Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 21 to 25 of 25
  1. #21
    Registered User
    Join Date
    01-05-2017
    Location
    Corpus Christi, Tx
    Age
    56
    Posts
    40

    Default

    You can buy a square Nesco dehydrator from Amazon from @ 60 bucks... i have one and love it.. i buy potatoes on sale, slice or dice, blanch and dry them. Also big bags of frozen vegetables... just spread them on the racks and turn it on at the mfr recommended settings.. same with fruits.. you may need to dip them in lemon juice to prevent browning, but no trouble to do so. i have not yet tried jerky, but will before my first AT attempt..
    I will, some point in the future buy a freeze dryer and then can bring complete meals on the trail


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. #22
    In the shadows AfterParty's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-11-2016
    Location
    Norton, Kansas
    Age
    37
    Posts
    486
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    12

    Default

    Cabelas sells the Cadillac of dh and you can pick them up refurbished in the bargain cave at pretty much every store for a great price.
    Hiking the AT is “pointless.” What life is not “pointless”? Is it not pointless to work paycheck to paycheck just to conform?.....I want to make my life less ordinary. AWOL

  3. #23
    Registered User
    Join Date
    05-12-2017
    Location
    San Antonio, Texas
    Age
    31
    Posts
    13

    Default

    I've done chili and spaghetti in the oven with good results.

  4. #24

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wil View Post
    I do onions at 130F and I wouldn't expect a total failure at 140, though I would never actually do such a thing. But 150 is just too high, no matter what some directions told you; that's cooking the onions not drying them.

    If I could afford the storage space I'd build an Alton Brown dehydrator. Room temperature and mass quantities of moving air: that's the ideal dehydration. Short of that, get a dehydrator with the most efficient fan you can afford and keep the temperatures low.
    Agree with low temps. I think the ideal temps to dry food is between 105F and 115F---critical temps for preserving enzymes etc. Not meat, of course. See---

    http://www.raw-food-diet-magazine.co...rate-food.html

    Quote Originally Posted by Hosh View Post
    I would wait and get a dehydrator, most of the dehydration action is air flow not heat. Heat is needed, but airflow is what will eliminate the moisture.

    BTW, onions are an item I won't dehydrate since they are so cheap to buy.
    Yes, really agree with this. Oven dehydrating is inefficient and offers a tiny space for large-volume drying. And if you're a backpacker planning to prepare all your cooked meals by drying, well, you'll want the most square footage you can get with a dehydrator.

    Quote Originally Posted by AfterParty View Post
    Cabelas sells the Cadillac of dh and you can pick them up refurbished in the bargain cave at pretty much every store for a great price.
    Don't know about Cabela's dryer, but for the last 10 years I've been using (heavily) a TSM D-5 model in stainless steel. I recently upgraded to the D-10 and it's perfect for preparing all my meals in just a couple days before a trip. The beast is linked below.

    All components on this machine can be replaced cheaply, like the fan motor and the heating element etc.

    http://www.meatprocessingproducts.com/32609.html


  5. #25

    Default

    The local Walmart will have big bags of Vidalia onions on sale at times. I buy the bag and do run of them in my dehydrator. Problem is they are so good most of them get eaten as snack food !

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •