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  1. #1

    Default Clothing troubles

    I'm starting my thru-hike mid February and am fairly used to cold weather but i'm having trouble deciding exactly what clothes to take. So far I have 2 pairs of spanks- my underwear. 2 pairs of darn tough socks for hiking, 1 pair wool socks for sleep. Two sports bras, again 1 for hiking and 1 for camp. Two pairs of insulated leggings (thinking maybe one for hiking and one to use as camp clothes?) Will probably swap one pair for shorts come warmer weather. Two cold weather nike half zip long sleeve shirts (Should I wear a tank top underneath for another layer??). Patagonia puffy jacket. And lastly deciding between Frogg Toggs as my wind/rain shell or a rain poncho. Any tips, suggestions or replacements?? Open to any and all ideas or comments, thank you!

  2. #2

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    I like the Frogg Toggs, but also switched my last trip to a rain kilt that worked out very well when we hit some weather. For the light weight of the Frogg Toggs, you may want to just bring the rain pants along and use them as wind pants if you are camped or hiking in a cold windy environment.
    Whether you think you can, or think you can't--you're right--Henry Ford; The Journey Is The Destination

  3. #3

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    I also have a beanie and warm gloves that I didn't mention.

    But thank you Turk6177- I was thinking for sure I'd want the pants especially if it got windy.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeeMarieVarner View Post
    . . . deciding between Frogg Toggs as my wind/rain shell or a rain poncho. . .
    1) I'm not a big fan of "camp cloths" as I don't spend much time in camp, they add weight to my pack, and changing into them is one more thing I have to do before I get to crawl into my bag or under my quilt to sleep.
    2) I am a big poncho fan because it will keep both me and my pack dry while allowing enough air flow so that I don't struggle with moisture from sweating. A poncho also works as a small portable tent so you can look at a map or eat dry food by sticking your head into your poncho at rest stops. They are also warm to cover yourself up in a sitting position if you are taking a break while it is raining. The also double as extra shelter (or, for me, often my only shelter) so cooking or otherwise working around camp in the rain is more protected that without the extra "tarp". Finally, the right poncho can be < 7 oz in weight providing extremely light combination of rainwear, pack cover, and shelter all in one.

    To make a poncho work, you need to tie it around your waist when the wind is blowing hard, and you need to be okay with either your lower legs getting wet or adding rain chaps or pants to your kit (still dryer than a rain jacket alone).

    A poncho is the only rain-gear I have found where can hike vigorously and not get wet from the inside (and I'm not a heavy sweater). In long days of rain I get damp inside the poncho, but also dry out quickly while moving. In any rain jacket, in long days of rain, I get damp inside and don't dry out until I take the rain-gear off, and that get's darn cold while making camp or stopping to eat lunch, or it leaves me with wet cloths to deal with as I'm crawling into bed.
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  5. #5
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    You should definitely layer up. It's easy to add or take away layers as your body temp changes.

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  6. #6
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    I have not found a need for a second sports bra. I do like changing out of my base layer and into my fleece when I get to camp in winter, but my sports bra has never been sweaty enough to matter.

    Socks, yes.

    I carry two pairs of leggings and will sometimes change into one or the other, depending on weather or camp.

    In very cold weather, I wear all of the layers except one of the socks which is exclusively for camp. But the fleece layer should never get soaked.

    I also wear shorts over my leggings.


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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by nsherry61 View Post
    1) I'm not a big fan of "camp cloths" as I don't spend much time in camp, they add weight to my pack, and changing into them is one more thing I have to do before I get to crawl into my bag or under my quilt to sleep.
    2) I am a big poncho fan because it will keep both me and my pack dry while allowing enough air flow so that I don't struggle with moisture from sweating. A poncho also works as a small portable tent so you can look at a map or eat dry food by sticking your head into your poncho at rest stops. They are also warm to cover yourself up in a sitting position if you are taking a break while it is raining. The also double as extra shelter (or, for me, often my only shelter) so cooking or otherwise working around camp in the rain is more protected that without the extra "tarp". Finally, the right poncho can be < 7 oz in weight providing extremely light combination of rainwear, pack cover, and shelter all in one.

    To make a poncho work, you need to tie it around your waist when the wind is blowing hard, and you need to be okay with either your lower legs getting wet or adding rain chaps or pants to your kit (still dryer than a rain jacket alone).

    A poncho is the only rain-gear I have found where can hike vigorously and not get wet from the inside (and I'm not a heavy sweater). In long days of rain I get damp inside the poncho, but also dry out quickly while moving. In any rain jacket, in long days of rain, I get damp inside and don't dry out until I take the rain-gear off, and that get's darn cold while making camp or stopping to eat lunch, or it leaves me with wet cloths to deal with as I'm crawling into bed.
    +1 (except that I've not tried it as a shelter)

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