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  1. #1
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    :banana Week-long backpacking in Maine in July

    Hey guys,
    I'm a 24 yr old female and in slightly bad shape, but I can get back into shape fairly easily and am used to carrying heavy loads on my back. I have experience in camping but in mostly warm areas and no experience in rain/snow. I'm cool with wild camping also.
    What hike SOBO or NOBO in Maine can I do in your opinion(s) for 7-10 days? And can I do it with sneakers?
    Anybody have a vague itinerary in mind?
    Thanks!

  2. #2

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    Maine miles tend to be tough miles so I won't guess how far you can get in a week, but I will advise against sneakers. Roots, rocks and mud are the majority of the trails here. Walking on roots and rocks is easier with a stiffer sole, else your feet have to work a lot harder. Mud can't be avoided at times when you can't find a root or a rock, so better to wear something you can go through it with in comfort. A shoe/boot with toe protection is also advised because you will slam your toes into those roots and rocks. A light weight shoe is ok, but definitely get something designed for trails.

  3. #3
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    Do the 100 mile wilderness. It is probably the easiest section of Maine. Don't use road running type sneakers. Trail runners ok. As LS said , lots of roots, rocks, and mud or bogs.
    I am not young enough to know everything.

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    I have thick-soled shoes that I used to wear for cross country, but are low-rise. is that ok?
    SM, do you have a link for the 100 mile wilderness?

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by lili View Post
    I have thick-soled shoes that I used to wear for cross country, but are low-rise. is that ok?
    SM, do you have a link for the 100 mile wilderness?
    Lili,

    I just recently finished planning a much longer hike (30-45 days) through Maine, starting at Baxter State Park heading SOBO. My plan through the 100 looks to be about 10-12 miles/day, taking ten days in total to get to Monson.

    I've attached my schedule to this post for you.

    From what I understand the 100 is a particularly beautiful stretch of trail, with all manner of hiking obstacles (fords and rivers, hills, valleys, boulders and wildlife to boot), and would make an excellent section hike if you've got the time.


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    That looks amazing! Are you going to carry all your food for the whole time? How does that work?

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    For the most part, I like your schedule bemental. I am not going to advise a change. It is a good schedule. I would just point out that the easiest walking on in the 100 mile wilderness is just after Cooper Brook Lean-to. Your hardest day will be day 9. Fourth Mountain sucks after the walk from The West Branch of The Pleasant River. There are stealth sites near the river. Again, not advising a change. Just be flexible. I wish I had pushed on the day I stopped at Cooper Brook.


    And to stay on topic, I agree that with a bit of planning the 100 mile wilderness is a good option for you. Just have a bail out plan if you are really concerned about ability. Possibly have a mid walk resupply. I believe bemental has one.
    Last edited by BirdBrain; 06-29-2015 at 09:37.
    In the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years. - Abraham Lincoln

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    Quote Originally Posted by BirdBrain View Post
    And to stay on topic, I agree that with a bit of planning the 100 mile wilderness is a good option for you. Just have a bail out plan if you are really concerned about ability. Possibly have a mid walk resupply. I believe bemental has one.
    BirdBrain- I'm a total newbie, so how does one set up a resupply site? Also, I thought the 100mw has no bailout options...

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by lili View Post
    BirdBrain- I'm a total newbie, so how does one set up a resupply site? Also, I thought the 100mw has no bailout options...
    https://whiteblaze.net/forum/show...=1#post1981895

    bemental can help. I have never resupplied in the 100 mile wilderness. Many do. You could bail at the resupply point.
    In the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years. - Abraham Lincoln

  10. #10
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    Lili, this link might help you:
    http://100milewilderness.info/100-mile-wilderness/

  11. #11
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    to White Blaze!

    The 100 Mile Wilderness is not a true wilderness.... You will cross roads, come across people who have driven up to lakes to go fishing, etc. The most common bailout point in the Jo-Mary Road (about half-way through). This is usually where people schedule their resupply to be dropped-off. If you are contemplating a SoBo (southbound) trek through the 100 Mile Wilderness (my personal favorite way to go!), you might want to contact the AT Lodge in Millinocket. Ole Man can hook you up with resupply, lodging, shuttles... And is a great person to talk to about info for the 100 Mile Wilderness. http://appalachiantraillodge.com/

    You could also choose to start your trek outside of Baxter Park, just past the Abol Bridge. That would save you a trip into the park... Of course, the trail from Katahdin Stream Campground (well, across the road from the campground) is pretty... Lots of options!

  12. #12
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    Wow thank you so much guys!!

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by lili View Post
    Hey guys,
    I'm a 24 yr old female and in slightly bad shape, but I can get back into shape fairly easily and am used to carrying heavy loads on my back. I have experience in camping but in mostly warm areas and no experience in rain/snow. I'm cool with wild camping also.
    What hike SOBO or NOBO in Maine can I do in your opinion(s) for 7-10 days? And can I do it with sneakers?
    Anybody have a vague itinerary in mind?
    Thanks!
    The Hundred Mile Wlderness is one of my favorite hikes. I certainly wouldn't want to discourage you from doing the hike, but I would suggest that you recruit someone to hike with you. It is a challenging hike. On one of my hikes, I met a girl exactly your age in the middle portion of the hike. The hike was taking her longer than she planned. She was out of food and was running late enough that she knew her family was in a panic. I shared some of my food and let her use my satellite phone. There are a lot of people who can help you on the AT, but hiking alone involves more risk than hiking with a companion.

    The suggested itinerary is a good one, if the weather is good. The most recent time I have done that hike, I had three days of steady rain. In the wet conditions, I found that I was unable to hike more than 10 miles a day.

    As for your question about sneakers, footwear is a highly personal choice. What works for one person won't work for someone else. Personally, I wear Vibram FiveFinger Shoes and they work fine. In my opinion, the most important thing about footwear for that hike is to have something with a tread. You will walk on everything from slick rock to moss covered planks. Street sneakers don't have enough tread to provide traction when it gets slick.

    If you would like to see pictures from the Hundred Mile Wilderness, I have some photo albums on my personal website -- http://www.davemcclung.com. It has been several years since I did that hike so the albums will be pretty far down on my album index.
    Shutterbug

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shutterbug View Post
    The Hundred Mile Wlderness is one of my favorite hikes. I certainly wouldn't want to discourage you from doing the hike, but I would suggest that you recruit someone to hike with you. It is a challenging hike. On one of my hikes, I met a girl exactly your age in the middle portion of the hike. The hike was taking her longer than she planned. She was out of food and was running late enough that she knew her family was in a panic. I shared some of my food and let her use my satellite phone. There are a lot of people who can help you on the AT, but hiking alone involves more risk than hiking with a companion.

    The suggested itinerary is a good one, if the weather is good. The most recent time I have done that hike, I had three days of steady rain. In the wet conditions, I found that I was unable to hike more than 10 miles a day.

    As for your question about sneakers, footwear is a highly personal choice. What works for one person won't work for someone else. Personally, I wear Vibram FiveFinger Shoes and they work fine. In my opinion, the most important thing about footwear for that hike is to have something with a tread. You will walk on everything from slick rock to moss covered planks. Street sneakers don't have enough tread to provide traction when it gets slick.

    If you would like to see pictures from the Hundred Mile Wilderness, I have some photo albums on my personal website -- http://www.davemcclung.com. It has been several years since I did that hike so the albums will be pretty far down on my album index.

    Hi Shutterbug, I'm going to arrange a bail-out/resupply point so I think it should be ok. I want to start at Abol Pines State Campsite, hike for 4 days (I'll pack for 5) and resupply (or bail) at a state campsite between Wadleigh LT and Potaywadjo Spring LT. Then I'll continue on using bemental's schedule until West Branch Pleasant River where I can get picked up. My main concern is White Cap and the other peaks after it :\

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by lili View Post
    Hi Shutterbug, I'm going to arrange a bail-out/resupply point so I think it should be ok. I want to start at Abol Pines State Campsite, hike for 4 days (I'll pack for 5) and resupply (or bail) at a state campsite between Wadleigh LT and Potaywadjo Spring LT. Then I'll continue on using bemental's schedule until West Branch Pleasant River where I can get picked up. My main concern is White Cap and the other peaks after it :\
    That seems like a reasonable plan. Do you have the Appalachian Trail Guide: Maine? You will need maps 1 & 2. They are available from the Maine Appalachian Trail Club for $8 each for nonmembers. I wouldn't hike that section without them.

    Also, on the last day of your hike, save a couple of hours to visit Gulf Hagas. It is just before you reach the West Branch Pleasant River. It is known as the "Grand Canyon of Maine." Don't waste your time on the north side of the Gulf Hagas Loop, but the south side is well worth a visit.
    Last edited by Shutterbug; 07-03-2015 at 20:04.
    Shutterbug

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by lili View Post
    Hi Shutterbug, I'm going to arrange a bail-out/resupply point so I think it should be ok. I want to start at Abol Pines State Campsite, hike for 4 days (I'll pack for 5) and resupply (or bail) at a state campsite between Wadleigh LT and Potaywadjo Spring LT. Then I'll continue on using bemental's schedule until West Branch Pleasant River where I can get picked up. My main concern is White Cap and the other peaks after it :\

    There are three or four of us starting the 100 mile wilderness from Baxter State Park on the 17th of July if you want company

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shutterbug View Post
    The Hundred Mile Wlderness is one of my favorite hikes. I certainly wouldn't want to discourage you from doing the hike, but I would suggest that you recruit someone to hike with you. It is a challenging hike. On one of my hikes, I met a girl exactly your age in the middle portion of the hike. The hike was taking her longer than she planned. She was out of food and was running late enough that she knew her family was in a panic. I shared some of my food and let her use my satellite phone. There are a lot of people who can help you on the AT, but hiking alone involves more risk than hiking with a companion.

    The suggested itinerary is a good one, if the weather is good. The most recent time I have done that hike, I had three days of steady rain. In the wet conditions, I found that I was unable to hike more than 10 miles a day.

    As for your question about sneakers, footwear is a highly personal choice. What works for one person won't work for someone else. Personally, I wear Vibram FiveFinger Shoes and they work fine. In my opinion, the most important thing about footwear for that hike is to have something with a tread. You will walk on everything from slick rock to moss covered planks. Street sneakers don't have enough tread to provide traction when it gets slick.

    If you would like to see pictures from the Hundred Mile Wilderness, I have some photo albums on my personal website -- http://www.davemcclung.com. It has been several years since I did that hike so the albums will be pretty far down on my album index.

    It's nice to see someone else who hikes in five finger shoes. What do you do in the winter when there is snow? I have ordered the new waterproof ones hoping they will work in the snow. I'm from florida and have not had to worry about this problem. I'm SOBO in July and will hit snow sooner or later before I finish in Georgia. Any suggestions?

  18. #18

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    Hey Guys, wanted to update those who are interested with how my little jaunt into the 100MW went as it seems pertinent to this thread as we had to bail due to an injury.

    My dog and I were hiking, when on day two (close to our planned stop) he jammed a shoulder coming down Nesutabunt Mountain. He was limping pretty badly so I carried his pack into shelter, and made the call the next morning that we'd have to cut and run as soon as we could.

    I wrote about the adventure in-depth on my blog, but the jist of it was we came upon a family at the southeastern end of Lake Nahmakanta and hitched a ride from them 26 miles down the logging roads to the Jo-Mary checkpoint near Rt. 11, where we were able to call the AT Lodge for a shuttle into Bangor (where I live).

    It wasn't the ideal bail by any stretch of the imagination, but it was possible (aided by the fact it was a busy holiday weekend).

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bemental View Post
    Hey Guys, wanted to update those who are interested with how my little jaunt into the 100MW went as it seems pertinent to this thread as we had to bail due to an injury.

    My dog and I were hiking, when on day two (close to our planned stop) he jammed a shoulder coming down Nesutabunt Mountain. He was limping pretty badly so I carried his pack into shelter, and made the call the next morning that we'd have to cut and run as soon as we could.
    Oh no!! how is he doing? Are you going to go back onto the trail soon?

    Shutterbug, I found maps online. What do you think of these? I have 3 other pics with the remaining sections


    and namaste7, I would love to join up!! I'll be starting a couple days before you, but you'll probably catch up in no time

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shutterbug View Post
    As for your question about sneakers, footwear is a highly personal choice. What works for one person won't work for someone else. Personally, I wear Vibram FiveFinger Shoes and they work fine. In my opinion, the most important thing about footwear for that hike is to have something with a tread. You will walk on everything from slick rock to moss covered planks. Street sneakers don't have enough tread to provide traction when it gets slick.
    Are these alright?
    Snapshot_2015704.jpg

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