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  1. #1
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    Default Tarp pitches in winter

    What's the best pitch for an 8x10 silnylon tarp in winter. I will be using a bivy and but would like to completely enclose it but I don't want more stress then I need to have on the tabs. Is this size difficult size to use for this purpose. I'm having trouble wrapping my head around it. Thank you


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  2. #2

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    If the tarp surface is steep, the snow will slide off, maybe with a small poke. Try an A frame pitch to start.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

  3. #3

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    https://www.pinterest.com/pin/105342078757793422/

    Have you seen this method? The chord takes most of the stress, not the grommets

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    Quote Originally Posted by Feral Bill View Post
    If the tarp surface is steep, the snow will slide off, maybe with a small poke. Try an A frame pitch to start.
    Fair enough. I can somewhat close the ends with an a-frame pitch. I'm just trying to figure out the best steepest way to have just one entry


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  5. #5
    Registered User Just Bill's Avatar
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    Just replied to your PM, lol.

    You can improve an A-frame with the basic "door" fold that many hammock hangers use... shown pretty well here and with an 8x10 should leave you 6' of floor space remaining.

    http://theultimatehang.com/wp-conten...uare-Tarps.png

    You can see the basic fold just under the RL lengths (stake out the sides about 2' in from each corner instead of at each corner to create the door flaps).

    Didn't notice it when I sent you the PM but this little guide also has a basic picture of a helpful idea- Shown in here as the "flat top diamond pitch".

    In An A-frame pitch you can basically do this by running a pair of Ridgelines then separating them about 18" with a found stick. If you offset them a bit (not a true flat top) usually all but the heaviest snows will fall off and your head room is greatly improved. You may have to get slightly creative if you want true doors with that method.

    Sky's the limit (or origami/imagination really)- but like I said in the PM- keep it simple- that's the point of tarps really. Most of the rest is just party tricks and good fun unless you have a huge multi-person tarp you're trying to pitch.

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  9. #9
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    There, I got it on my third attempt.

    It's basically a slightly modified half mid configuration...half mid with wings.

    Winter can mean snow, swirling winds, slush, wet ground, greater exposure, and perhaps more time in camp or hanging around in my shelter not sleeping. Under such conditions I like a pitch of a 8 x 10 that shelters on 3 sides but gives me room to fully sit up and possibly move around and not have to crawl to get into or under the tarp. I'm a tall person. I much prefer entering from the side of my sleeping direction rather than head on too. As typical the side wall is pitched into the main direction of the wind. The entrance flaps get folded in beyond a 90* corner the greater the swirling winds. Pitch height is lowered/raised depending on how much snowload, wind is encountered, and the desired floor area and dimensions. Prefer this over the low pitches of A Frames with the foot lowered to the ground into the wind.

    The config JB was referring to that hangers sometimes use in inclement weather is OK too but greater care to ventilate is required. It's really closed.

    I stay away from tarps with grommets as a general rule but especially in winter as the grommet holes can ice up and the wind and snow loads can add even additional force on them. MtDoraDave shows a possible option with grommeted tarps that could be used in winter although that technique as seen doesn't totally elevate issues with tarps with grommets.

    With a bivy in the mix and lighter wind/snow coming from one direction(not swirling) a simple lean to config. can work too bushcraft style. Under this config. I like to set up a small warming fire in front of the lean to to reflect heat back to my sleeping area. This set up provides the easiest of entries, freedom of moving around, decent headroom, and ease to cook by or see the fire. With a ton of gear protected space can be an issue. This is about as least uncomplicated as a tarp and bivy combo can get.

  10. #10

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    That pitch looks good. Very good.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

  11. #11
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    Ive never pitched a tarp but I saw this and thought it might work
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=j3k1KEfZyN8

    Look forwards to opinions.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by gracebowen View Post
    Ive never pitched a tarp but I saw this and thought it might work
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=j3k1KEfZyN8

    Look forwards to opinions.
    I don't like using the overhead tarp as floor. For a couple of ounces you can get a groundcloth. With the cheap blue tarp, less of a problem.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by gracebowen View Post
    Ive never pitched a tarp but I saw this and thought it might work
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=j3k1KEfZyN8

    Look forwards to opinions.
    For winter, add in a swirling wind, strong unidirectional wind, snow load, rain, attempting to keep rain out, enclosing oneself in it I can recognize issues. Basically he built a flimsy bag. But hey he's out there playing around with this tarp.

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