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  1. #21
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    Well my date is set July 19th.. Thanks everyone for the help given here. The purpose being I need to find a cheap way to do all this. Some of you may have misread or interpreted my posts so I apologize for your confusion.

    I may still end up having to take my pack up the mountain and if so I will be choosing the easiest trail possible. I am actually in good shape and have no trouble taking all the time in the world. I cant claim to be an expert hiker although I have been across America several times over the course of a 10 year stretch. Hitchhiking however is not the same as trail hiking. Done both.. I have also spent more then a few years living in primitive environments so although some of what I do seems nuts to the majority it is just common sense to me. I doubt most people ever have to get used to doing a monthly food run that requires a 36 mile round trip hike in which the last half is done with a very full pack and 40lbs of dog food over your shoulder. (in less then a day)

    I do not run marathons.. I smoke.. Thanks for your concerns on that aspect but I know I will be fine come what may. Hopefully yes I will drop my pack and do the mountain without but I wont let it stop me if I have to carry it.

    Peakbagger, those White mountains are what made me fall in love with finding them new frontiers. Absolutely the most beautiful place I have ever been, although the National forest just outside Eugene Oregon are a very close second for me. That's all perspective though to each their own.

    Truth be told after doing that mountain if facing a 40+ dollar fee to carry on... or just say a few hours after the sun went down I just sat down on the trail heading out of the park leaned my self up against my pack and let my eyes close for a bit.. Well who's to say that's 'camping' and not just resting?
    R.E.M = Restorative Energy Meditation

    I respect deeply the US forestry service.. Well the rangers I met anyways. We do not always see things the same I just do not want to start out on the wrong foot and was seeking help on cheaper alternatives here. I always find them.. Even at the bottom of dumpsters..

    Again thanks to everyone here for your input.. Lets do this again sometime!
    If you are afraid of bears, then don't go into the woods dressed up and smelling like a berry bush.

  2. #22

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    You don't want to break any rules in Baxter. They will be on the lookout for rule breakers to make an example out of this year. It's not clear if you made reservations for a campsite in the park, but if you haven't and plan to "sneak in and out", you'd best forget about climbing Katahdin and just head into the 100 mile wilderness right off.
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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by wdanner View Post
    Unless you're already conditioned for long-distance hiking, like you run ultra-marathon trail races on your weekends, the Katahdin summit takes most of the day. Don't end your hike before it begins!
    I plan to hike sobo in 2017; I will be 66 yo at the start. My health is ok, but even with training between now and then, I'll need to go slow and steady instead of attacking the mountain when I start. With that in mind, what is the least strenuous route to climb and descend Katahdin from and back into ksc? Should I start my hike elsewhere in Baxter for an easier route? If so, how would one go about hiking Katahdin without the pack. I plan to begin the rest of the trail on the 2nd day after the descent instead of next day. Maybe I'm being too cautious. Any advice will be appreciated. The logistics are beginning to seem daunting.
    humor is the gadfly on the corpse of tragedy

  4. #24

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    There is NO easy way up and down Katahdin. The "easiest" (being the least steep overall) would be the Saddle Trail leaving from Chimney pond campground. Even so, this 2.2 mile trail has 2,353 feet of elevation gain and the estimated time is 3.5 hours to climb to Pamola peak (the actual summit) - is just slightly better then a 1/2 mile an hour pace. You may want to skip climbing this mountain your first day out.
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  5. #25
    Registered User egilbe's Avatar
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    I'm curious how the new rebuilt Abol trail will be. From the sounds of it, it may become the least strenuous. Still won't be easy. It's a big mountain.

  6. #26

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    From the looks of the Abol Trail, I would not plan on it being the least strenous. I hiked the Saddle last week, and it was easy compared to the Hunt. I expect Abol will be right up there with Cathedral, maybe tougher. I will liet you know in a couple of weeks. ; )
    Forget not that the earth delights to feel your bare feet and the winds long to play with your hair. -Kahlil Gibran

  7. #27
    Registered User egilbe's Avatar
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    I still haven't descended on Hunt. Too afraid of heights. :-)

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by greensleep View Post
    I plan to hike sobo in 2017; I will be 66 yo at the start. My health is ok, but even with training between now and then, I'll need to go slow and steady instead of attacking the mountain when I start. With that in mind, what is the least strenuous route to climb and descend Katahdin from and back into ksc? Should I start my hike elsewhere in Baxter for an easier route? If so, how would one go about hiking Katahdin without the pack. I plan to begin the rest of the trail on the 2nd day after the descent instead of next day. Maybe I'm being too cautious. Any advice will be appreciated. The logistics are beginning to seem daunting.
    Look at the AT Lodge website, they offer shuttles packages especially for SOBOs. By 2017 there will be two trails leading up from near Katahdin Stream Campground, but as of now there is only the Hunt. You can leave your pack at Katahdin Stream ranger station, they have free daypacks there for your use. The 'easier' trails are on the back side of the mountain, but still very strenous, and logistically difficult.
    Last edited by chiefduffy; 06-18-2016 at 18:50.
    Forget not that the earth delights to feel your bare feet and the winds long to play with your hair. -Kahlil Gibran

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    You don't want to break any rules in Baxter. They will be on the lookout for rule breakers to make an example out of this year. It's not clear if you made reservations for a campsite in the park, but if you haven't and plan to "sneak in and out", you'd best forget about climbing Katahdin and just head into the 100 mile wilderness right off.
    I know there is a fee to park a car there, and for campsites. I posted the Fees in my original post so I am aware of them. I am also aware there is a tendency based on the more experienced input here to suggest an accepted belief that it is 'un possible' to climb the mountain and hike out of the park in one day.

    I am still talking to my family member driving me up there who is currently out of the states and I need to determine their plan for nailing my last strings down so I do not have a reservation yet, but can set one up if necessary. Although now that you bring it up about just hitting the 100 Mile wilderness I am actually thinking that is not such a bad plan.. I can get myself up there next year just to do the climb so I can "officially" call myself a thru hiker of the AT trail.

    If you can answer:
    Is there a fee just to hike the mountain? Or out of the park? Lastly is there some sort of curfew for hiking the trail?

    Thanks in advance for any light you can shed on these questions I do appreciate your time on this.
    If you are afraid of bears, then don't go into the woods dressed up and smelling like a berry bush.

  10. #30
    Registered User egilbe's Avatar
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    There is an out of state car fee of $14 thats separate fron any campsite or leanto reservation. You need to allow time to go up and back down before dark. You dont want to be trying to climb down in the dark. The Rangers will be really annoyed with you and you can be charged for any rescue you may require. Normally, the rangers will discourage anyone from starting out after 11am, or 12pm. Most of the nobo through hikers can do it in 7 or 8 hours. Normal people will take anywhere from 8 to 14 hours...and have a real hard time walking the next day.

    People have climbed Katahdin and hiked out the next day. Its not impossible, but highly improbable.

  11. #31
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    Okay so sort of an honor curfew on the mountain. Totally understandable. Sorry about all these last minute questions but again thanks for you help here. 8-14 hours is great info there as far as time perspective goes I am guessing with a day pack for that average time. So just one more thing then The other trail heads up the mountain is there parking fees do you know? or a line check to get in?
    If you are afraid of bears, then don't go into the woods dressed up and smelling like a berry bush.

  12. #32
    Registered User egilbe's Avatar
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    $14 to get into the park. Parking lots fill up. Roaring Brook will close early on the weekends. Midweek, they is almost always room in the parking lots. You can get a Day Use Parking Reservation which, I believe, is no charge. It reserves space in the parking lots, usually either Roaring Brook or KSC. Once you get through the front gate, you have use of the entire park, if space is available.

    http://www.baxterstateparkauthority....servations.htm
    Last edited by egilbe; 06-19-2016 at 20:46.

  13. #33
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    I am just getting dropped off so that sounds good even 14$ is something I can easily swing. Going to be coming from out of state so how ever it goes the car itself is not my personal worry. Looking at these 'Back country' camp sites rates at 20$ a night are these marked out on the maps? Any idea whats up with them?
    If you are afraid of bears, then don't go into the woods dressed up and smelling like a berry bush.

  14. #34

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    Baxter State Park is a really big place with 40+ named peaks inside the park, along with many lakes and streams. Back country campsites are just that, way back in remote parts of the park. You go to those places to really be in the forsaken wilderness.
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  15. #35
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slo-go'en View Post
    There is NO easy way up and down Katahdin. The "easiest" (being the least steep overall) would be the Saddle Trail leaving from Chimney pond campground. Even so, this 2.2 mile trail has 2,353 feet of elevation gain and the estimated time is 3.5 hours to climb to Pamola peak (the actual summit) - is just slightly better then a 1/2 mile an hour pace. You may want to skip climbing this mountain your first day out.
    First of all, read my signature for my hiking abilities and I was 70 on March 21 of this year.
    Now, look at the attached summary of my first hike since forever. The trail is the Profile trail to Calloway Peak in Grandfather Mountain State Park, NC.
    A round trip from Hwy 105. The bulk of the elevation gain is in the first 3 miles. The "trail" from mile 2.7 to mile 3.0 is an inclined boulder field and climbs approximately 600'.
    Argus summary:



    Comparing the Profile trail to the trail description above, what's all the fuss about? Just curious.

    BTW, reading "Called Again" includes an interesting version of starting a SOBO hike on June 20-21.
    Cheers.

    Wayne


    Old. Slow. "Smarter than the average bear."
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  16. #36

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    Comparing the Profile trail to the trail description above, what's all the fuss about? Just curious.

    Respectfully comparing any trails in NC to Baxter State Park is not going to work. The mountains in NC are mostly dirt tracks, most of BSP trails are much rockier down low rapidly switching to boulders that progress up to the size of house. You get to crawl over and under them for extended periods. There are no trees to block the wind and oncoming weather and many of the trails are exposed ridges. Once you get up to summit plateau you have a mile stroll through a rock field there the only living thing is occasional clumps of very low shrubs in low spots.

    More than a few folks "from away" and locals come to Maine (or the whites) under estimating Katahdin and end up regretting it. Many folks end up on the trail for 12 plus hours. Slow and steady works but water sources at elevation are few and far between so many folks doing the slow and steady route end up getting dehydrated and cramps.

  17. #37
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    Fair enough. I get it. Thanks.

    Wayne


    Old. Slow. "Smarter than the average bear."
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  18. #38
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    Baxter Rangers recommend taking 3 to 4 liters of water. The last reliable water on the Hunt trail is Katahdin Stream falls. There is a three mile, fairly steep and rocky, completely exposed, climb until you get to the fairly flat, but Rocky tablelands. Thoreau spring is an unreliable water source, but I've seen water geysering out of it after 7 inches of rain fell the night before.

    Then you have to hike back down. You are exhausted, you are dehydrated, and the nearest water is Caribou Spring, which doesn't lead you off the mountain and adds several more miles to your hike. Katahdin is the reason I no longer use water bladders. Running out at the top sucks.

  19. #39
    Registered User egilbe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Venchka View Post
    First of all, read my signature for my hiking abilities and I was 70 on March 21 of this year.
    Now, look at the attached summary of my first hike since forever. The trail is the Profile trail to Calloway Peak in Grandfather Mountain State Park, NC.
    A round trip from Hwy 105. The bulk of the elevation gain is in the first 3 miles. The "trail" from mile 2.7 to mile 3.0 is an inclined boulder field and climbs approximately 600'.
    Argus summary:



    Comparing the Profile trail to the trail description above, what's all the fuss about? Just curious.

    BTW, reading "Called Again" includes an interesting version of starting a SOBO hike on June 20-21.
    Cheers.

    Wayne


    Old. Slow. "Smarter than the average bear."
    Hunt trail is 4188 feet of elevation gain, most of that in a three mile section above tree line. My gf got 45,000 steps, according to her Fitbit. My exercise app calculated 8000 calories burned that day, but it also said we hiked 14 miles. We started at 6:00 am and finished at 7:30pm.

    It's a balance of avoiding dehydration, exhaustion, and finishing before dark. And not injuring yourself, of course.

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