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  1. #21
    Registered User Ratbert's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by esc2476
    Wookie, I got a new dSLR (Canon 20D) recently and will be doing a section hike and am curious about the best way to carry such a camera on the trail while having it readily available. I would think around the neck, but all the bouncing around can't be good for the camera or my chest. Any ideas?
    These work pretty good for me.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...goryNavigation

    They clip onto your shoulder strap D-rings with metal clips (overkill) and then you just pop the fastex buckles to unhook and shoot. Or, use these to attach a zoom padded holster if you want full protection for your 20D. Lowepro has nice holsters because certain models open away from you, making access easier.

    Having it on your chest takes a little getting used to, which might make wearing it your hipbelt a better option. If you do use these clips for the chest set-up, you can secure the bottom with an elastic cord or something similar to make it a tad more secure. Either way, it makes putting your pack on and taking it off just a trifle more of a headache. But, you'll get a lot more shots than you will with your camera in your pack!

  2. #22
    tideblazer
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    Quote Originally Posted by esc2476
    no, do you have any specific suggestions?
    Thanks
    If you don't have a hipbelt than I would use a light bag that just carries what you need to pull it out and get a shot, i.e., one that holds the SLR body, one lens, and a couple pockets for lens cleaning materials, extra film/memory cards, filters, ect. To carry filters I use a Compact Disk neoprene filter case that attaches to my camera bag strap.

    The trick is to get the smallest, lightest one that will hold the camera securely so that you can access it with out taking your pack off.

    I've tried chest harnesses, but they invariably get sweaty and bounce around too much. So far a bag like this is the only that works: http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/st...berId=12500226

    It's just an example. I'm not suggesting to buy this bag. But it's the style that I suggest -just fits what you need. If you want to change lenses, you can store the lens in a different place. Island Mama made me a lens case out of sil-nylon and neoprene that I attach on my shoulder strap so I can change lenses without taking my pack off. For me, it's the only way it could work -if I had it on my hip, then it would be too much weight with the SLR and other lens and it would become unweildy. At times I took the hip bag off and stored it in my pack (especially when the light was not good for photos). Other times I carried it in my hand and did bicep curls to keep my upper body looking like the lower.

    See this picture: http://www.aldha.org/wcoast.htm

    There you can see how I carried the other lens on my shoulder strap (the green bag that everyone asked me about).

    This other picture from the AP shows my whole set-up: http://www.dailygamecock.com/media/s...lygamecock.com

    Let me know if I can help more
    Last edited by Tha Wookie; 04-09-2006 at 19:33.
    www.ridge2reef.org -Organic Tropical Farm, Farm Stays, Group Retreats.... Trail life in the Caribbean

  3. #23
    Registered User esc2476's Avatar
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    Thanks for your suggestions guys.....I am going to take a look at all of these options. I appreciate the time and responses.

  4. #24
    tideblazer
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    Quote Originally Posted by esc2476
    Thanks for your suggestions guys.....I am going to take a look at all of these options. I appreciate the time and responses.
    Please note, everyone, that I meant to say "Compact Disk neoprene filter case" above [edited 4/9] instead of "neoprene filter case".
    www.ridge2reef.org -Organic Tropical Farm, Farm Stays, Group Retreats.... Trail life in the Caribbean

  5. #25
    Cultural Resource Destroying Speed Hiker
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    You don't need anyone's permission to take a picture, but it is good to be respectful. Remember, you need to get permission if you are going to publish an image. So if it's a good one, get their conact info, and name always.
    You don't necessarily need someone's permission to publish an photograph that has them in the image. Many factors are involved, from the end use of the image, to how recognizable the person is/isn't in the image.

    Generally, if it's for any kind of advertising, you should get a model release, but if it's editorial use and the person appears "incidentally" in the image, you do not need their permission in most cases.

    Doing a web search for "fair use" or "model releases" will bring up the kind of information you will need.

    Here's a start at:http://www.danheller.com/model-release.html#5

  6. #26
    Rain Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SGT Rock View Post
    SGT Rock,

    Thanks for inserting the correct link. Any way to fix it in the 1st post in this thread, which just takes you straight back to the 1st post in this thread? The link from the Articles section of the home page does the same thing. Unless someone reads the thread to find your above post, they just get taken in circles. I'm not even sure that a Search for Photography will find the Article. Sorry to be adding to your To Do list!!!

    RainMan

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    ye shall not pollute the land wherein ye are: ... Defile not therefore the land which ye shall inhabit..... Numbers 35

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  7. #27
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    Great info.

    One other piece of advice for digital cameras, plan your shot before turning the camera on. Try to avoid browsing pictures on the camera itself and spending lots of time with various settings. That burns batteries fast. SD chips are so cheap now, and almost weightless that there's no reason you can't carry enough for your whole trip without having to erase a single picture.

  8. #28

    Thumbs up $1 super lightweight tripod

    I couldn't imagine loading up my tripod for my thru next year - then I came across this brilliant homemade tripod idea. Basically, take a bolt that screws into your camera, attach it to a string, then use a large washer on the other end of a string that is your height. When you need the tripod, you stand on the washer at the end of the string to stabalize the camera and shoot.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by lizzieGAME09 View Post
    I couldn't imagine loading up my tripod for my thru next year - then I came across this brilliant homemade tripod idea. Basically, take a bolt that screws into your camera, attach it to a string, then use a large washer on the other end of a string that is your height. When you need the tripod, you stand on the washer at the end of the string to stabalize the camera and shoot.
    AWESOME! I love it! I'll give it a try for Turkey Day ... I've been looking for a way to get more stability for Thanksgiving photos without the tripod or flash.

    This section should be updated annually? Anyone volunteer? I just got a 16GB card for my DSLR for $60 on Amazon. Something like 1500 RAW images @ 10 megapixels.

    IS (images stabilization) lenses (or bodies now, too) and/or low f-stop lenses are another nice way to be able to shoot in lower-light situations without a flash or tripod. That combined with the string stabilizer should do a pretty nice job for everything up to 1/10 second exposures or so I would imagine. Maybe even more?

    The 18-55mm f/3.5 IS lense that came with my new Canon XS is surprisingly good for the weight and cost.

    I also have a 50mm Canon f/1.8 Mark I (metal) lense that is ridiculously light, small, and cheap and takes incredible shots. Now that I'm pretty much DSLR-only I'd like to get Canon's 28mm f/1.8 to offset the 1.6x focal length ... or a fullframe DSLR, but that isn't in the cards for this year. Or probably next.

  10. #30
    Registered User buzzamania's Avatar
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    Under the topic of Tripods the nifty little gizmo at http://www.thestickpic.com/ has proven to be a lightweight and great option for those who like to do a "walkumentary." Cheap and light weight, just make sure you secure your strap and order the right one to fit your set of poles. Good video reviews on Youtube.
    alifelongpursuit.blogspot.com

  11. #31

  12. #32
    Pilgrim of Serendipity
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    Did anyone notice that "photography" is misspelled in the title of this article? If it's going to be all official and stuff, maybe that should be fixed... If for no other reason, so it will come up properly when people search for "photography."
    Deuteronomy 23:12-13 "Designate a place outside the camp where you can go to relieve yourself. As part of your equipment have something to dig with… dig a hole and cover up your excrement."

  13. #33

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    Through all the discussion with cameras, film vs. digital, pixels, etc., I haven't seen any mention of using a camcorder on the trail. I was considering taking along a hard drive style HD videocam on a future AT hike, to make a video story. For example, Sony makes a 40 hour model that's less than 2 pounds. Even when I have to start the cam myself then walk into the picture, I can edit out those start-stop portions.
    I would like to hear some thought on this.

  14. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by esc2476 View Post
    Wookie, I got a new dSLR (Canon 20D) recently and will be doing a section hike and am curious about the best way to carry such a camera on the trail while having it readily available. I would think around the neck, but all the bouncing around can't be good for the camera or my chest. Any ideas?

    You might try one of these, although you may have problems manipulating the strap with a pack straps over it.

    http://www.blackrapid.com/

    Just out of curiosity, what lens will you be using on your section hike?

  15. #35
    ERNMAN
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    I carry my Nikon d-40 with extra lens ... I carry it in a hip bag with its own belt....very convienent. its a triangular bag that accepts the camera face down.. it padded and works great. I can get the camera out and a pic taken very quickly. Very comfortable.. Doesn t get in the way of the pack. It ran me about 60.00 .. I bought it at a photo shop so I probably paid a lil more.... Look online and find something. I love it.. e mail me if you want more info socrholic@hotmail.com

  16. #36
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    When in 1996, the Dawson County Chamber of Commerce members hiked from Nimblewill Church to the spot where the hike in trail was to be built to have a shovel dig ceremony, I carried a motorized Canon F-1 around my neck except when the sheeting rain hit us on the way up. Now that trek was only a mile or so but the camera part wasn't so bad. But as any news photog will tell you, f8 & be there is the way to get good shots. Now, 15 years later I'm finally starting to make plans for some section hiking and wouldn't think of carrying that piece of brass. But if I have a camera, it will be where I can almost instantly get off a shot. If it isn't instantly available, it might as well be left at home. My son's little Kodak with the wide leather strap made by an AP shooter will probably be what I carry.

  17. #37
    Registered User Hennessy's Avatar
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    I'm very much torn between taking my Powershot Elph (very light, full HD) and my Fujifilm Finepix 3D (not as light, 3D on the fly, shoddy 2D, eats through batteries.) I wonder, has anyone thru-hiked with a 3D camera? After viewing some of the 3D pics on nVidia's website, of various places around the world and some of their spectacular views, I am very tempted to take both. One for good, old fashioned 2D, and one for the breathtaking vistas. Weight in the pack though... what to do, what to do...

  18. #38
    Ohhh-Rraahhh!! Derek81pci's Avatar
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    Sony has the Cyber Shot on sale for $139 now. Just got mine int he mail today. Full HD and has a panoramic 360 degree shot taker. It's pretty nice. The media card won't arrive until tomorrow so I can't fully mess with it yet. The features I have been able to play with are really impressive! AND it only weighs 4oz!
    Live your life and I'll live mine, perhaps one day they will intertwine. SEMPER FI! 2013 SOBO

  19. #39

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    Thanks Chris. You have done great job!

  20. #40
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
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    ND filters: Wookie, Before I read your explanation, I knew all about ND filters, what they do, when to use them, etc. After reading your explanation I'm totally confused. No worries. I will continue to use my 3 stop ND filter with my Nikkor 50/1.4, Hexanon 35/2.0, Leitz 50/2.0 and Nikkor 85/2.0 on my M5. A polarizer is also a 1.5 stop ND filter. A polarizer is essential for streams, foliage, any time there are reflections and glare that rob your images of fine detail. Photoshop will NOT replace a polarizer.
    Latest thought on backing up your images away from town: If you are carrying a phone (who doesn't on long trails?), put a 64 Gb micro-SD card in your phone and a 16 Gb Eye-Fi Pro X2 (my friends use smaller Pro cards that may no longer be available) card in your camera. Set the Eye-Fi card to Push on Demand. Once a day (lunch stop perhaps), Push your files from the camera to the phone. The Eye-Fi Pro cards are the only ones that will Push RAW files. RAW files are the only file format that should be used for digital photography.
    That's my story and I'm sticking to it. Wondering if I should carry the Hasselblad 501 c/m or the Pentax 6x7 and a bushel of film backpacking.

    Wayne
    "You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline." Frank Zappa

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