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Thread: Which Tent?

  1. #21
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    We had guests over this week from Gladstone ,Qld. Saw their first snow .

    thom

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by nsherry61 View Post
    Go buy a tarp (cheap plastic 8x10 to start with). Learn to pitch it well. Have fun.

    Tents are more fuss to pitch, weigh more, cost more, are limited in pitch flexibility, limit your self expression, isolate you from the world you're out to experience, and don't make you look as cool and tough as the girl that can pitch and live under a tarp.
    All so very true.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by nsherry61 View Post
    First, it looks to me like you are looking for a tent, and that's fine. I just find it interesting how many people discount a tarp, especially in the winter, without trying it. As for "tried and tested", tarps have a longer history than any tent brand I know of, and the advantages listed above still hold for winter tarping, but on snow, having an open floor, gives even more creative comfort options with digging foot wells and sleeping shelves etc. And, if using shelters, tarps make better wind breaks/doors than tents do. If you have any inclination, I'd encourage you to try and play around with it a bit.
    Also, no bugs in winter, just ad a separate net later in your trip, if you wish.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

  4. #24
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    Originally Posted by nsherry61
    Go buy a tarp (cheap plastic 8x10 to start with). Learn to pitch it well. Have fun.

    Tents are more fuss to pitch, weigh more, cost more, are limited in pitch flexibility, limit your self expression, isolate you from the world you're out to experience, and don't make you look as cool and tough as the girl that can pitch and live under a tarp.


    Quote Originally Posted by Feral Bill View Post
    All so very true.
    Disagree. All might be valid points but so very UNtrue ... for this hiker anyway. (Maybe someone else though, that has experience and time to practice using a tarp.) Original Poster stated a start date of early Mar. That is maybe 3 weeks to research, purchase, receive and then figure out how to use. The time to 'learn to pitch it well' should not be on Springer Mountain, which given the time constraints is likely. A tent is much easier to figure out how to set-up.

    If more time were available maybe ...

    See you on the trail,
    mt squid

    some observations

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by egilbe View Post
    This thread has me looking at 2 person Hilleberg tents. Four or five pound tents, to me, in the winter, is reasonable.
    Amen Brother!
    On the other hand, the Scarp 2 with crossing poles is ~ 3 1/2 pounds.
    I've pondered this tent purchase until I have decision paralysis.

    Wayne


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    Deep in the East Texas Rainforest.
    "Lately it occurs to me What a long, strange trip it's been." Grateful Dead

  6. #26
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    I'm probably wrong on the Scarp 2. Maybe it's the Scarp 1 @ 3 1/2 - 4 pounds.
    I said I had totally confused myself. I need a spreadsheet. Yikes!

    Wayne


    Sent from somewhere around here.
    Deep in the East Texas Rainforest.
    "Lately it occurs to me What a long, strange trip it's been." Grateful Dead

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by egilbe View Post
    This thread has me looking at 2 person Hilleberg tents. Four or five pound tents, to me, in the winter, is reasonable.
    Have a Hilleberg 2 man 4 season tunnel. Haven't had it for long, but I already love it, especially after trying to camp on blowing snow in a 3-season.

    We'll see if I like it quite as much outside of snow & high winds. It offers some flexibility (pitch just the rainfly, or just the nest) for lighter weather, but might not be worth carrying even in cut-down trim.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by mountain squid View Post
    Originally Posted by nsherry61
    Go buy a tarp (cheap plastic 8x10 to start with). Learn to pitch it well. Have fun.

    Tents are more fuss to pitch, weigh more, cost more, are limited in pitch flexibility, limit your self expression, isolate you from the world you're out to experience, and don't make you look as cool and tough as the girl that can pitch and live under a tarp.




    Disagree. All might be valid points but so very UNtrue ... for this hiker anyway. (Maybe someone else though, that has experience and time to practice using a tarp.) Original Poster stated a start date of early Mar. That is maybe 3 weeks to research, purchase, receive and then figure out how to use. The time to 'learn to pitch it well' should not be on Springer Mountain, which given the time constraints is likely. A tent is much easier to figure out how to set-up.

    If more time were available maybe ...

    See you on the trail,
    mt squid

    some observations
    Perhaps you are right, given the time frame. It's short time to "learn" a tent as well, though.
    "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." ---Dr. Seuss

  9. #29
    Wanna-be hiker trash Sarcasm the elf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Venchka View Post
    Go to TarpTent.com.
    Under PRODUCTS select Choose Your TarpTent
    Click 1 person, thruhike & 4 seasons.
    The Moment DW and StratoSpire 1 pop up. Take your pick. You may wish to buy the solid interior for additional weather proofing.
    https://www.tarptent.com/allproducts.html



    Wayne
    +1 You can't go wrong with tarptent.

    As others have mentioned, for A.T. hiking you will see people almost exclusively using 3 season tents (or less). The term 4 season tent is more commonly used to describe a mountaineering class tent.
    Colorless green ideas sleep furiously.

  10. #30
    Wanna-be hiker trash Sarcasm the elf's Avatar
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    Just for the fun of it, here are some tarptents in the snow.

    3 Tarptents at Fingerboards shelter.JPG
    Colorless green ideas sleep furiously.

  11. #31
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    I'm going for the Terra Nova Solar Photon 2, lightweight and easy to put up

    <3

  12. #32
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    Hi Fiona - I've used the Zpacks Hexamid Solo Plus in snow, sleet and hail in the aussie alps and I have had no problems. For more room I'd go with their Duplex 2 person tent at under 600 grams. If you plan to use it here, in Australia, go the heavier .74 cubin. I'm starting on the 12th Mar but I plan to use a hammock, WBBB with a cubin fibre tarp.
    "He was a wise man who invented beer." Plato

  13. #33
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    Message me if you like.
    "He was a wise man who invented beer." Plato

  14. #34

    Post Some people do not understand "four season" -- the label can be confusing

    Quote Originally Posted by Cheyou View Post


    And these are all4 season?

    what ?? 4 season tent ? U better check out some finishers equipment lists.
    A four season tent includes a separate snow flap. There are a number of tents used for winter (things like https://www.rei.com/product/101572/h...he-cave-3-tent which is used for winter camping in Alaska -- I would not recommend it for the AT) that are "three season" because they lack the snow flaps.

    As a result, many, many "three season" tents are fine for light, or even heavy (winter in Alaska and 80 mph winds, see above) winter conditions.

    But the labels can be confusing, to say the least.

  15. #35
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    The product at the other end of the link is a joke, right?
    If you want to learn about tents for multiple seasons, study Hilleberg tents. The black and red label tents have been used worldwide and year round.
    Wayne


    Old. Slow. "Smarter than the average bear."
    Deep in the East Texas Rainforest.
    "Lately it occurs to me What a long, strange trip it's been." Grateful Dead

  16. #36
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    Marmot, Mountain Hardware and North Face have made mountaineering expedition caliber equipment for decades. While I won't eliminate Hilleberg, base camps are dominated by the big 3.

    Very few backpackers need an expedition quality tent. They are designed for high winds and heavy snow loads. A well designed ultra light tent is effective deep into the shoulder seasons.

  17. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elaikases View Post
    A four season tent includes a separate snow flap. There are a number of tents used for winter (things like https://www.rei.com/product/101572/h...he-cave-3-tent which is used for winter camping in Alaska -- I would not recommend it for the AT) that are "three season" because they lack the snow flaps.

    As a result, many, many "three season" tents are fine for light, or even heavy (winter in Alaska and 80 mph winds, see above) winter conditions.

    But the labels can be confusing, to say the least.
    i don't think fuller himself would sleep in that thing. Kinda cool lookin' though, but way to over engineer and industrial.

  18. #38

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    ...and should also add that it is quick to set up which is pretty neat in a gale.

  19. #39
    In the shadows AfterParty's Avatar
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    I just got a marmot 2p starlight. Only 3 lbs and roomy for 1.

  20. #40
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    You can get the Flycreek UL2 Chinese knock-off for under $50, about 3 lbs I believe.

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