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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texaco View Post
    Wow, I was not expecting this kind of response. I've read everything, and will go back through and reply accordingly.

    Thanks all!
    That's excellent. There will be a test afterwards.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by LoneStranger View Post
    There is great wisdom in that statement.

    Have you ever winter hiked with a thermos to keep your water from freezing Wolf? Dang thing weighs over a pound but I fill my stainless with boiled water in the morning and use it to melt the ice in my insulated drinking bottle all day.

    Texaco if you haven't perused this thread from a few months ago there was a lot of good discussion there on the topic of doing the LT in Winter http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/show...nter-thru-hike
    I used thermos-like insulation water-bottle covers. They do helped but you can only carry so much water with them. There is a huge amount of effort constancy breaking snow, route finding, etc. Once you open up that lid, you boiling water is going to quickly loose a lot of heat fast. You can add mix snow in with the water and get a little bit more but it wasn't worth it. The snow would cool down the water I did have. It is a trade off. If you carry much water, it is going to weigh you down more and make it harder to break snow. For myself, I found the best course of action was to simple to melt snow by mid-day.

    V/R

    Wolf

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    [QUOTE=Wolf - 23000;2107144If you carry much water, it is going to weigh you down more and make it harder to break snow. For myself, I found the best course of action was to simple to melt snow by mid-day Wolf[/QUOTE]

    It can beneficial to carry an ice axe, if for no other reason then to break through the ice in a stream to get to the water.
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  4. #24
    Registered User Wolf - 23000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    It can beneficial to carry an ice axe, if for no other reason then to break through the ice in a stream to get to the water.
    Others may had their own experience but there was only one stream that I saw flowing. Everything else was FROZEN solid or under several feet of snow where it could not be seen. No springs, even the lakes were frozen to a point I was able to hike on top.

    An ice axe could help chip out ice but normally it was just easier to just grab some snow and compact it down in the cooking pot.

    Wolf

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    the article was in the GMC's quarterly "Long Trail News" magazine, as I recall I saw the story in a copy that was left in a laundromat in Pearisburg, VA back in April 2013...while I was on an AT section hike. It's been a while, but I think the LT winter hike in that story was done the previous winter 2012-13.

    GMC HQ may still have it on file.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Praha4 View Post
    the article was in the GMC's quarterly "Long Trail News" magazine, as I recall I saw the story in a copy that was left in a laundromat in Pearisburg, VA back in April 2013...while I was on an AT section hike. It's been a while, but I think the LT winter hike in that story was done the previous winter 2012-13.

    GMC HQ may still have it on file.
    There has been several people prior to 2012-13 who have winter hike the Long Trail.

    Wolf

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    https://www.40below.com/products_det...p?ProductID=19

    these bottles plus the same companies insulated bottle covers work great.

    I would probably bring along 2x 1.5L's in the bottle covers and keep another 1L in my pack wrapped in a sock or something

    but.. I have no intentions of thru hiking the LT in winter

  8. #28
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    1.5 liters are pretty big bottles. They dont fit in my pack's pockets.

  9. #29

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    Winter is the one time you do want to carry the heavy, wide mouth quart Nalgene bottles. And get insulated sleeves to cover them. I have two, one is thin and just insulates the body of the bottle for when it's not too cold and one made with 1/4 closed cell foam insulation that includes a cover to totally insulate the bottle for when it's really cold.
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    Alright guys, here we go...


    Quote Originally Posted by Kerosene View Post
    That will certainly be an adventure, Texaco. Frankly, some northern sections might be easier in deep snow (assuming you have the right snowshoes or crampons) than they are when the rock is slick and wet.

    I'm assuming that you and your friend have done a fair amount of winter backpacking in deeper snow and are adept at keeping yourself from the sweat/freeze cycle...something that I've always found difficult to achieve. If you haven't, then get out there for a few weekend hikes beforehand to tune your gear and walking style; it is a lot different from that sub-20 pound pack you probably hiked with for most of your AT thru-hike! You'll probably have more bailout options if you start at the VT/MA border, which will allow you to get used to deeper snow and hairier weather as you head north, plus figure out just how much food you'll need between resupply points.

    Best of luck!
    I've done a fair bit of winter hiking in the Whites, my dad's an in-winter NH48íer, but I do plan on a few more nights up in the Franconia/Crawford region this weekend and next week testing this specific pack set-up out. Waiting for my new snowshoes to get in from Backcountry. Despite my speedy thru, my A.T. pack weight was actually around 30lbs with camera and electronic gear which allowed me to blog so thoroughly. I think this pack weight will come in around 5 lbs more than that. Total weight is a guess at this point, though.

    We are planning to begin in Adams and head north, much for the same idea as you posted, weíll get further up as the weather conditions worsen. Also, having already done the first hundred or so miles while white-blazing to Maine, weíre familiar with that region which might allow us quicker miles in the beginning to save up for slower days further north.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wolf - 23000 View Post
    Winter thru-hiking the Long Trail is a SERIOUS BUTT KICKER!
    Second, plan on stopping around noon to melt snow for water. You may not notice it at first but you have to keep your energy up.

    Third, the long trail is a green tunnel. That is also going to play against you while the snow from the trees falls down on top of you.

    Carry extra fuel.

    It also pays to have a wooden or plastic spoon instead of a metal spoon.

    Stay safe and have fun!
    All great advice, Wolf. Thanks for commenting.

    The details about water are definitely helpful, as thatís something Iíve spent quite a bit of time thinking about. I knew early on that my 3-season Sawyer Squeeze wasnít going to cut it with the regular/full time sub-freezing temperatures. The benefit of the two of us hiking is that we will be splitting weight of the tent, each carrying 8oz fuel canisters, and 2 separate stoves. There will be a redundancy of critical gear.

    My plan for upper body gear day to day hiking is a long poly underwear layer, a mid weight fleece quarter zip midlayer, and my Marmot PreCip jacket with the hood (re: snow falling from above) with a microfleece hat that covers my ears. I also have a fleece facemask/balaclava type to protect against frostbite on my cheeks. Iím strongly considering ski goggles as well for both depth perception and eye protection. Thoughts on the goggles?

    Iíve got a strong plastic spoon I plan to bring.

    Quote Originally Posted by LoneStranger View Post
    Texaco if you haven't perused this thread from a few months ago there was a lot of good discussion there on the topic of doing the LT in Winter http://www.whiteblaze.net/forum/show...nter-thru-hike
    Thanks Stranger! Iíve looked through it, and plan to again a few more times.

    [QUOTE=colorado_rob;2106975]

    First, I'm jealous! My wife and I were talking about trying this feat this year.

    Of course this will be a total but-kicker and frigid cold a lot, but of course, that's part of the appeal!

    Ömeaning maybe this concern is slightly overstated.

    Timing of the hike: To get this thing done reasonably, I like the idea of the late December start; bigger chance of non-epic snow levels that early.

    Excellent chance you could care less, and that's 100% fine. I'm just saying "for the record" that if you start in actual calendar winter (the 21st) and pull this off, you will have done something no one has done.
    QUOTE]

    Rob,

    Thanks for chiming in. Itís great to hear that you and your wife were talking about the same thing. I know you said you hiked E2E in the fall, hopefully I can help provide some info for you for your hike next winter. Iíll be interested to see how the green tunnel syndrome is. Itís been interesting enough to follow weather patterns thus far, see photos of the Whites from friends (headed up there this weekend, so that will be interesting to get a first hand eye on).

    Regarding timing, you bring up a fascinating point that I had not considered. Iím a records kind of guy, and I thrive on challenges. My A.T. experience left me with a 62 mile ďdayĒ (20.5 hours) out of Harperís Ferry as a self challenge, and I typically would hike 30 or more miles each Sunday as a self-imposed ďSunday ChallengeĒ just to keep things interesting. I know thereís some debate on here as to whether or not itís on record of having been done before. I plan to call the GMC tomorrow and ask them the details. If it has been done before, Iíll start as planned on 19. Thereís a deadline for me to finish (I have to be in Orlando the 15th of January) so 48 hours could make or break the hike. Need to be smart in that regard. If it technically has not been done beforeÖ wellÖ 12/21 it is.

    Looking forward to staying in touch. Hopefully the blog provides some entertainment and insight for you. Thanks again!

    [QUOTE=Deadeye;2106979] I also have only one suggestion about gear: bring a CCF pad in addition to your inflatable. QUOTE]

    My winter backpack is a Cold Cold World Chaos pack. The padding/back support is removable as an extra layer of foam under an inflatable pad. I think thatíll do if necessary as some extra insulation or as an emergency backup if need be! Thanks for your suggestion, definitely a valid point.

    Quote Originally Posted by rafe View Post
    Texaco, have you hiked all of the LT yet?

    Just be aware that there are some... interesting sections, north of Killington. Stuff that makes most of the AT look like child's play. Stuff that I'd be wary of doing in deep snow or with any amount of ice. Aside from the steepness and footing issues -- I'd be concerned with navigation, ie., just staying on the trail. Challenging enough in summer, in some places. So much green tunnel.

    On the plus side, as others have mentioned, you'll have less mud to deal with.
    Rafe Ė I havenít hiked the northern part after the A.T. heads to the whites. I appreciate the heads up, and will definitely be exercising caution in the unknown territory. I think that hiking as a team will allow us an edge with staying mentally sharp and supported during those tougher sections or worse weather.

    I have the weatherproof maps, Guthookís Long Trail app on my phone (hugely helpful on the A.T. with regard to finding shelters, knowing exact location), and will have a separate GPS app that I use while on Overland expeditions in my Jeep that will show my exact GPS location in relation to the trail. Yes, I know about electronics and battery in cold and all that. I carry spare battery banks for my electronics in order to maintain the blog while off the grid, so Iím not as concerned about losing power. Weíll be keen to keep an eye on where we are.

    Thanks for the thoughts. Vermud be damned.

    Quote Originally Posted by Deadeye View Post
    For me, one of the biggest challenges to LT winter hiking is the deep snow. Not expecting 3 feet of snow in December? Woodford, VT, southern LT, got 26 inches the day before Thanksgiving this year! In these conditions, just finding the trail can be very time-consuming. It's just plain exhausting.

    On the plus side, much of the trail will be well-packed, especially around higher peaks, places with views, or gentler terrain where xc skiers go. Many of the most difficult places, such as the forehead and chin on Mansfield, have bad-weather bypasses that avoid the steepest pitches. No mud is (almost) guaranteed. No bugs. Usually no bears, but the mice will still be hanging around the shelters. Absolute quiet, plenty of solitude. Some of the clearest skies and cleanest air you can get in the US.

    I hope you have a blast.
    As I said above, itís been interesting to watch the weather thus far this year, and Iíll definitely be continuing to keep an eye on it as we get closer to my departure date. Iím hoping that my GPS backups to printed maps will lend a hand at finding the trail when/if need be.

    Your second paragraph made me smile. I too look forward to clear winter skies (weíll be hiking between full moons, so it should be startlingly dark on most nightsÖ Iím an astrophotographer so I live for that kind of thing) but the solitude on the trail will be amazing. Thanks for the well wishes, hope you follow along on the blog.



    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    The snow is already starting to pile up in the Greens (and here in the Whites). Looks like it might be a real winter this season. Be sure to get snowshoes with heal lifters, it will make going up the steep climbs a lot easier. But there might not be enough snow in 3 weeks to make snowshoes usable, but enough to make it really difficult to hike through.

    Cell service in Vermont is real sketchy, but should be okay around the ski areas. Speaking of ski areas, there are quite a few ski trials you will either have to go up, go down or cross which can be a real challenge trying to avoid being run over by skiers.
    Iíve got shoes with heel lifters, Tubbs Flex Alps. Iíll be interested to see just how much snow we run into.

    I had AT&T on the A.T. 2(almost 3!) years ago and had consistent 4G/LTE service up in the mountains. Hoping itís stayed the same or perhaps gotten a little better. My pack is bright red, and Marmot shell is bright red. Hoping I stick out like a sore thumb on a white washed ski slope

    Quote Originally Posted by colorado_rob View Post
    One other very GOOD thing about all the ski areas is that they will be running, and therefore you can grab a free lift ride down into towns/resorts, warm up, fuel up, then ride back up and continue.
    Totally valid points!

    Quote Originally Posted by Wolf - 23000 View Post
    There has been several people prior to 2012-13 who have winter hike the Long Trail.

    Wolf
    If you have any links, Iíd love to see them. Having a hard time finding any on my own aside the couple from 2012/13 who finished on the Catamount Trail instead of the L.T. due to it being ďbasically impassableĒ (their words via a Facebook post). My plan is to call the GMC tomorrow and find out what they have on record.

