Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-08-2015
    Location
    Germany, Bonn
    Age
    58
    Posts
    20

    Default how to dress in a sleepingbag

    I did learn to wear nothing (or just some pants for hygenic reasons). But I'm not sure... what do you wear when it does become cold (below freezing point)???
    every step is the first step to a new adventure

  2. #2
    Registered User coach lou's Avatar
    Join Date
    09-03-2011
    Location
    Old Saybrook, Connecticut
    Age
    62
    Posts
    4,730
    Images
    400

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gunther11 View Post
    I did learn to wear nothing (or just some pants for hygenic reasons). But I'm not sure... what do you wear when it does become cold (below freezing point)???
    I agee. I will wear a base layer if I know it will get into the teens.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-31-2012
    Location
    Georgia
    Age
    38
    Posts
    64

    Default

    If it gets colder wear more clothes. If you want to stay warm in a sleeping bag you need to slow down thermal convection. Thermal convention is heat transfer through the air. Our bags slow down convective heat loss by trapping the warm air radiating off our bodies, in the insulation. As the bag warms up warm air eventually gets trapped between our bodies and the bag. Your clothes also slow conductive heat loss. If you wear more clothes in your bag you are effectively increasing your bags insulation.

    The tricky part comes in when you think about our extremities, legs and arms. Sleeping naked, with your legs together and arms tucked into the body, keeps blood warmer for longer than if you were wearing clothes. You could argue the more clothes you wear, the further you are separating radiant heat from your extremities. That maybe true, but I'm of the opinion that eventually you will warm up the whole sleep system and be warmer if you wear more clothes.

    Ideally, you should wear just base layers, this allows your body to maintain radiant heat at the extremities, and slows down thermal convection. But, if you are too cold definitely put on more clothes.

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    07-31-2012
    Location
    Georgia
    Age
    38
    Posts
    64

    Default

    Also, don't forget you'll need to have the proper sleeping pad for the temps you're in. A good sleeping pad is just as important as the sleeping bag.

  5. #5
    Hiker bigcranky's Avatar
    Join Date
    10-22-2002
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Age
    57
    Posts
    7,888
    Images
    296

    Default

    I wear lightweight layers even in cool weather, 150wt merino wool, it's just more comfortable than the nylon sleeping bag against my skin. Even in hot weather wool boxer briefs and a light s/s wool top -- I can drape the quilt over my legs as needed.
    Ken B
    'Big Cranky'
    Our Long Trail journal

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    09-06-2008
    Location
    Andrews, NC
    Age
    60
    Posts
    3,643

    Default

    I always wear some sort of lightweight wind pants and long sleeved shirt in my bag or summer quilt. Keeps the bag/quilt cleaner and at least I wearing something when I have to get up at night and pee.

  7. #7
    Registered User Old Hiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-10-2009
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    2,588
    Images
    5

    Default

    I always wear undies of some sort and a t-shirt.
    Old Hiker
    AT Hike 2012 - 497 Miles of 2184
    AT Thru Hiker - 29 FEB - 03 OCT 2016 2189.1 miles
    Just because my teeth are showing, does NOT mean I'm smiling.
    Hányszor lennél inkább máshol?

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    06-10-2005
    Location
    Bedford, MA
    Posts
    12,678

    Default

    A subset of my hiking clothes are designated "always clean and dry" and used only at camp and while sleeping. In summer, I carry a thin silk base layer for that purpose. Keeps the bag from getting icky, keeps my skin from contacting the bag's nylon surface (feels icky) and adds a bit of warmth. Some kind of hat on my head also, if it's at all cold outside.

  9. #9

    Default

    Wearing too many clothes can be counter productive. However, as already mentioned, wearing a light base layer helps a lot, along with socks and a hat. I also use a silk liner and between the two can extend the range of my bag by 15-20 degrees (F) or at least keep me alive below that. But that's only good for the occasional nights where it gets unusually cold. It's not a good plan if the temps are consistently lower then what the bag can do to keep you comfortable by it's self.
    The AT - It has it's ups and downs...

  10. #10
    Registered User Just Bill's Avatar
    Join Date
    07-06-2013
    Location
    Chicago, Il
    Age
    41
    Posts
    3,772

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by daddytwosticks View Post
    I always wear some sort of lightweight wind pants and long sleeved shirt in my bag or summer quilt. Keeps the bag/quilt cleaner and at least I wearing something when I have to get up at night and pee.
    You have the clothes along anyway... might as well use them. Keeping the bag cleaner and peeing dressed are two advantages I highly second.

    keep in mind... EN ratings are established with the user wearing a base layer and light hat.
    So you won't actually be as warm as the bag is rated in anything less. I grew up with the sleep naked myth too, but that has been disproven.

    On the other end... your metabolism (heat output) drops 20-30% from resting to sleep. All your bag does is trap your heat. If you wear too many clothes, you won't push enough heat into your bag during that period when you go to bed and your metabolism drops off as you fall asleep. So while piling on clothes makes some sense, too many clothes means that you don't develop a nice cushion of hot air before you drop off. It's basically the same as getting up to pee.

    A heavy set of thermals and two hats is a good limit to keep in mind. Perhaps a light puffy being the extreme.
    Provided of course that you have enough room in your sleeping gear to maintain loft, if not you'll be warmer draping clothes over your bag than wearing them.

    One final trick... your metabolism goes up 20-30% between resting and light activity. If you find yourself needing to pile on clothes (or just as good practice in general) do some jumping jacks, jogging in place, or whatever to warm up (but not sweat) just prior to climbing in your bag. Hoping in your bag with your metabolism revved up will help "push" more warmth through your clothes and into your bag, or get your bag ramped up faster if you're a cold sleeper who has a hard time warming up a bag.

  11. #11

    Default

    During an unexpected stay in the boonies, we were left with only a ground cloth and a wool army blanket (little heavy for hiking). Temp got down to 30ish. I found a small depression bewtween the roots of a tree, ground cloth down, blanket folded once and over top from head to toe. Took my field jacket(with liner) off and put over my top torso. Boots off and tucked the bottom of blanket under feet.
    Fairly comfortable night.
    Rolls
    Rolls down the hill, Kanardly hike up the other hill
    May all your hikes have clear skies, fair winds and no rocks under your pad.

  12. #12
    Registered User FarmerChef's Avatar
    Join Date
    05-03-2012
    Location
    Northwestern, VA (outside of Harper's Ferry)
    Posts
    1,800
    Images
    4

    Default

    I have slept down into the single digits with a Z-lite sol and an Apex quilt over top. Due to the cold, I also wore Smartwool merino wool leggings and lightweight + midweight top and Darn Tough thick wool socks. I had a knit cap on my head to trap heat there as well. This systems works for me. When my wife is hiking with me (most all of the time) and sharing the quilt, I take a layer or two off or I tend to sweat with both of our body heat together. As you can probably tell, I tend to sleep warm.

    The last thing is that I bring miniature chocolate candies on winter hikes. Horrible for our teeth I know, but we eat a couple right before bed. This keeps some fire in the stove, so to speak, for a bit longer and might actually serve to ramp up the heat faster per Bill's attestation of trapping heat in the bag faster.
    2,000 miler. Still keepin' on keepin' on.

  13. #13

    Default

    Also dont forget the hat. Just liks during the day you lose a disproportionate amount of heat thru your head. Have a dry one for night time only.

    Sent from my SM-T110 using Tapatalk
    Love people and use things; never the reverse.

    Mt. Katahdin would be a lot quicker to climb if its darn access trail didn't start all the way down in Georgia.

  14. #14
    Registered User HeartFire's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-06-2005
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Age
    62
    Posts
    925
    Images
    1

    Default

    The issue with overdressing in a sleeping bag is that it can make the bag too tight - you compress the down (or other insulation) thereby decreasing its effectiveness. Layering is always warmer - it creates air pockets of warmth - but too much can cause problems.

++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •