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Thread: Which Tent?

  1. #41
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    I've been looking at the lightheart gear tents. I'm planning a thru hike in 2018 but will going with my service dog, a 125# Akita. Might want to take a look at them. http://www.lightheartgear.com/

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    In the shadows AfterParty's Avatar
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    I switched to a hammock but if was to buy a tent it would be the protrail from tarp tent.
    Hiking the AT is “pointless.” What life is not “pointless”? Is it not pointless to work paycheck to paycheck just to conform?.....I want to make my life less ordinary. AWOL

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by PapaBear187 View Post
    I've been looking at the lightheart gear tents. I'm planning a thru hike in 2018 but will going with my service dog, a 125# Akita. Might want to take a look at them. http://www.lightheartgear.com/
    My daughter and I share a LHG Solong 6.

  4. #44

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    There's no best tent for all conditions. If you hike a lot you will own many tents. Same thing with packs, bags, etc.
    So it's time to start building your collection....

  5. #45

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    I have the Nemo Hornet and love it. Probably one of if not the lightest and most packable freestanding tent on the market
    - Young Blood | AT2015 | PCT2016 | CDT2017

  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by YoungBloodOnTrail View Post
    I have the Nemo Hornet and love it. Probably one of if not the lightest and most packable freestanding tent on the market
    Pretty much true! Only the BA fly creek (probably the platinum model) is as light, maybe an ounce lighter.

    Here's a decent little article on the advantages of double-wall tents, and a list of the lightest ones:

    http://sectionhiker.com/advantages-o...-walled-tents/

    Edit: just took a look, and it's the regular BA fly creek that's nearly the same weight as the Nemo, just under 2 pounds, the BA fly creek "platinum" is 1 lb 9 oz, probably the lightest free-standing 2-person traditional double wall tent out there.
    Last edited by colorado_rob; 10-09-2016 at 08:43.

  7. #47
    Registered User GriZZiLLa_Ga-Me09's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fiona View Post
    I know there have been a lot of posts regarding tents, but there seems to be so many different opinions and I'm super confused. I plan to start at the beginning of March. Which tent should I buy? Im hiking on my own.
    I got the Big Agnes fly creek UL1 for my 2017 thru. Has plenty of room inside for 1 plus a cuddle buddy, and a vestibule the rain fly creates for pack space. This will be my second thru and I am definitely a tent man. But this is all personal preference. If going with a tarp you might want to also invest in a no-se-ums net for bugs in the summer.

  8. #48
    Registered User jjozgrunt's Avatar
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    I was going with a hammock and tarp, as I stated earlier. Changed my mind and decided to go with my trusty Duplex. Makes the pack lighter and I sleep just as well lying on the ground or swinging in the air.
    "He was a wise man who invented beer." Plato

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by sliverstorm View Post
    Have a Hilleberg 2 man 4 season tunnel. Haven't had it for long, but I already love it, especially after trying to camp on blowing snow in a 3-season.

    We'll see if I like it quite as much outside of snow & high winds. It offers some flexibility (pitch just the rainfly, or just the nest) for lighter weather, but might not be worth carrying even in cut-down trim.
    Which one do you have, the Nallo, Nammatj, Kaitum or Keron?? Or whatever else?

    Quote Originally Posted by Elaikases View Post
    A four season tent includes a separate snow flap. There are a number of tents used for winter (things like https://www.rei.com/product/101572/h...he-cave-3-tent which is used for winter camping in Alaska -- I would not recommend it for the AT) that are "three season" because they lack the snow flaps.

    As a result, many, many "three season" tents are fine for light, or even heavy (winter in Alaska and 80 mph winds, see above) winter conditions.

    But the labels can be confusing, to say the least.
    Snow flaps? None of my Hilleberg four season tents have snow flaps. My MSR Fury 4-season doesn't have snow flaps. In fact, not any of my tents in the last many decades had snow flaps. These are snow flaps---(not fabric on the ground)---



    Quote Originally Posted by Venchka View Post
    If you want to learn about tents for multiple seasons, study Hilleberg tents. The black and red label tents have been used worldwide and year round.
    Wayne
    Old. Slow. "Smarter than the average bear."
    The only tent I use now for all my trips is a Hilleberg tunnel. Summer and winter. Why summer? Because the worst winds are often in the summer atop open balds in terrible thunderstorms. Are Hillebergs perfect? Nope, but then again no tent is perfect. Show me a guy who uses whatever tent and if he has nothing critical to say about it he just hasn't used it enough.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hosh View Post
    Marmot, Mountain Hardware and North Face have made mountaineering expedition caliber equipment for decades. While I won't eliminate Hilleberg, base camps are dominated by the big 3.

    Very few backpackers need an expedition quality tent. They are designed for high winds and heavy snow loads. A well designed ultra light tent is effective deep into the shoulder seasons.
    I agree that most of the tents I see on my trips are 3 season tents like Big Agnes and REI and Sierra Designs and a few Marmots and a few North Face and a handful of Tarptents and the occasional Bibler. The current fascination and fad now is for either single wall tents or for double wall nets with mesh/net inner tents. A mesh inner IS NOT a double wall tent. And if you plan on doing any extensive backpacking in the Southeast mountains, you will rethink your desire to use a single wall tent as condensation as times is overwhelming. Even under a tarp. "At times" means maybe not for a weekend trip but stretch a trip out for 3 weeks and dripping condensation will happen, especially on a cold night in a wet snow.

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