    Quote Originally Posted by fastfoxengineering View Post
    I would probably bring along 2x 1.5L's in the bottle covers and keep another 1L in my pack wrapped in a sock or something

    but.. I have no intentions of thru hiking the LT in winter
    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    Winter is the one time you do want to carry the heavy, wide mouth quart Nalgene bottles. And get insulated sleeves to cover them. I have two, one is thin and just insulates the body of the bottle for when it's not too cold and one made with 1/4 closed cell foam insulation that includes a cover to totally insulate the bottle for when it's really cold.
    Regarding both of your posts, I have 2x the ultra-light Nalgene bottles, wide mouth with the fancy plastic inserts. Also have neoprene insulation covers for them. Minimal weight that add a little bit more insulation to the things.
    --
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    Long Trail Winter 2016 | December 19th - ......
    Endurance Adventuring / A.T. Resource Blog - www.2180miles.com

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    Okay so! That's pretty much all the big ticket thoughts/comments from you guys. I really appreciate everyone reaching out and talking to me about their experiences and suggestions. Definitely have been helpful and have pushed me to consider different aspects of my hike. This is a great community, and it's nice to be off the typical "next year's A.T. class" threads with everyone and their mother chiming in with silly information.

    I'm going to REI tomorrow for some small things. Once I get my new compression sack (compressing a -15 synth. bag is a lot different from a 20* down bag) then I can get you guys some more stats on bag weight and actual packed gear. Definitely will be interested in all your thoughts on what's on my back.

    Thanks guys for taking the time to chime in. Be sure to check out the blog, 2180miles.com, and register for the email updates if you want. I won't spam you with stupid stuff, but there will hopefully be regular posts about the hike itself, along with a few more pre-hike posts regarding gear and prep.

    Look forward to hearing back from you all.

    Tex
    --
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    Long Trail Winter 2016 | December 19th - ......
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    Texaco, don't forget the corn cob pipe, coal for two eyes, button for nose, top hat and broomstick.

    Happy Birthday.

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texaco View Post
    All great advice, Wolf. Thanks for commenting.

    The details about water are definitely helpful, as thatís something Iíve spent quite a bit of time thinking about. I knew early on that my 3-season Sawyer Squeeze wasnít going to cut it with the regular/full time sub-freezing temperatures. The benefit of the two of us hiking is that we will be splitting weight of the tent, each carrying 8oz fuel canisters, and 2 separate stoves. There will be a redundancy of critical gear.

    My plan for upper body gear day to day hiking is a long poly underwear layer, a mid weight fleece quarter zip midlayer, and my Marmot PreCip jacket with the hood (re: snow falling from above) with a microfleece hat that covers my ears. I also have a fleece facemask/balaclava type to protect against frostbite on my cheeks. Iím strongly considering ski goggles as well for both depth perception and eye protection. Thoughts on the goggles?

    Iíve got a strong plastic spoon I plan to bring.

    I have the weatherproof maps, Guthookís Long Trail app on my phone (hugely helpful on the A.T. with regard to finding shelters, knowing exact location), and will have a separate GPS app that I use while on Overland expeditions in my Jeep that will show my exact GPS location in relation to the trail. Yes, I know about electronics and battery in cold and all that. I carry spare battery banks for my electronics in order to maintain the blog while off the grid, so Iím not as concerned about losing power. Weíll be keen to keep an eye on where we are.

    If you have any links, Iíd love to see them. Having a hard time finding any on my own aside the couple from 2012/13 who finished on the Catamount Trail instead of the L.T. due to it being ďbasically impassableĒ (their words via a Facebook post). My plan is to call the GMC tomorrow and find out what they have on record.
    Texaco,
    Just a couple points. Winter hiking the Long Trail is a SERIOUS hike that can very quickly turn out BAD. Iím going to be brutally honest because this hike can end lives. First your cell phone app WILL NOT WORK. When I took my cell phone winter hiking in Maine (2005) full charge. While gearing up from my car, in less than 20 minutes I found my cell phone completely DEAD. Cell phone batteries are not designed to handle that kind of extreme COLD. Your extra batteries will be dead before you are even able to use it. The batteries I did find that can handle the EXTREME cold are the lithium batteries made by Energizer. I used a GPS that took AA batteries and map/compass to help keep me on course.
    You are also going to need more fuel. I recommend using white gas, with the ability to simmer. Canisters have come a long way but they still are not burning as hot as white gas. Your stove and amount of fuel needed is going to be drain in two ways. First by the outside temperatures is going to require more fuel to burn than your summer hike. Two the ice/snow is much colder than the water you can get from youíre AT thru-hike also requiring more fuel. For your meals, figure on at least 30 minutes per/burn to include both cooking your food and melting snow/ice.
    Your Marmot jacket is going to quickly become an ice jacket. When the snow falls on top of it, your jacket is going to quickly freeze while you are wearing it. The best thing that I found that helped was wearing a poncho. A simple non-rip nylon poncho did wonders. It was also usefully in helping keep me warm while breaking for lunch.
    Finally, when I did my 1995 winter Long Trail thru-hike, it was before the Internet was even popular. Iím not aware of any link of other winter LT hikers. It is difficult to post anything from the trail because of the cold and the service.

    Hope this helps.

    Wolf

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    I've only done 10 straight days on the LT in the summer and it was more challenging than I assumed with constant PUDs and very slippery conditions.

    Good Luck. If you are from NH then you hike 4Ks in the winter like I do and thus have an idea of what you are getting into.

    Except the trails in NH are usually broken out. On LT it will often not be the case.

    All the advice was spot on except perhaps the comparison to conditions that caused Matrosova's death on Mt.Washington. Matrosove got picked up by the wind like a kite and got injured by the fall. I don't believe you'll encounter that and if for the few places that will be exposed and windy there will be quicker ways to retreat back into the tree line.
    Let me go

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    I'm still jealous you have the time to do this though

    I've done a few winter trips to Baxter State Park. When the snow is deep and unconsolidated on the trails or munor bushwhacks it gets downright miserable. it's like swimming in the plastic balls at Chucky Cheese's
    Let me go

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    Texaco, don't forget the corn cob pipe, coal for two eyes, button for nose, top hat and broomstick.

    Happy Birthday.
    Thanks Dogwood! I'm traveling with work the week before I leave, come home for 48 hours (my birthday the latter 24) then leave for this! I may not be carrying the pipe and coal, but I am hiking with a guy whose trail name is Santa so that will have to do over the Christmas holiday


    Quote Originally Posted by T.S.Kobzol View Post
    I've only done 10 straight days on the LT in the summer and it was more challenging than I assumed with constant PUDs and very slippery conditions.

    Good Luck. If you are from NH then you hike 4Ks in the winter like I do and thus have an idea of what you are getting into.

    Except the trails in NH are usually broken out. On LT it will often not be the case.

    All the advice was spot on except perhaps the comparison to conditions that caused Matrosova's death on Mt.Washington. Matrosove got picked up by the wind like a kite and got injured by the fall. I don't believe you'll encounter that and if for the few places that will be exposed and windy there will be quicker ways to retreat back into the tree line.
    Quote Originally Posted by Wolf - 23000 View Post
    Texaco,
    Just a couple points. Winter hiking the Long Trail is a SERIOUS hike that can very quickly turn out BAD.

    The batteries I did find that can handle the EXTREME cold are the lithium batteries made by Energizer. I used a GPS that took AA batteries and map/compass to help keep me on course.

    You are also going to need more fuel.

    Your Marmot jacket is going to quickly become an ice jacket. When the snow falls on top of it, your jacket is going to quickly freeze while you are wearing it.

    It is difficult to post anything from the trail because of the cold and the service.

    Hope this helps.

    Wolf
    Thanks for the quick reply Wolf. Please don't think I'm naive to winter in the mountains. First priority is safety.

    I've been a big fan of the Max Lithium 8x AAAs since forever. I use them in my SPOT tracker, headlamp, etc. They'll also be used in our 2-way walkie talkies and should be great due to their -40* rating. Appreciate the input there! I hike with my iPhone in my 1/4 zip's chest pocket, so it stays close to my body heat at all times to maintain some consistency with battery life, then sleep with it in my sleeping bag at night to keep it warm with me. I'm very aware of the depletion effect cold weather has on batteries, and am fairly experienced with working around those issues.

    When I said we'd each carry an 8oz canister, I hope you didn't think I meant 2 canisters to last the entire hike... we'll plan to get off and resupply our food and fuel as necessary, and before either run fully out as I sometimes did on the A.T. - this hike isn't being taken lightly, and neither of us are inexperienced hikers. I do appreciate your concern and suggestions.

    Regarding the Marmot, I had it in sub freezing, hailing, snowing, every-kind-of-winter-precipitation-ever weather while in the Smokies and further south in Georgia/TN at the beginning of my hike. It performed without issue, and I never ran across the issues you're describing. I've also worn it repeatedly on winter hikes in the Whites (summiting Moosilauke at 5*, howling winds and snow, etc) without issue. I'll remember your wisdom, and if necessary will pick up a poncho if the need arrises.

    I had no issues with service last time, and am aware that it may not be as consistent further north. All of the maps I carry on my devices are fully self contained and saved offline, so they do not require cell service to view/explore. If I can't blog daily, the worst thing that happens is that people back home get anxious to read about what's going on... worse things could happen, and it drives viewership through the roof... not a terrible thing

    Thanks again for your input, hugely helpful.

    Quote Originally Posted by T.S.Kobzol View Post
    I'm still jealous you have the time to do this though
    Thanks for chiming in T.S.!

    I'm self employed and have hugely supportive clients who love reading about my adventures and seeing the photos. Taking off months for the A.T. came at no expense, and I'm often pushed by clients to know when I'm going next and where I'll be adventuring. I'm lucky in that regard.

    Looking forward to the ball pits of snow. Hopefully less kiddo germs.
    --
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    Texaco,
    Followed your AT blog. One of the best I can remember. I still go back and read sections of it and reference it here on WB.

    I lived in Burlington for a few years and remember -30 without wind chill in the city, a good 20 degrees cooler in them mountains. Not in December though)
    I cannot image being in that type of weather for an extended period of time. You and Santa have some major cojones for sure.
    Snow could be DEEP. The first year I was there it started snowing Dec. 1 and continued for 25 straight days. Shoveled my drive twice a day.
    After three years I had enough and moved back home.

    Consider a Whisperlite instead of a canister stove. Carry a canister stove for backup. Also rig it with a copper strip as it will work much better in the extreme chill.

    Good luck, cannot wait to read about your trip.

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    Honestly, the thing I would be most worried about (other than temp and water) is the terrain. There are a lot of sections after the AT branches off where there are ladders/ropes to continue over a gap or whatnot and even more sections where I'd spend 10 minutes just figuring out how to continue down a 20 foot drop over boulders. Never snowshoed before, but I would not trust that the snow beneath me would not have air pockets in it. Also, I can't see how there will be a way to get over Mansfield. I recall a rock shelf that I had to get on all fours and I barely had enough room and that was after a rock wall climb. But, if you've done similar before, give it a shot. Maybe plan a number of bail out options.

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    Quote Originally Posted by swisscross View Post
    Texaco,
    Followed your AT blog. One of the best I can remember. I still go back and read sections of it and reference it here on WB.

    I lived in Burlington for a few years and remember -30 without wind chill in the city, a good 20 degrees cooler in them mountains. Not in December though)
    I cannot image being in that type of weather for an extended period of time.

    Good luck, cannot wait to read about your trip.
    Swiss-

    Thanks for the kind words. It means the world to hear/know that people still have high regard for the blog and use it as a reference point for other hikes/A.T. information. I added a poll to some of the Appalachian Trail related pages on the site and there are a lot of people that use it for research for upcoming thru-hikes. The internet is an amazing place.

    It will certainly be interesting to have exposure to those kinds of temperatures for any kind of time period, you're right.

    Look forward to having you follow along with the blog again. Be sure to leave comments if you want, they're a huge moral boost while I'm out on the trail itself.
    --
    Texaco
    GA-ME 2014 | April 4th - July 26th
    Long Trail Winter 2016 | December 19th - ......
    Endurance Adventuring / A.T. Resource Blog - www.2180miles.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by Collin View Post
    Honestly, the thing I would be most worried about (other than temp and water) is the terrain. Maybe plan a number of bail out options.
    A 100% valid thought, and it is something that Santa (my hiking partner) and I have discussed. We'll have bailouts noted in case it comes down to getting out of there early, or will be ready to spend a day in the tent if there's a severe reason to. The goal here is not stupidity and hope for success, it's safety and hope for success.
    --
    Texaco
    GA-ME 2014 | April 4th - July 26th
    Long Trail Winter 2016 | December 19th - ......
    Endurance Adventuring / A.T. Resource Blog - www.2180miles.com

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