Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 33
  1. #1
    Registered User Glacier's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-20-2014
    Location
    Waukesha, wi
    Age
    35
    Posts
    84

    Default Hood vs no hood puffy

    Do you prefer a puffy with or without a hood? Why?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    05-05-2011
    Location
    state of confusion
    Posts
    9,869
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    Depends on if I plant to sleep with it.
    My 5.9 exlight, has no hood because its really for 35+ ish temps, 3 season use and I layer it with a fleece hoody I can hike in, and fleece beanie and have a down hood handy too
    My heavier winter jacket for <30F temps has a hood. I dont skimp on insulation below freezing and dont plan to sleep in it.

    Now...do you intend to sleep it it and use hood as part of sleep system?

    I would caution against this except occassionaly when necessary, because you down hood sucks up grease from hair and gets really flat, really fast. Only a few days and its more or less substantially compromised.

    Im about to wash a down hood, and will take before after pics, just like I did for a 20F quilt a while back. It probably has 1/2" loft. Ive managed to get almost all my down washed during this holiday break.

    But thats me.
    As a general rule....hoods are good.
    Last edited by MuddyWaters; 01-02-2017 at 18:07.

  3. #3

    Default

    Both have their place. If its not cold, I use a hoodless jacket with hat. It affords freedom of motion and better peripheral vision than a hood allows. When its really, really cold I used a hood. Just seems warmer and it covers the back of my neck and probably limits heat escaping from the neck of the jacket.

  4. #4
    Registered User G-FOURce's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-20-2012
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    496

    Default

    I typically only camp down to the upper teens and for those temps I haven't needed a hood. I have beanies that cover my ears and my body throws off a ton of heat so I have never had issues in or out of my sleeping bag.

  5. #5

    Default

    Hood for me.

  6. #6
    Hiker bigcranky's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-22-2002
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Age
    58
    Posts
    7,896
    Images
    296

    Default

    I always like a puffy with a hood - doesn't add much weight but it does add a lot of warmth around the head and neck.

    However, I just got an Enlightened Equipment quilt and bought one of their hoods to go with it. So now I don't really need a hood on my puffy jacket. So I might change what I carry.
    Ken B
    'Big Cranky'
    Our Long Trail journal

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-31-2007
    Location
    Nashville,TN
    Posts
    125

    Default

    For winter use I see value in a hood

    For all other conditions I think it is unnecessary but not problematic

  8. #8
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-20-2013
    Location
    Upper East Side of Texas
    Age
    74
    Posts
    8,317

    Default

    I own WM sleeping bags. I would never insult my bags by introducing another hood. Besides, I have numerous layers: hats, headbands, balaclavas, etc. that I can mix and match in the bag.
    Be careful. I was in my Antelope one night and I mistakenly put on the wrong hat (probably wool) and closed the hood and collar. I woke up with a soaked head. I dried my head and put on my lightest fleece beanie. Closed everything up and went back to sleep.
    Stay dry. Stay warm.
    Wayne


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Eddie Valiant: "That lame-brain freeway idea could only be cooked up by a toon."
    https://wayne-ayearwithbigfootandbubba.blogspot.com
    FlickrMyBookTwitSpaceFace



  9. #9

    Default

    I prefer no hood cause I use a number of other things that allow me to add/boc, but no doubt they are super warm when warm is what ya want.

  10. #10

    Default

    I can't speak about a hooded puffy but have some recent experience with the Patagonia thermal-weight capilene midlayer top which now accompanies me on every backpacking trip. Except for my hooded rain jacket, I went almost 40 years without carrying any clothing with a hood (save for my down parka hood) and never thought I needed one, BUT I DO!


    Here's my thermal hoody in the mountains of NC. The hood dispenses with the balaclava and works well over either a tuque hat as above or over your regular baseball cap. Plus, the hood can be removed for sweat management as the neck zipper can be opened. It's a great midlayer winter system and outperforms merino wool tops both in weight and sweating---as in dealing with sweat better.

    All in all, I'd say get whatever puffy you can with a hood. Oh and I sleep in my hoody too and the hood keeps my turtle fur hat securely on top of my head as I toss and turn.

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-01-2014
    Location
    Norwell, MA
    Age
    58
    Posts
    2,207

    Default

    I really don't like hoods when I'm moving. I don't like the interference with my vision and hearing. But, hoods contribute significantly to warmth, so if I take my puffy, I do have a hood on it. I also have a hood on my rain poncho, although, I almost always use a hat instead of the hood.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  12. #12

    Default

    Depends on what I'm doing. For backpacking or activities with high output I prefer no hood. I'm a hiker not a camper. For belaying, winter fishing, etc, more static activities, I want a hood.

    There's at least one other category you're not considering...a puffy with a detachable hood.

  13. #13
    Registered User Engine's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-29-2009
    Location
    Citrus Springs, FL
    Age
    54
    Posts
    1,673
    Images
    10

    Default

    I use a down jacket without a hood, just don't like them and when I make a balaclava out of my Buff and add a fleece cap over that, I'm good down into some miserable temperatures. My wife likes the hood, especially at night inside her quilt, but she's a very cold sleeper.
    “He is richest who is content with the least, for content is the wealth of nature.” –Socrates

  14. #14
    Registered User tagg's Avatar
    Join Date
    08-03-2009
    Location
    greenwood, sc
    Age
    47
    Posts
    281

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Offshore View Post
    Both have their place. If its not cold, I use a hoodless jacket with hat. It affords freedom of motion and better peripheral vision than a hood allows. When its really, really cold I used a hood. Just seems warmer and it covers the back of my neck and probably limits heat escaping from the neck of the jacket.

    I have one of each and use the same reasoning when deciding which one to pack.
    -tagg

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Depends on what I'm doing. For backpacking or activities with high output I prefer no hood. I'm a hiker not a camper.
    I think for backpacking in frigid temps like 10F or 0F a capilene or fleece or whatever hood is perfect for the actual act of hiking. As mentioned, it allows for great temperature adjustments while moving; as in removing or putting on while moving.

    And your bold quote comes from way out of left field. All backpackers both hike and camp, period. But wait, let's analyze your "I'm a hiker not a camper" quote. To me it can only mean one thing---you are a dayhiker who never camps. Okay, I can support that. Otherwise all backpackers both hike and camp. Oh and in my above pic I was . . . wait for it . . . actually hiking. And using a hood while doing it! Oops.

  16. #16
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-18-2016
    Location
    Sudley, VA
    Posts
    713
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    1

    Default

    No hood. I carry a SpecOps neck gaiter/buff to keep the elements off of my head, neck, ears, cheeks and a fleece watch cap if I need it. Both items can be saturated and wrung out to get rid of sweat and funk.
    Hiking is the best teacher, it grades on a curve.
    AT miles: 255.5 / Total miles: 905.27

    Author of "Hiking Into Trail Days"



  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    I think for backpacking in frigid temps like 10F or 0F a capilene or fleece or whatever hood is perfect for the actual act of hiking. As mentioned, it allows for great temperature adjustments while moving; as in removing or putting on while moving.
    Yes, I agree that various hoods are outstanding for quick temperature modification. Wouldn't really have a down hood for that unless it was pretty damn cold though

    So for the OPs question about puffy hoods.. it really depends on your setup and the temps. If you have a cap and your sleeping bag has head insulation... you might not want/need it if you already have a hood on something like a shell/waterproof coat anyway. It can work either way, as long as you think about whether or not you have adequate head/neck insulation for the situation, night & day

  18. #18

    Default

    I do no hood because my head is generally sweaty and I don't want to get the down wet. I prefer to just wear a merino wool buff.
    Whether you think you can, or think you can't--you're right--Henry Ford; The Journey Is The Destination

  19. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    I think for backpacking in frigid temps like 10F or 0F a capilene or fleece or whatever hood is perfect for the actual act of hiking. As mentioned, it allows for great temperature adjustments while moving; as in removing or putting on while moving.

    And your bold quote comes from way out of left field. All backpackers both hike and camp, period. But wait, let's analyze your "I'm a hiker not a camper" quote. To me it can only mean one thing---you are a dayhiker who never camps. Okay, I can support that. Otherwise all backpackers both hike and camp. Oh and in my above pic I was . . . wait for it . . . actually hiking. And using a hood while doing it! Oops.

    Why can't a beanie also just as easily be adjusted, put on or taken off, while moving? Store it on the side pocket of your pack....easy peasy.

    My statement that I'm more of a hiker than a camper simply refers to the approach that I spend more time, much more time, up to 14-16 hrs each hiking day/hiking period actually moving...not sitting around or having a camp set up or engaging in undue chatting. i.e; I camp out of necessity with the main goal to be moving rather than camping. It's not out of left field because if I spend more time moving I'm generating heat which directly relates to my previous posts of not being static/as static. It's a higher level of exertion

    Andrew Skurka says it well:

    "I wrote this book from the perspective of an unapologetic Ultimate Hiker, which I define as a backpacker who simply loves to walk. We maximize our on-trail comfort by packing light; we move efficiently from dawn to dusk; and we consider the physical and mental challenges inherent in this style as part of our backcountry experience. Our antithesis is the Ultimate Camper, who hikes only a very short distance in order to do something else, like fishing, journaling, or birding. Neither approach is superior to the other--it's simply personal preference--but our contrasting styles have major consequences for our gear, supplies, and skills."

  20. #20

    Default

    FWIW, I enjoy camping but that's not usually my main goal. IT CAN BE THOUGH.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •