Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 61

Thread: Trekking Poles

  1. #41
    Registered User Huli's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-02-2013
    Location
    Virginia
    Age
    44
    Posts
    180

    Default

    Coming in late with my opinion. I skimmed a bit on what everyone said. I don't ski with poles; I did try and they got in my way. I don't hike with poles; I did try a few times and they ended up lashed to my pack. My UL tarp needs poles, so last week I bought parts and made carbon tent poles for my tarp ($35).

  2. #42
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    18,011

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DuneElliot View Post
    Gory picture alert:


    Attachment 35908
    Is that a bioelectric mini USB port in your lip to self charge electronics?

  3. #43
    Registered User jjozgrunt's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-22-2014
    Location
    Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
    Age
    62
    Posts
    489

    Default

    Ok here we go.

    Uphill - Some studies suggest as much as 20% relief for leg muscles if used correctly.
    Downhill - Help with stability and taking pressure off the knees. As a side issue here most knee problems occur because people are walking down hill and hit with knee locked, ie straight leg. Try walking down with the knees slightly bent and you will find that the quads take a lot of the shock of impact off the knees. The first time I tried this was on a steep 800m (2600') descent and my quads were screaming by the bottom but no sore knees. Takes some getting used to but works. ( You look like a troglodyte though).
    Flats - Can help maintain momentum.
    Creek crossings etc - aid with stability
    Tents - use as part of the tent system (mine a Duplex)

    Remember to take your hands out of the straps anytime there is a chance you will fall. (ok for some of us that could be every step)

    You have to use them properly and straps are an integral part of the pole. Going uphill the web of the hand presses into the strap and provides the leverage while the fingers only lightly hold the handles. Taking straps off means you must grip the handles all day and that can lead to muscle problems in the forearms.

    Here's a reasonable video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?annota...&v=7q2YwOE4okA
    "He was a wise man who invented beer." Plato

  4. #44
    Registered User KDogg's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-30-2015
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Posts
    267

    Default

    Only saw a few folks at the end of my thru hike that weren't using two poles. I haven't hiked without them for many years. They are helpful in so many different ways as have been pointed out in this thread. I put some bulk on my arms from using them too. I've heard said that folks that thru without them lose lots more muscle mass on their upper body.

  5. #45
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-12-2009
    Location
    Spring Lake, MI
    Age
    55
    Posts
    1,466

    Default

    The easiest way to see if you like them is to try a pair... Now, you could go with a plain stick, as I see others recommended. Actually, we used broom stick replacement poles back in the day on our first hikes; however, that will not give you an idea of the basic pole. If you really want to try them, pick up a pair at Walmart for $19.99. Try them out. My Walmart poles lasted me over 400 miles - between my hikes on the NCT and AT. If you decide you like them, then research the better ones! That is what I did! (But I am sick that I left mine in a shuttle vehicle last June. Ah, well, guess I get to upgrade to a pair that can be taken on airplanes for my next trip!)

  6. #46
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-10-2005
    Location
    Bedford, MA
    Posts
    12,678

    Default

    My first 25 years of hiking, no poles. They weren't a thing (yet.) Some folks used walking sticks. In 2000 I bought a pair of Lekis, and after the first mile or two, I felt dumb for having waited so long to try them.

    They don't help all that much on flat, even ground. eg. roads or meadows. They don't help in super-steep terrain or weird places like Mahoosuc Notch or Beaver Brook trail up Moosilauke -- places where you need your hands. But for all the rest (which is about 95% of the AT) they're a great help.

    From my observations of thru hikers, section hikers and weekend warriors in the White Mountains, it seems the vast majority are using hiking poles nowadays.

  7. #47

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tejloro View Post
    I've never been a fan of poles; they seem like extra weight to me, especially now that I'm using an ultralight hiking style. But... I'm planning a section hike on the AT next year and everyone seems to recommend them. Can you tell me the pros and cons of using (and carrying!) poles on the AT? (I plan on hiking from Springer to Fontana Dam next May). Is there a brand to really consider? Is there a brand to avoid? What price range should I be looking at? Should I ever bother?

    Thanks,
    Tejloro
    I highly recommend poles to anyone who asks. Been using them for years and I can highly recommend the Gossamer Gear carbon fiber poles (either fixed length or adjustable ) as well as the Black Diamond Z Poles.

    The BJ's are a bit heavier but cheaper and much easier to store and carry when not in use.

    I have heard before that using poles reduces load impact on knees while hiking by something like 20%. Based on my use, I can believe it.

    https://www.researchgate.net/publica...untain_Walking

    One of many pieces of research supporting this. Though I'm sure you can find research and opinions that poles are worthless.

    Poles are great if you find high quality lightweight poles. I had a hard time switching from adjustable to fixed length poles since adjustable pole sales companies and advocates tend to be quite persuasive. However, after switching I can say that I never feel the need for adjustable poles and I much prefer the weight savings.

    I currently use the Gossamer Gear LT3C

    They have saved me from many stumbles, falls, and missed footing. They're nice for generating momentum with your arms as you walk (a lot like cross country ski poles). Love poles!

    Have fun out there.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

  8. #48
    Clueless Weekender Another Kevin's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-10-2011
    Location
    Niskayuna, New York
    Age
    64
    Posts
    3,876
    Journal Entries
    10

    Default

    My balance is poor (always has been) and my knees are shot, so for me poles are a Godsend.
    I always know where I am. I'm right here.

  9. #49

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cmoulder View Post
    but my understanding perhaps incorrect? is that this is done in the 'handles-down' mode, which I don't like because of handles having been chewed by porcupines.
    Not correct on Zpacks tents, they pitch with the handle up....

  10. #50
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-03-2004
    Location
    Linden. Va.
    Age
    62
    Posts
    149
    Images
    15

    Default

    I have yet to use hiking poles. The only times that they would have come in handy on my thru-hike would be to fend off dogs or fording a few streams in Maine.

  11. #51

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trailmercury View Post
    Not correct on Zpacks tents, they pitch with the handle up....
    With PacerPoles?? That is the question because of the handle configuration.

    I have a Duplex and, of course, pitch it with handles in the ridgeline pockets using poles with "standard" GG grips. Not sure if this would work with PacerPoles.

  12. #52
    Registered User Sandy of PA's Avatar
    Join Date
    11-10-2011
    Location
    Apollo, PA
    Age
    62
    Posts
    664
    Images
    2

    Default

    With my Z-packs tent I have pitched with handles down using a rubber cap on the carbide tip, without the cap handle must go up.

  13. #53
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-01-2016
    Location
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Posts
    938

    Default

    Just a follow up - the value of poles depends also on where you hike. For example: a couple days ago I hiked solo up (and down) the Mt. Mitchell Trail, and it seemed to me that the vast majority of my steps landed either on rocks or roots. Not coincidentally, I lost count of how many times my poles saved me from stumbling to the ground, or further twisting an ankle or knee to the point of serious injury.

  14. #54
    Registered User
    Join Date
    10-05-2015
    Location
    Milton,FL
    Age
    48
    Posts
    40

    Default

    I don't see how anyone can hike without poles. Just seems natural to me.

  15. #55

    Default

    I can honestly say after being out here on the trail for weeks now that you will want some sort of stick at least when hiking. First two days I had nothing and my right knee was killing me. I eventually found a nice stick and have been using that since. I do not use it on flat areas or less steep downhills that aren't rocky. I see many people with trekking poles going slower since they are constantly striking the ground even when they are walking along flat areas like the edge of the road towards town. Do not do this people, you look silly and are just going slower. This is when you carry the poles by your side.

    If you think trekking poles are extra weight then just get one and get the Locus CP3. It's I think the lightest they make and it is much lighter than my stick I am using which I would love to swap out for. You cannot compact down a stick or carry it in a side pocket like you can a trekking pole.

    They do help you out a lot when going downhill or steep climbs. Use it when you need it and carry it when you don't.

    Well worth getting one though. My knee pain is almost gone now.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  16. #56
    Registered User gbolt's Avatar
    Join Date
    04-21-2014
    Location
    Dayton, Ohio
    Age
    60
    Posts
    654

    Default

    I don't know if anyone else can confirm this, put I have used trekking poles, carried trekking poles and hiked miles without poles. When I don't use poles on pavement/flat trails for miles, my hands swell horribly. Even if I sway my arms a little more when stepping; they still increase in size and actually ache a little. Of course, no long term effect when no longer hiking and doing other chores, but it does get annoying.

    However, when hiking with poles, the hands remain normal size. Maybe another plus for using poles.
    "gbolt" on the Trail

    I am Third

    We are here to help one another along life's journey. Keep the Faith!

    YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCik...NPHW7vu3vhRBGA

  17. #57

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by theory View Post
    I can honestly say after being out here on the trail for weeks now that you will want some sort of stick at least when hiking. First two days I had nothing and my right knee was killing me. I eventually found a nice stick and have been using that since. I do not use it on flat areas or less steep downhills that aren't rocky. I see many people with trekking poles going slower since they are constantly striking the ground even when they are walking along flat areas like the edge of the road towards town. Do not do this people, you look silly and are just going slower. This is when you carry the poles by your side.

    If you think trekking poles are extra weight then just get one and get the Locus CP3. It's I think the lightest they make and it is much lighter than my stick I am using which I would love to swap out for. You cannot compact down a stick or carry it in a side pocket like you can a trekking pole.

    They do help you out a lot when going downhill or steep climbs. Use it when you need it and carry it when you don't.

    Well worth getting one though. My knee pain is almost gone now.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    It is great to see that you're out there living the dream and learning, adapting and remaining in good spirits. Mega kudos!

    I am totally with you on the practice of carrying poles/stick/staff on flats and easy downhills. A few years back I did some experiments with this by walking the same 8-mile section many times over a span of several weeks, using no poles, or poles all the time, or intermittent on ups/downs/flats etc and keeping track of times and energy level and joint comfort, etc. I totally revamped the way I use poles, which naturally coincided with my switch to UL.

  18. #58
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-18-2016
    Location
    Richmond Hill, Georgia
    Posts
    124

    Default

    YES poles!

    Leki Vario Micro Carbon.

    OkeefenokeeJoe

  19. #59
    Registered User DownEaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    03-15-2017
    Location
    Silicon Valley
    Age
    64
    Posts
    682

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shelb View Post
    Ah, well, guess I get to upgrade to a pair that can be taken on airplanes for my next trip!
    What are those special poles, pray tell? From the TSA web site here:
    Hiking Poles
    • Carry On Baggage: No
    • Checked Baggage: Yes
    It doesn't look like there are any variances for different types of hiking poles.

  20. #60
    Registered User
    Join Date
    03-01-2017
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Age
    49
    Posts
    166

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DownEaster View Post
    What are those special poles, pray tell? From the TSA web site here:

    It doesn't look like there are any variances for different types of hiking poles.
    Well that sucks. I've actually flown several times with my hiking poles in my carry-on (disassembled into three pieces) and never had a problem. Now I'm going to have to worry about the TSA swiping my hiking poles.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •