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  1. #1

    Default Ok... another gear list for 7'3" hiker

    https://www.geargrams.com/list?id=37822 (Not 100% ready yet)

    Hi everyone!

    Let me start by saying that I am looking forward to meeting everyone on the trail! I will be leaving between March 15 and March 25th from Springer Mountain (NOBO).

    I am trying to go as light as possible. This is hard to do when all your gear has to be custom made for me. I am 7'3" and I can't buy anything off the shelf. And if you are tall yourself I would love to know what clothes you got.

    Please let me know what you think of my list, I look forward to learning from everyone to make improvements.

    Thanks,

    Flutch aka The Flying Dutchman.

  2. #2

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    What about shoes?
    Have you planned on how to replace those?
    Most places to buy shoes along the trail won't have your size...Plus feet so big might grow more than 1 size which is typical for a thru hiker
    I remember you from your NC Tarheel basketball days
    Just think of how your career would have been different if "Sheed didn't block your progress!
    I really hope to meet you out there! Are you going to Trail Days?
    I will be shuttling back from Trent's Grocery/Bland, VA area or thereabouts!

  3. #3

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    Shoes are not an issue. Items I have custom are raingear, sleeping bag, down jacket, and pants. I need some long shirts and possibly a lightweight fleece.

    Yes, I will be going to Trail Days! Sheed was a great player, not regretting anything! I get to Hike the AT!

    I am also interested in people giving feedback in the rest of my gear.

    Flutch

  4. #4

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    I feel like your gloves are too heavy
    Try Zpacks possum down gloves with the Challenger mitts over them

  5. #5

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    Since you already have the down Jacket, consider reducing the fleece jacket to say a Patagonia Thermal Weight Capilene Hoody, they make XXL, I don't know if 7'3" will fit in this but it's a versatile midlayer for an AT Thru

  6. #6

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    Hey,

    Let me tell you about my 8 oz custom hammock:

    Material: https://ripstopbytheroll.com/product...-ripstop-nylon

    Hanging Line: 2 Amsteel 7/64 Whoopie Hooks
    On the drop down menu have to select the Amsteal 7/64...
    https://www.dutchwaregear.com/big-carl-pack-hanger.html

    The weight of my hammock and the material to hang it onto tree and the stuff sack is: 225 grams (8oz)

    But it's only 9'5" by 68" I'm assuming you'd need more length, like 12 feet? For reference I am 240LBs and 5'9".
    This way to hang a hammock slices up trees pretty badly. To alleviate damage I have placed sticks between the cord and the tree.
    My hammock setup if for napping and occasionally sleeping. I've not done a thru hike with it. Just an overnight....12782495_593435080807131_1014921591_n.jpg
    I'd recommend checking out Hammock Forums/Hammocking area on WhiteBlaze etc to make sure.
    Purple with yellow stitching is regal, isn't it?


    Also let me recommend that you look into a tiny knife/pen combo...
    On ebay can find them used for like $8. Here's a cheesy video of the Signature: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g_r7SLG6f-g&t=10s


    Victorinox Signature Swiss Army Knife(Scissors,file,pen, tweezers) Weighs 23 grams
    Good luck to you,
    Miguelon

  7. #7

    Default

    Hey,

    Similar to the Patagonia Hoody... but less form fitting is the Melanzana Microgrid Hoody. You might could ask 'em to make a custom one for you.... Not sure if they would or not. But price is a lot lower than Patagonia. My XXL Micro grid Hoody from them weights 363 grams.

    http://melanzana.com/catalog/product...products_id/34

    Miguelon

  8. #8

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    I will definitely be checking out the Melanzana Microgrid Hoody & Patagonia Thermal Weight Capilene Hoody to see if this would work for me. The Zpacks possum down gloves with the Challenger mitts might work for me. I just emailed Zpack and hope to hear back from the soon.

    Thanks everyone!

    Flutch

  9. #9

    Default

    Have you read Skywalker's books? He's pretty tall, I think just shy of 7 foot. I met him in NC on his AT hike. Nothing fit the poor guy.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
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    Georgia and Hawaii
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    14,736

    Default

    Hey Serge. I'm only 6'4" 220. Most of what's on your body and non consumables - gear- is going to be of comparatively higher wt just for the larger sizes needed to fit. Hence, the gear wt will be higher than someone as short as myself. LOL.

    Nearly everyone focuses incessantly on carrying less wt by looking only at gear wt. Everyone loves to talk about their gear. I can do it too.

    Where I strongly suspect you have vast potential in reducing the wt you carry it is consumables - mostly food and water. Consumables are fuel, food, water. Consider 1 liter of H20 weighs about 1 kilogram(2.2 lbs). That means for every extra 1 liter of water you unnecessarily carry that adds 2.2 lbs to unnecessary wt you are carrying. LEARN very good water management. It's not hard nor is does it have to be unsafe. In your AT Thru-Hiker Companion it lists reliable water sources. Use that with the knowledge that at nearly all AT lean-to shelters there will be water. Use your observations about how you hike and how much water you might need for better water logistics IE; reduce the amount of unnecessary water wt you haul!

    Most long distance - thru-hikers - carry between 1.5 - 2 lbs of food per day. Being you're so big and an athlete you're going to likely be on the high side of that range if not a bit more food wt per day. This is not Tar Heels b-ball for Dean Smith, rest his soul. Consider a diet higher in % of calories from "good fats" in your total daily caloric intake. Thru-hiking is a like an adventurous job of 14 hrs per day. You're going to burn upwards of 6,ooo calories/day.

    Consider resupplying more often as well so that you get the daily nutrition, including calories per day, but lower the food wt hauled between resupplying. Many sources listing what food is available where on the AT or close to it. Again, the Tru-Hiker Companion lists where groceries will be found. Consider supplementing food along the way too to help lighten the for wt haul. If you lower the food and water wt hauls your knees and back will thank you for it.

    Go out smooth. Flow. Nothing to prove to anyone else. You're a Level 10 person. Don't go out too quick too far. Work your way into trail life. It's probably new to you. Observe. Learn. Consider. Assimilate what you feel needs to be applied. Adapt. The AT is a wonderful journey. AND, thru-hiking is NOT just about hiking. It's a joyous journey of adapting to new comfort zones and new experiences.

    Enjoy.

    Glad to see you're getting out there. Don't bump your head on any low tree branches and ESPECIALLy(NOT funny!) AT lean to roofs. Some have sharp pointed rusted corners on tin roofing.

    Great game in 95 I saw you in with Steakhouse. Remember like it was only a few yrs ago. Time flies.

  11. #11
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    09-06-2008
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    Andrews, NC
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    3,548

    Default

    Taller = longer legs = longer strides = more distance covered per day?

  12. #12
    Registered User egilbe's Avatar
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    Skywalker always had trouble staying warm. Taller=more surface area to cool the core. A lot of body heat is lost through the head and neck area, as well as the hands, wrists and knees. You will need to take steps to ensure you have adequate insulation for those areas that regular sized clothing is going to miss. Neck gaiters and wristies as well as mittens will come in handy for you, even with a Late March start.

    Just something to keep in mind.

  13. #13
    Registered User
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    02-01-2016
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    Chattanooga, Tennessee
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    Flutch, is it safe to assume you have hammock camped enough times to know that you are able to get comfortable and sleep well? It seems most do, but I'm one of those who, on balance, prefers the ground (though I gave it a good try). It really helps if you are a back sleeper, though it's not strictly necessary. Most importantly, I hope you have gone out several nights in varying conditions (incl. setup in rain) to verify that it is suitable for you.

    Another thing that came to mind was, would your setup benefit from something like a polycryo ground sheet? I see you have a therm-a-rest seat, and you could put your pack on that (it would hang off but maybe still off the ground), but there's also the matter of required use of shelters in GSMNP, and, unless you intentionally arrive late so you can pretty much ensure that the shelters will be full -so you can set up outside of them - you might want something to put under your hammock if you have to lay it out on a shelter (and by using an underquilt, you'll have no effective bottom insulation if you have to use a shelter or otherwise go-to-ground). As you probably know, polycryo is basically a thin, light, tear-resistant clear film that is sold (among other places) at Lowes and Home Depot as window insulation film. For your height you'd want to get a big sheet (IIRC the sizes are 42" x 62" and 62" x 210") and cut to size. I have a piece I use under my 30 sf, 2P Microlight tent, and it weighs only 0.09 oz (42 grams). It's tough, dries quickly and shakes off well. A bit slippery, though, and it's so light that you have to weigh it down quickly when deploying in windy conditions!

    Bic lighter - some carry a second one as backup (or some matches/firesteel), in case the first one malfunctions or the button gets held down and it discharges its fuel/propellant.

    Compass? Usu. not needed, but usually ≠ always. I see your pack has a whistle, that's good.

    Is your pack fully waterproof? If not, you need a way to keep your sleeping bag and underquilt dry. A trash compactor bag is light, cheap, durable, and effective.

    You list "custom down jacket for cold night - 6.9 oz" - that's extraordinarily light. Any idea what is the temp comfort rating of that is? I suppose if it's just as supplemental sleepwear it d/n matter, and/or you can wrap your bag or underquilt around yourself a bit as needed when, say, you're stopped and making dinner. Still - I have to wonder how effective something that light could be. Obviously depends on what you expect of it.

    Amt of water etc - reliable water sources weren't so reliable in 2nd half of 2016 due to drought. Be sure to verify as you plan ahead.

    One last thought - you say you want to go as light as possible. Let me play Devil's advocate - why is that your objective function? One could, instead, have as an objective function to maximize one's enjoyment. There could be an optimal weight associated with that, which might differ from the lightest weight possible. Something that balances the benefits to one's body of carrying less, with the enjoyment from bringing things that add to comfort (for instance, that improve sleep, or improve your ability to keep warm/dry - or cool, depending on time of year). In a way you're already doing this - after all, you could go lighter without hiking poles, right? Even the iphone and accessories ... not strictly necessary. Now, I'm not sure what might improve your experience by adding to "lightest possible weight" - perhaps nothing more than these very things - but it's food for thought.

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Miguelon View Post
    Hey,

    Let me tell you about my 8 oz custom hammock:

    Material: https://ripstopbytheroll.com/product...-ripstop-nylon

    Hanging Line: 2 Amsteel 7/64 Whoopie Hooks
    On the drop down menu have to select the Amsteal 7/64...
    https://www.dutchwaregear.com/big-carl-pack-hanger.html

    The weight of my hammock and the material to hang it onto tree and the stuff sack is: 225 grams (8oz)

    But it's only 9'5" by 68" I'm assuming you'd need more length, like 12 feet? For reference I am 240LBs and 5'9".
    This way to hang a hammock slices up trees pretty badly. To alleviate damage I have placed sticks between the cord and the tree.
    My hammock setup if for napping and occasionally sleeping. I've not done a thru hike with it. Just an overnight....12782495_593435080807131_1014921591_n.jpg
    I'd recommend checking out Hammock Forums/Hammocking area on WhiteBlaze etc to make sure.
    Purple with yellow stitching is regal, isn't it?


    Also let me recommend that you look into a tiny knife/pen combo...
    On ebay can find them used for like $8. Here's a cheesy video of the Signature: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g_r7SLG6f-g&t=10s


    Victorinox Signature Swiss Army Knife(Scissors,file,pen, tweezers) Weighs 23 grams
    Good luck to you,
    Miguelon
    Please don't take this as preaching but you really need to invest in some tree hugger straps to protect the trees. It is because of people not using tree straps and tearing up trees that hammocks get banned. Please and thank you

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by egilbe View Post
    Skywalker always had trouble staying warm. Taller=more surface area to cool the core.
    Just something to keep in mind.
    Yep, I was with Skywalker at Sassafras Gap shelter on a really cold night and he froze even after wrapping himself in a space blanket.

    I suppose there is a reason you want to start in March, but waiting four weeks and starting in mid April would help reduce the pack weight since the weather will be significantly milder and that reduces the need for heavier clothes.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  16. #16
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-01-2016
    Location
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
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    316

    Default

    Flutch, also please note the info in this thread about wildfire damaged areas in NC:

    https://whiteblaze.net/forum/showthre...dfire-overview

    particularly note the cautions about damage to trees, since you will rely upon them for hammock hanging, or which may be close enough to pose a hazard. You're going to really need to be vigilant about checking for widow-makers and be wary in storms. It may be wiser to plan to stay in shelters until you get out of the higher-risk zones - and pack accordingly (earplugs, sleeping pad, perhaps an anti-mouse bivy). You can always ship stuff back home after you finish this part of the trail, and have your hammock setup shipped ahead to you for pickup at that time.

  17. #17
    Registered User
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    06-17-2015
    Location
    Orwell, New York
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    31
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    I am 7' 1/2" tall, 200 pounds and made my own fleece jacket and leggings for canoeing and camping. I could never find anything that was long enough in the sleeves for me without being 2-3 times as big around as I am. I got some fleece that had a fuzzy side and a hard smooth side. I found it in a dollar store that sells closeouts and such, so I could never find out what it is called but it works very well because the smooth side does not pick up dirt easily and the fuzzy side on the inside is warm and comfortable.
    Zach

  18. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-01-2016
    Location
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
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    Default

    PS, dead/dying tree risk is not just limited to fire damage areas - severe to extraordinary drought affected a much wider area.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by DuneElliot View Post
    Please don't take this as preaching but you really need to invest in some tree hugger straps to protect the trees. It is because of people not using tree straps and tearing up trees that hammocks get banned. Please and thank you
    Dutch-Kevlar-21-gram-straps----will-do

  20. #20
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    14,736

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by egilbe View Post
    Skywalker always had trouble staying warm. Taller=more surface area to cool the core. A lot of body heat is lost through the head and neck area, as well as the hands, wrists and knees. You will need to take steps to ensure you have adequate insulation for those areas that regular sized clothing is going to miss. Neck gaiters and wrists as well as mittens will come in handy for you, even with a Late March start....
    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    Yep, I was with Skywalker at Sassafras Gap shelter on a really cold night and he froze even after wrapping himself in a space blanket...
    Being of larger surface area(large athletic person) may factor into warmth but not the only reason. Bill "Skywalker" is a bright observant amenable adapting individual. He was(is?) an accountant and stock trader. The few times I met him I always enjoyed the conversation. He knew he needed to eat more food wt per day and eat a higher % of daily calories from "good fats." Paraphrasing, as I remember him saying it, he developed his trail diets to carry more food wt per day, possibly resupplying more often to lower food wt hauls(I suggested this to him as well), and increased his good fat(Another suggestion to him that he heartedly agreed with) and protein content. He knew since he wasn't fueling the furnace adequately he was prone to losing muscle mass. In having a few discussion's with Bill I mentioned it might be why he was also cold at times.

    It's why I said above "most long distance - thru-hikers - carry between 1.5 - 2 lbs of food per day. Being you're so big and an athlete you're going to likely be on the high side of that range if not a bit more food wt per day... Consider a diet higher in % of calories from "good fats" in your total daily caloric intake. Thru-hiking is a like an adventurous job of 14 hrs per day. You're going to burn upwards of 6,ooo calories/day.

    Consider resupplying more often as well so that you get the daily nutrition, including calories per day, but lower the food wt hauled between resupplying. Many sources listing what food is available where on the AT or close to it. Again, the Tru-Hiker Companion lists where groceries will be found. Consider supplementing food along the way too to help lighten the for wt haul. If you lower the food and water wt hauls your knees and back will thank you for it."

    I followed International European pro basketball for a while with acquaintances, previous team mates, and competitors drafted, assistant coaches and trainers being some folks I knew. I liked scouting out Olympic U.S. Basketball Team opponents too. Serge, if I'm recalling correctly, had some knee or back medical issues on one of those teams.

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