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Thread: gear for kids

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by charliethruhike View Post
    I have a 4 year old that has developed excitement around camping, and when backpacking was described his first question was "Can I go with you?"

    Has anyone here run into backpacks and other gear for young kids? Don't need a lot of room as most of his job will be getting from point A to B, but I am curious on what is available. Currently he has a mini mule from camelbak for a backpack, and his sleeping back is decidedly not for backpacking.
    4 yr old?

    Your looking a spongebob or spiderman model most likely. Sesame street used to be popular but I think its out of production now.

    He will carry toys, maybe a favorite stuffed animal, and a snack.

    You, will carry everything else. Possibly even him.

    Make it all about him, he will have a great time.
    Last edited by MuddyWaters; 07-27-2016 at 01:50.

  2. #22
    Registered User Just Bill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarcasm the elf View Post
    I like this idea. I've got an old mil-surplus liner and love it for car camping and the like. My buddy that was in the service says the newer liners are more or less good to use as a 45degree quilt by themselves.
    The Liners use a version of Primaloft, though it's hard to find out exactly which flavor (Silver, Gold, ONE) But I'm fairly sure it is version of 60gsm Gold/ONE based upon performance and listed weights.
    The extensive quilting used indicates this as well.

    This is the same insulation as you would find in a Patagonia Nano-Puff- with the brick style quilting.
    60 gsm -(2 oz per SQYD) requires quilting 3" O.C.
    100 GSM- (3 oz per SQYD) requires quilting 6" O.C.

    These are full sewn through quilted pieces.
    The minimum I use in my stuff is the 100gsm material. With a non-sewn through construction technique- the rating is 45*. Sewn through is about 50*.

    By the numbers- the military poncho liner would be a 55* rating on it's own. Using it with the poncho likely gets you to 50*.
    A service member (fit, youthful (mid 20's), healthy, and male) fits the "expert" model in the EN ratings... meaning they can typically sleep about 10* cooler than the average user.

    So EN rating style-
    Expert- 45*
    Comfort rating- 55*
    Women's rating- 60* (kiddos would fall into this)
    Cold sleeper- 65*

    Double it up and you would basically have pretty decent 40* bag for the average sleeper (comfort rating).

    at roughly 60x80...
    You could cut one in half and make either of the two bags I showed my kiddos in above...
    Cut in half- to 60"x40"

    FOR A QUILT- Add a channel to the "foot end" fold it in half (to 60x20) and sew up the foot end side closed for about 18" and you will have a nice quilt (like the one my son is in)

    For a rectangle style sleeping bag- Fold it in half the other way 40" x 30"- Add a 24" zipper to the side, then sew closed the rest of the side and the bottom closed. (or use a full zip if you want to open it up).

    That would give you two (fairly high quality) 60* kids bag for about $20 bucks each.
    If you got one kiddo- make two quilts and you can then use one in summer and add the extra one for shoulder seasons.

  3. #23
    Registered User -Rush-'s Avatar
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    Also keep in mind.. if you have smaller children that will be getting hand-me-downs, Osprey customer service will support their backpacks forever. If there's ever an issue, even years down the line, they will likely replace it for free. That's a sound investment.

  4. #24
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    My kid started a few years back...i think he was 7 or 8.....
    Three pieces of gear that he still uses at 10 are the North Face Tigger 20* sleeping bag I bought if eBay, cut down zlite pad and the Deuter fox 30 pack. Another awesome WB member (Justdad) actually passed the pack on as his kid had outgrown it. Very happy with all 3 pieces...he only carries his water, cloths, sleeping bag and few odds and ends...weighing well under 10lbs to his 55lbs of body weight. A few action pics from a few years back.....have fun....time flys!!!



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  5. #25

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    That's awesome Salty! Good lookin' kid!

  6. #26
    Registered User Engine's Avatar
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    If you're going out with a 4-year-old, whatever you do keep it fun. If it turns into a misery for him, it will take an act of congress to get him on the trail next time. Low mileage, frequent breaks, fun games in camp, tasty food, etc...

    And has been stated, be prepared to carry his pack as well as your own half way through the day. At age 6 my son would be dragging bottom after 4 miles or so and he would look absolutely spent at the end of 7 miles. But, 10 minutes after we stopped hiking and started setting up camp we would look around and he was off in the woods playing and having the time of his life. Their energy levels are directly related to the "Fun quotient".

    Take lots of photos, you'll miss these times terribly in 25 years!
    “He is richest who is content with the least, for content is the wealth of nature.” –Socrates

  7. #27
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    Make sure that he takes in food and water regularly, and that he is wearing appropriate layers for the conditions. Having led many hikes with young children, including my own, it is clear that most do not have the awareness to keep fueled and hydrated. Much easier to keep them positive when they are, regardless of the leader's level of enthusiasm.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Engine View Post
    If you're going out with a 4-year-old, whatever you do keep it fun. If it turns into a misery for him, it will take an act of congress to get him on the trail next time. Low mileage, frequent breaks, fun games in camp, tasty food, etc...

    And has been stated, be prepared to carry his pack as well as your own half way through the day. At age 6 my son would be dragging bottom after 4 miles or so and he would look absolutely spent at the end of 7 miles. But, 10 minutes after we stopped hiking and started setting up camp we would look around and he was off in the woods playing and having the time of his life. Their energy levels are directly related to the "Fun quotient".

    Take lots of photos, you'll miss these times terribly in 25 years!
    Oh I know the keep it fun mantra. I didn't think of they once and he acts like he's gagging everytime mint comes around. ....

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  9. #29

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    All a 4 year old needs is a batman backpack to carry a couple of snacks and drinks in. The purpose isn't for him to actually carry anything, its so he thinks he's backpacking.

  10. #30
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    I took my then 10 and 9yr olds on a ~6mpd x 3 day loop in GSMNP 2yrs ago. They are on the shorter side. Modified REI flash 22? packs by sewing the shoulder straps down to raise the bottom of the pack up so it wasn't hitting them in the rear. They used the Marmot kids sleeping bags and 3/4 z-rests.

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  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by greentick View Post
    I took my then 10 and 9yr olds on a ~6mpd x 3 day loop in GSMNP 2yrs ago. They are on the shorter side. Modified REI flash 22? packs by sewing the shoulder straps down to raise the bottom of the pack up so it wasn't hitting them in the rear. They used the Marmot kids sleeping bags and 3/4 z-rests.

    Too cute...kids love trekking poles....


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  12. #32
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    Have the necessary supplies and gear

    Extra
    clothing and shoes - your son or daughterreceives wet and extremely dirty

    Warm clothing -
    it could possibly get chilly especially at night/dress yourself in layers

    Insect repellent - consider time-release formulas

    Sunscreen - they’ll be outside
    all round the dayFirst, aid kit - for those little accidents

    Rain gear -
    place themdry and warm

    , activities -
    you ought toplace them busygames and ToysFind out more aboutWant to Play a game title?

    Familiar bedtime items -
    blankets and pillows, stuffed animals, dolls etc

    Flashlight/glow sticks -
    for helping relieve nighttime fears

    Snacks -
    all of this activity is going to make them hungry

    Drinks - avoid dehydration
    because ofactivity and heat level
    Soren can jump the fridge without the need of problems so a tall cat scratching post was obviously a must. I prefer the siscol rope since carpet alone is going to be trashed within just weeks.

  13. #33
    Registered User Wise Old Owl's Avatar
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    4 years old? I am with OCDave Salty Sack and Ferel Bill on this one... I might invite a dad and close kid friend from the neighborhood or two on a small overnighter... Stuff the kids in the tent and pitch mine 50 feet away...Snoring isn't funny... not even to kids. I have seen dads try to tuff it out with the kids... and you can never be sure how it will work out. They really do not need much gear. just a three season bag throw away and you are carrying everything except the water. Don't spend a lot.
    Last edited by Wise Old Owl; 09-12-2016 at 00:09.
    Dogs are excellent judges of character, this fact goes a long way toward explaining why some people don't like being around them.

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