into the OR Helium II though!

  12. #32
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-20-2017
    Location
    Memphis, Tennessee
    Age
    27
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by memphistiger02 View Post
    Good looking list, nice seeing a Memphis post on here.
    Thanks! Awesome to see someone else from Memphis as well. Definitely not the most outdoor friendly place other than paddling, but nonetheless it's awesome to see someone else from the Memphis area.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
++ New Posts ++

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •