Page 1 of 5 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 96

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1

    Default Tent in shelter?

    I was day-hiking in the rollercoaster section of the AT today and ran into a few SOBO hikers and I chatted with most of them for a few minutes. They both mentioned using their tents in the shelters when there isn't a tent spot at the shelter. They said that lately the mouse situation has become so overwhelming that they won't sleep in the shelter without the tent.

    Heading SOBO and being behind most thru hikers they are getting most shelters to themselves.

    Is this a normal practice? I'm assuming that when you have shelter mates this is terrible etiquette...?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    05-05-2011
    Location
    state of confusion
    Posts
    9,869
    Journal Entries
    1

    Default

    Terrible etiquette, yes.
    Common, yes if theres room. Ive come across it many times.
    Youre not likely to see it in the bubble, but at slower times, plenty.
    But its also first come-first served at shelters, and theres no law against it on AT.

    Cant say it really bothers me, unless it was raining and people wanted in and they were taking up too much space.
    But...a twin tent 56" wide with two people...really nothing to say about it is there? Most people will claim a 3' wide strip of tyvek for their own turf, so unless they claim more per person, it really doesnt pass the so frickin what test in my book.


    I recall at least half dozen tents set up in the overmountain barn one night, downstairs and up, with plenty o room for all.
    Last edited by MuddyWaters; 09-04-2016 at 21:35.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MuddyWaters View Post
    Terrible etiquette, yes.
    Common, yes if theres room. Ive come across it many times.
    Youre not likely to see it in the bubble, but at slower times, plenty.
    But its also first come-first served at shelters, and theres no law against it on AT.

    Cant say it really bothers me, unless it was raining and people wanted in and they were taking up too much space.
    But...a twin tent 56" wide with two people...really nothing to say about it is there? Most people will claim a 3' wide strip of tyvek for their own turf, so unless they claim more per person, it really doesnt pass the so frickin what test in my book.


    I recall at least half dozen tents set up in the overmountain barn one night, downstairs and up, with plenty o room for all.
    the way the wind and the rain blow through Overmountain we should have set our tent up.

  4. #4
    Registered User Grunt's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-18-2006
    Location
    Swansboro, NC
    Age
    67
    Posts
    100

    Default

    Normal? NO... does it happen YES, but rarely in my experience. If no one is denied space... OK... I've only had it happen once in 10+ years humpin the AT and it was a family with kids. The weather was questionable and I explained that there were more hikers on the way... they very nicely moved their tent outside. I've heard horror stories about shelter conflicts but I think the proper etiquette is simply to use common sense and don't be a shelter hog and deny other hikers proper space. just saying

  5. #5
    Registered User egilbe's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-18-2014
    Location
    Lewiston and Biddeford, Maine
    Age
    57
    Posts
    2,635

    Default

    There is a hiker that was headed Sobo named Mousetrap. He took care of the rodent problem in some of the shelters. We didn't have problems with mice in the shelters he had visited, but the ones he didn't stop in and we did, holy hell, were the mice aggressive and the squirrels vicious. Damn rats!

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-01-2016
    Location
    West Cheste, ohio
    Age
    51
    Posts
    2

    Default How?

    Funny. Did he have a cat?

  7. #7

    Default

    How common is it to arrive at a shelter and have nowhere to tent? How common is it to know in advance that will likely be the case?

  8. #8
    Registered User -Rush-'s Avatar
    Join Date
    05-10-2016
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    500
    Journal Entries
    3
    Images
    1

    Default

    There are plenty of shelters with bad tent areas. The best way to have advanced notice of this is to do serious research into each location. Have fun, you'll be cross-referencing multiple sources. The upshot is that you don't have to stay at the shelter. You can drop in, check it out, get your water, and move on.
    "Though I have lost the intimacy with the seasons since my hike, I retain the sense of perfect order, of graceful succession and surrender, and of the bold brilliance of fall leaves as they yield to death." - David Brill

  9. #9
    Hiker bigcranky's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-22-2002
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Age
    57
    Posts
    7,888
    Images
    296

    Default

    The thru-hiker guidebooks usually let you know if there are tent sites at any particular shelter. For the Companion, to which we contribute, if it says "camping" then there are tent sites. If it doesn't say anything, then there probably aren't. Places that don't allow tenting are also marked (e.g., the Partnership Shelter). This is not a foolproof method, nor does it guarantee that you'll get a site, of course.
    Ken B
    'Big Cranky'
    Our Long Trail journal

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by -Rush- View Post
    There are plenty of shelters with bad tent areas. The best way to have advanced notice of this is to do serious research into each location. Have fun, you'll be cross-referencing multiple sources. The upshot is that you don't have to stay at the shelter. You can drop in, check it out, get your water, and move on.
    Shelters with bad tent areas? It's laughable. Just go a half mile back or a half mile further on the trail and set up your tent. No purpose or sense WHATSOEVER in camping in or near any AT rat-box shelter.

    Putting a tent inside a shelter is the final symptom of shelter-induced entitlement retardation.(SIER). Here's a thought: Backpack the AT and just pretend, just imagine, there's not a single shelter on the trail for your so-called mouse-chewing, rodent-pooping convenience. Man-up or girl-up and avoid the shelter system as you would avoid a hepatitis-laced potato.

  11. #11
    Registered User mountainman's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-23-2010
    Location
    statesville, nc
    Age
    73
    Posts
    160
    Images
    2

    Default

    Tipi Walter, Well said

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    Shelters with bad tent areas? It's laughable. Just go a half mile back or a half mile further on the trail and set up your tent. No purpose or sense WHATSOEVER in camping in or near any AT rat-box shelter.

    Putting a tent inside a shelter is the final symptom of shelter-induced entitlement retardation.(SIER). Here's a thought: Backpack the AT and just pretend, just imagine, there's not a single shelter on the trail for your so-called mouse-chewing, rodent-pooping convenience. Man-up or girl-up and avoid the shelter system as you would avoid a hepatitis-laced potato.
    A distance away from the shelter is a good idea, where its allowable. Some areas don't allow camping outside of the shelter areas, states like MA and CT don't allow camping outside of designated camping areas (some have shelters, some don't). Its up to the hiker to know the rules of the trail where they are and where camping (and fires) are allowed.

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Traveler View Post
    A distance away from the shelter is a good idea, where its allowable. Some areas don't allow camping outside of the shelter areas, states like MA and CT don't allow camping outside of designated camping areas (some have shelters, some don't). Its up to the hiker to know the rules of the trail where they are and where camping (and fires) are allowed.
    But vast areas allow dispersed camping like Georgia, all of NC and TN save for the Smokies, and nearly all of Virginia.

  14. #14

    Default

    [QUOTE=Tipi Walter;avoid a hepatitis-laced potato.[/QUOTE]

    Hmmm? I never knew potatoes could be laced with hepatitis.

  15. #15
    Registered User Grampie's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-25-2002
    Location
    Meriden, CT
    Posts
    1,356
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    2

    Default

    As far as I'm concerned It's bad etiquette to set up your tent in a shelter. You may arrive at a shelter that is empty but you don't know who else will arrive later looking to use the shelter. I have thru-hiked and have not remembered a shelter area that didn't have tent sights.
    If you plan to stay in a shelter you have to get use to mice. They have found a shelter to be a convenient home, so share it with them.
    Grampie-N->2001

  16. #16
    AT 2012
    Join Date
    09-11-2006
    Location
    Wallingford, CT
    Age
    68
    Posts
    1,727

    Default

    and the related question is... set up a hammock in a shelter? It is very tempting to do so when there's rain or snow, or if it is just windy out. and if the shelter is empty, no harm done. pretty much same guidelines apply -- if you do set up in a shelter and hikers arrive, don't even ask -- if anyone shows up, just take your hammock down and move out of the shelter. immediately! In some ways, hammocks are even worse than tents, since the easiest way to hang a hammock is all the way from one side to the other.
    Lazarus

  17. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    04-02-2013
    Location
    Pensacola, Florida
    Posts
    599

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 1azarus View Post
    and the related question is... set up a hammock in a shelter? It is very tempting to do so when there's rain or snow, or if it is just windy out. and if the shelter is empty, no harm done. pretty much same guidelines apply -- if you do set up in a shelter and hikers arrive, don't even ask -- if anyone shows up, just take your hammock down and move out of the shelter. immediately! In some ways, hammocks are even worse than tents, since the easiest way to hang a hammock is all the way from one side to the other.
    Also be careful about the sturdiness of the shelter. A hammock puts a lot of strain on supports. Not a problem with trees, but can be with shelters.
    Time is but the stream I go afishin' in.
    Thoreau

  18. #18
    GSMNP 900 Miler
    Join Date
    02-25-2007
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Age
    52
    Posts
    4,241
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 1azarus View Post
    and the related question is... set up a hammock in a shelter? It is very tempting to do so when there's rain or snow, or if it is just windy out. and if the shelter is empty, no harm done. pretty much same guidelines apply -- if you do set up in a shelter and hikers arrive, don't even ask -- if anyone shows up, just take your hammock down and move out of the shelter. immediately! In some ways, hammocks are even worse than tents, since the easiest way to hang a hammock is all the way from one side to the other.
    Setting up a hammock in a shelter? Better check the rules on that one.
    Don't know about the vast majority of the AT, but in the Smokies, the rules explicitly prohibit attaching a hammock to any shelter or other build in GSMNP.

  19. #19
    Registered User egilbe's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-18-2014
    Location
    Lewiston and Biddeford, Maine
    Age
    57
    Posts
    2,635

    Default

    The only reason to tent in or near shelters is because its a convenient water source and usually has a privy. Other than that, camp just off the trail. No one really cares as long as you don't leave your charmin blooms about to be stepped in. I'll usually set up my bugnet in a shelter. It acts as a pretty good mouse bivy, unless they mice really want to sleep with me, then they just chew a hole in the netting.

  20. #20

    Default

    Set up a tent in a shelter when alone in a severe storm, sure. Otherwise, set it up somewhere else.

Page 1 of 5 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •