Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 21
  1. #1

    Lightbulb Gear List... help?

    Hello, all! It's Libby

    I was just wondering if anyone could give me a rundown of gear they have used, or are planning to use for their thru hike. There are so many options!

    Here is my tentative list for my pack (not including food or clothes) :
    Zpacks Arc Haul Pack…. $299
    Western Mountaineering Ultralite 20 Sleeping Bag…. $485
    Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XLite Sleeping Pad…. $159.95
    Zpacks Duplex Tent…. $599
    Black Diamond Distance Carbon Z-Pole Trekking Poles…. $159.95
    Coast HL7 Headlamp…. $39
    Geigerrig Water Bladder… $45
    MSR Pocket Rocket stove …. $40
    Lighter
    Fuel Cannisters (Isopro)
    Evernew 1 Ltr Titanium Pasta Pot…. $60
    Sawyer squeeze water purifier... $39.95
    Toiletries



    Any additions, recommendations, or any advice is a appreciated!
    I am mostly concerned about finding a good stove, sleeping bag, and tent.

    Also, are dry bags necessary? I have seen many gear lists that include them but I wasn't sure...

    Thanks,
    Libby
    ·

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    02-18-2016
    Location
    Sudley, VA
    Posts
    715
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    1

    Default

    I love my Sawyer Squeeze. If you encounter any weather below freezing and forget to protect it, however, the hollow tube membrane can become compromised, so always carry Aquimira with you as a backup. I've been experimenting with both tent and hammock camping, and you might look at a hammock instead of a tent. So much more comfortable if you go with a Hennessy Expedition Asym or something comparable...you lay in them slightly diagonal and you're almost flat. I really love my JetBoil Flash, too. Run a comparison between that and the pocket rocket. What is your cooking plan? All I'm doing is boiling water and making freezer bag meals. If you're planning on actually cooking in lightweight pots and skillets, the pocket rocket would serve you better.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by libbsmac View Post
    Hello, all! It's Libby

    I was just wondering if anyone could give me a rundown of gear they have used, or are planning to use for their thru hike. There are so many options!

    Here is my tentative list for my pack (not including food or clothes) :
    Zpacks Arc Haul Pack…. $299
    Western Mountaineering Ultralite 20 Sleeping Bag…. $485
    Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XLite Sleeping Pad…. $159.95
    Zpacks Duplex Tent…. $599
    Black Diamond Distance Carbon Z-Pole Trekking Poles…. $159.95
    Coast HL7 Headlamp…. $39
    Geigerrig Water Bladder… $45
    MSR Pocket Rocket stove …. $40
    Lighter
    Fuel Cannisters (Isopro)
    Evernew 1 Ltr Titanium Pasta Pot…. $60
    Sawyer squeeze water purifier... $39.95
    Toiletries



    Any additions, recommendations, or any advice is a appreciated!
    I am mostly concerned about finding a good stove, sleeping bag, and tent.

    Also, are dry bags necessary? I have seen many gear lists that include them but I wasn't sure...

    Thanks,
    Libby
    ·
    Your list looks amazingly similar to mine for my planned thru-hikes (CT and PCT). I love my Arc Haul and Duplex. I'd highly suggest getting a few of the options (buckles on the sides to fold the top over, the extra mesh pockets, hip-belt pockets and the double top straps). Just bear in mind their long lead time. My Duplex took two months to get to me.

    A couple of things jump out to me. One, check out Enlightened Equipment for quilts or a hoodless sleeping bag for lightweight but more affordable sleeping bag. I have the EE Convert and paid $300 for it. I think the price recently went up, but still $130 cheaper than the WM Ultralight for less weight.

    You might also want to check out Cascade Designs flick-lock (not twist lock) trekking poles for $45 and 16oz/pair. I got them on a recommendation and short and long-term reviews from renowned LD hiker Andrew Skurka:
    http://andrewskurka.com/2015/cascade...-poles-review/

    http://andrewskurka.com/2015/long-te...ck-lock-poles/

    I use a few dry bags for organization (toiletries, FA kit etc) since I already have them, but mostly line my pack with a trash compactor bag for water protection.

  4. #4

    Default

    Thanks for the advice! I've have tried hammock camping before, but never on a long distance hike. My biggest concern is staying dry, and I assume a tarp could be used but I would need to find one that is ultra light. I also planned on just boiling some water and making freezer bag meals. What type of pot do you use to boil your water?

    Thanks,
    Libby

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jgarlits View Post
    I love my Sawyer Squeeze. If you encounter any weather below freezing and forget to protect it, however, the hollow tube membrane can become compromised, so always carry Aquimira with you as a backup. I've been experimenting with both tent and hammock camping, and you might look at a hammock instead of a tent. So much more comfortable if you go with a Hennessy Expedition Asym or something comparable...you lay in them slightly diagonal and you're almost flat. I really love my JetBoil Flash, too. Run a comparison between that and the pocket rocket. What is your cooking plan? All I'm doing is boiling water and making freezer bag meals. If you're planning on actually cooking in lightweight pots and skillets, the pocket rocket would serve you better.
    Thanks for the advice! I've have tried hammock camping before, but never on a long distance hike. My biggest concern is staying dry, and I assume a tarp could be used but I would need to find one that is ultra light. I also planned on just boiling some water and making freezer bag meals. What type of pot do you use to boil your water?

    Thanks,
    Libby

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by libbsmac View Post
    Thanks for the advice! I've have tried hammock camping before, but never on a long distance hike. My biggest concern is staying dry, and I assume a tarp could be used but I would need to find one that is ultra light. I also planned on just boiling some water and making freezer bag meals. What type of pot do you use to boil your water?

    Thanks,
    Libby
    I also do FBC. I use a 900ml Snow Peak titanium pot so about the same size as the one you are thinking about. It was $53 on Amazon. I have a 700ml SP pot also that would work just fine also, but I got the bigger one so my fuel canister would fit inside in order to save space.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DuneElliot View Post
    Your list looks amazingly similar to mine for my planned thru-hikes (CT and PCT). I love my Arc Haul and Duplex. I'd highly suggest getting a few of the options (buckles on the sides to fold the top over, the extra mesh pockets, hip-belt pockets and the double top straps). Just bear in mind their long lead time. My Duplex took two months to get to me.

    A couple of things jump out to me. One, check out Enlightened Equipment for quilts or a hoodless sleeping bag for lightweight but more affordable sleeping bag. I have the EE Convert and paid $300 for it. I think the price recently went up, but still $130 cheaper than the WM Ultralight for less weight.

    You might also want to check out Cascade Designs flick-lock (not twist lock) trekking poles for $45 and 16oz/pair. I got them on a recommendation and short and long-term reviews from renowned LD hiker Andrew Skurka:
    http://andrewskurka.com/2015/cascade...-poles-review/

    http://andrewskurka.com/2015/long-te...ck-lock-poles/

    I use a few dry bags for organization (toiletries, FA kit etc) since I already have them, but mostly line my pack with a trash compactor bag for water protection.
    I have heard it takes a while to get the custom made tents from Zpacks. Is the tent durable? I really love the style and components of the tent but I have heard it only last for one long distance hike (like the AT).
    Thank you so much for the Enlightened Equipment recommendation! It is much cheaper, and I enjoy the style more... definitely adding that to my list. I also like the poles much better than the ones I had picked. Thank you sos much for all of the advice, you were very very helpful!

    Thanks,
    Libby

  8. #8

    Default

    It took me 8 weeks (2 weeks longer than what was advertised when ordered) to get my Duplex. As with anything ultra-light, and especially cuben, you are paying for weight reduction vs durability. Cuben really suffers from abrasion, including being pulled in and out of the stuff sack. I'm saving mine for my PCT thru-hike and will use my SMD Lunar Solo for shorter trips. How long the ZPacks tents last seems to be around 200 hundred nights of use, but obviously I'm not speaking from experience since I only just received it last week. I also think that it makes a difference whether you get the thicker cuben. I went with the .74oz spruce over the thinner but lighter .51oz. I'm hoping the extra 2oz and $15 is worth it for the added durability.

  9. #9

    Default

    200 nights is an approximation. Here is one of the reviews from the ZPacks site. If careful with your gear it seems that you can get a lot more than 200 nights:

    "On September 27th, 2013 we finished the CDT and completed our Triple Crown. I was carrying the Hexamid Solo you made for me, and Cheese was carrying the Hexamid Twin that we shared last year on the PCT. The thing is bomb proof! Cheese's tent has survived not only this hike, but also our PCT thru-hike in 2012. We've weathered wind storms above 12,000 feet, hailstorms, monsoon-like rains, and even took an on-trail zero in the Hexamid Twin during a day of constant downpour and 35 degree weather. Through it all, your tents kept us and our sleeping bags dry and sane." -Swiss Cheese and Bone Lady, PCT 2012, CDT 2013

  10. #10
    GSMNP 900 Miler
    Join Date
    02-25-2007
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Age
    53
    Posts
    4,605
    Journal Entries
    1
    Images
    5

    Default

    I would recommend the the Snow Peak LiteMax over the MSR Pocket Rocket.
    For starters, the LiteMax is lighter than the Pocket Rocket and packs down smaller as well.
    But I mainly recommend it because pots sitting on the LiteMax seem to be more stable.
    The supports on the Pocket Rocket do not fold out flat. That leaves the pot effectively resting on three needle points.
    By contrast, the LiteMax supports fold flat and so there are many more points of contact between the stove and the pot.
    The 'deployed' width of the supports for the LiteMax and Pocket Rocket are the same, so its still easy to knock a pot of the stove if you are not careful. But what you can do to help reduce your chance of knocking the pot over with either stove is to align your pot handle with one of the three support legs. The worst spot for the pot handle is between supports (a relatively small push down on the handle can easily be enough to knock your stove off).

    Yes, the LiteMax is $20 more than the Pocket Rocket, but having used both, I recommend the extra cash.

  11. #11

    Default

    In regards to what HooKoo mentioned. I know nothing about the Pocket Rocket, but I will +1 on Snow Peak stoves. I have a SP Giga and really like it. It fits perfectly in my SP pot with fuel and a bandana and a lighter.

  12. #12

    Default

    do you already own the Coast HL7 Headlamp? I do and I don't recommend it...

    Coast very quietly claims it is "weather resistant" but it has no IPX rating and sooner or later it's going to get wet.

    it's heavy and it's cumbersome with the battery compartment at the back of the head strap, connected to the LED module on the front by a curly cord.

    it puts out great light with the variable focus from spot to flood and it's rheostat-type power lever, but at 285 lumens it's way more powerful than you need and it eats batteries like a fat kid at the Golden Corral. that's great if your primary need is moving at night - trail running, riding a bicycle, or route finding, but I think it was made for construction work outdoors (I think it's kind of revealing that it comes with clips to hold it on your hardhat).

    it doesn't have a red LED, and I know that's not important to everyone but I like it. put it all together and I think there's much better choices for a backpacking headlamp. even the cheap Energizer headlamp is a better choice, IMO...

  13. #13

    Default

    The jetboil systems boil water much faster than other canister type stoves, which saves fuel as well as time. The flip side of that efficiency is the weight; they weigh more.

  14. #14

    Default

    I don't know your budget situation, and by you list it looks like 35$ for the stove won't break your bank, BUT if you want to save 25$ to out into something else, Amazon sells an amazing knockoff of the pocket rocket.http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B01A7R...t+hiking+stove

    And normally I not for buying knockoffs for longn distance expeditions, but I have read many many reviews that have said there Amazon stove lasted thru multiple long distance hikes.. Just an option..

    -Platypus

    PS: I know some people love their bladders (and I carry one, but it's mainly for camp use, I hate going to the water source on the AT, it's always downhill (that's obviously where water flows) and it's normally a pretty good walk from the shelter or campsite. But for absolute weight and maybe even convenience, just carry smaetwater bottles (can get at most gas stations, or I bought to 1liter ones from best buy yesterday lol) and they screw into the Sawyer filters..

  15. #15

    Default

    BTW--- I went with the knock off for my thru hike starting next week.

  16. #16
    Registered User AngryGerman's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-30-2012
    Location
    Broome County NY
    Age
    41
    Posts
    128

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MtDoraDave View Post
    The jetboil systems boil water much faster than other canister type stoves, which saves fuel as well as time. The flip side of that efficiency is the weight; they weigh more.
    The Jetboil Micro weighs 9oz stripped down w/o fuel. Leave the fuel canister stabilizer and cover at home. With fuel it weighs an impressive 12.5oz. Most canister stoves; pots and fuel weigh pretty darn close to that of the Jetboil! I take the speed/weight of the Jetboil any day. I've even used the cat can stoves and when it comes to overall weight, boil time and pack-ability I chose the Jetboil.


    Off to a great start OP. As an UL lad I like to see UL gear on here but make sure you do your research. A couple of items on your list aren't the greatest in terms of longevity.
    "I choose to carry very little, but that little is chosen with care." Earl V. Shaffer

  17. #17
    Registered User jjozgrunt's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-22-2014
    Location
    Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
    Age
    62
    Posts
    489

    Default

    I've used many headlights but my favourite for a number of years has been the Tikka R+ by Petzl. https://www.petzl.com/US/en/Sport/PE...S#.VzKEJIR96Uk
    Light wt, rechargeable (no batteries), programmable light settings etc.

    Also a big fan of the jetboil, strip it down and the fuel savings make the little extra wt acceptable.
    "He was a wise man who invented beer." Plato

  18. #18
    Hiker bigcranky's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-22-2002
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Age
    58
    Posts
    7,906
    Images
    296

    Default

    I've used a lot of the three-AAA battery headlamps over the years, but I really like my new Zebralight headlamp that uses a single AA battery. It's bright, easily controllable, battery replacement is simple, and it's light weight.

    +1 on the Jetboil. I never got along with the Pocket Rocket, I felt like the pointy pot supports weren't all that supportive. The cost of your pot plus the stove will cover a Jetboill.

    You are getting top of the line pack, tent, and bag.

    I prefer using 1-liter wide mouth Gatorade bottles for water, they cost less than a buck and come filled with free Gatorade. I can keep them clean, and replace them at any grocery store. The Sawyer Squeeze is a fine filter, we use one. We also bring Aqua Mira tablets as a backup.

    We don't bring much in the way of toiletries. Toothbrush and a travel toothpaste. Purell. Baby wipes. We have occasionally shared a travel bottle of shampoo so we could shower at a park service or forest service campground if we know there is one on the section we are hiking -- you can get a really nice shower out of a couple of bandanas and some shampoo.
    Ken B
    'Big Cranky'
    Our Long Trail journal

  19. #19
    Registered User Kaptainkriz's Avatar
    Join Date
    06-28-2015
    Location
    Leonardtown, Maryland
    Age
    51
    Posts
    598
    Journal Entries
    50
    Images
    18

    Default

    This lamp is awesome!

    Quote Originally Posted by bigcranky View Post
    I've used a lot of the three-AAA battery headlamps over the years, but I really like my new Zebralight headlamp that uses a single AA battery. It's bright, easily controllable, battery replacement is simple, and it's light weight.
    Plaid is fast! Ticks suck, literally...
    Follow my hiking adventures: https://www.youtube.com/user/KrizAkoni
    Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/alphagalhikes/

  20. #20
    Registered User ggreaves's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-13-2013
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Age
    53
    Posts
    190

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by libbsmac View Post
    Thanks for the advice! I've have tried hammock camping before, but never on a long distance hike. My biggest concern is staying dry, and I assume a tarp could be used but I would need to find one that is ultra light. I also planned on just boiling some water and making freezer bag meals. What type of pot do you use to boil your water?

    Thanks,
    Libby
    if you plan on simmering any meals in the pot, don't get titanium. It's very easy to burn the food. Go for an anodized aluminum pot like the olicamp xts or something similar. you've got lots of light weight stuff so an extra few grams won't hurt. I use an optimus crux for a stove. it folds up and nests under the dimple in a fuel canister. very small and a great stove.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
++ New Posts ++

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •