Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5
Results 81 to 93 of 93
  1. #81
    Registered User BuckeyeBill's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-18-2012
    Location
    Dark Side of the Moon
    Age
    58
    Posts
    1,443
    Journal Entries
    6

    Default

    I'm with you on this. Just need to worry about earth shakers if you go too far.
    Blackheart

  2. #82
    Registered User Venchka's Avatar
    Join Date
    02-20-2013
    Location
    Upper East Side of Texas
    Age
    72
    Posts
    7,790

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BuckeyeBill View Post
    I'm with you on this. Just need to worry about earth shakers if you go too far.
    Grinning. I know where to stop.
    I donít go too far West.
    Wayne

  3. #83
    Registered User
    Join Date
    08-28-2007
    Location
    Georgia and Hawaii
    Posts
    16,558

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TexasBob View Post
    Why not just put the 10 essentials in your day pack and quit worrying about it? It is a day hike so what is the big deal about carrying a pound or two of stuff you might not need depending on the season? Does it really make that big a difference? Better to be over prepared than have an "Oh crud" moment when you realize that you need those items you left at home because you out smarted yourself.
    How far do the majority of hikers get into the remote "backcountry" on a day hike anyway? Is it REALLY all that backcountry most day hikers get into? C'mon. IMO the vast majority of day hikers dont veer more than 10 miles from a TH or their car or a road(sometimes major well traveled one) or from a NP lodge, etc for a RT 20 miler. I'd muse the vast majority of day hikers dont even go 20 miles RT! The safety essentials should mirror the situation, trip, and one's abilities. OMG more FAK's with more stuff most folks dont know how to use as they dont have the knowledge. How much/how often do conditions dictate that a party needs a SAT or PLB in such day hike situations? Going solo to truly remote sites or encountering dangerous situations like The Maze or canyoneering on perhaps longer distance off trail day hikes the stakes are raised. How many day hikes does that include among all those doing day hikes?

  4. #84

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    How far do the majority of hikers get into the remote "backcountry" on a day hike anyway? Is it REALLY all that backcountry most day hikers get into? C'mon. IMO the vast majority of day hikers dont veer more than 10 miles from a TH or their car or a road(sometimes major well traveled one) or from a NP lodge, etc for a RT 20 miler. I'd muse the vast majority of day hikers dont even go 20 miles RT! The safety essentials should mirror the situation, trip, and one's abilities. OMG more FAK's with more stuff most folks dont know how to use as they dont have the knowledge. How much/how often do conditions dictate that a party needs a SAT or PLB in such day hike situations? Going solo to truly remote sites or encountering dangerous situations like The Maze or canyoneering on perhaps longer distance off trail day hikes the stakes are raised. How many day hikes does that include among all those doing day hikes?
    If you are out by yourself I believe you should be prepared whether it is 5 miles or 50 miles back to the trailhead. I have never been in a car crash were I needed a seat belt but I won't drive without one on. Just because I haven't needed it doesn't mean I won't someday. I have the same attitude about the 10 essentials. Serious, what is the penalty for carrying the 10 essentials? I just don't get it.
    If you don't stand for something, you will fall for anything.

  5. #85
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-01-2014
    Location
    Norwell, MA
    Age
    56
    Posts
    2,118

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TexasBob View Post
    . . . Serious, what is the penalty for carrying the 10 essentials? I just don't get it.
    Because, for many of us, the ten essentials are not the same for each trip. So, why not just cary what you need for each trip. From one trip to the next I may want a more or less complex first aid kit. I may want a rain coat one day and a poncho the next. For a remote winter trip I may want a significantly more substantial shelter than I would carry on a short summer jaunt. I may not feel like taking the time to find and print out a map or an area I'm familiar with while I may want detailed maps on another trip. Why carry and empty water bottle if I have plenty of water along route and will treat and drink (or not treat) as appropriate along the trail. Frankly, I rarely give a rip about whether or not I have the ability to start a fire, so why bother carrying matches and fire starter for above treeline or in mid summer when nights get down to 60 degrees at most.

    Since I tune my gear for each trip, I don't have a static bag of gear that I take each time. Since I'm going through and figuring out what I need for each trip and some trips don't need some of the ten essentials, why would I put them in my bag and add useless weight and bulk.

    Seriously, what is the penalty for tuning your gear for each trip? I just don't get it.
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  6. #86
    Registered User BuckeyeBill's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-18-2012
    Location
    Dark Side of the Moon
    Age
    58
    Posts
    1,443
    Journal Entries
    6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nsherry61 View Post
    Because, for many of us, the ten essentials are not the same for each trip. So, why not just cary what you need for each trip. From one trip to the next I may want a more or less complex first aid kit. I may want a rain coat one day and a poncho the next. For a remote winter trip I may want a significantly more substantial shelter than I would carry on a short summer jaunt. I may not feel like taking the time to find and print out a map or an area I'm familiar with while I may want detailed maps on another trip. Why carry and empty water bottle if I have plenty of water along route and will treat and drink (or not treat) as appropriate along the trail. Frankly, I rarely give a rip about whether or not I have the ability to start a fire, so why bother carrying matches and fire starter for above treeline or in mid summer when nights get down to 60 degrees at most.

    Since I tune my gear for each trip, I don't have a static bag of gear that I take each time. Since I'm going through and figuring out what I need for each trip and some trips don't need some of the ten essentials, why would I put them in my bag and add useless weight and bulk.

    Seriously, what is the penalty for tuning your gear for each trip? I just don't get it.
    You bring up some valid points about tuning gear for each trip. I wonder how many "rookie" or lightly experienced hiker packed gear to handle a hurricane. More experienced hikers "know when to hold 'em and know when to fold 'em" so to speak. I see a lot of posts from members about "I'm going to do a weekend or two week hike thru so and so, should I be worried about the weather?" This is the penalty for not carrying the 10 essentials and not properly planning your trip. Until they start selling crystal balls at REI I'm going to pack all ten essentials.
    Blackheart

  7. #87

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BuckeyeBill View Post
    You bring up some valid points about tuning gear for each trip. I wonder how many "rookie" or lightly experienced hiker packed gear to handle a hurricane. More experienced hikers "know when to hold 'em and know when to fold 'em" so to speak. I see a lot of posts from members about "I'm going to do a weekend or two week hike thru so and so, should I be worried about the weather?" This is the penalty for not carrying the 10 essentials and not properly planning your trip. Until they start selling crystal balls at REI I'm going to pack all ten essentials.
    Maybe thats the clue, inexperienced hikers may benefit from the "10 essentials", experience then takes over so the essentials can be trimmed or changed for the hike. Since we are not born with this knowledge, the learning process has to start somewhere.

  8. #88
    Registered User
    Join Date
    11-01-2014
    Location
    Norwell, MA
    Age
    56
    Posts
    2,118

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BuckeyeBill View Post
    . . . Until they start selling crystal balls at REI I'm going to pack all ten essentials.
    To quote the Mountaineers Blog directly addressing the origin of the 10 essentials in their book "Freedom of the Hills" . . .

    "The Ten Essentials is a guide that should be tailored to the nature of the trip. Weather, remoteness from help, and complexity should be factored into the selected essentials."

    Why do we have such a tendency to turn good advice and guidelines into absolute dogma? I think we should treat the ten essentials an a gift of wisdom, not a club of law. A birthday dinner is a beautiful thing, but if I am allergic to dairy, it's best I leave the icecream for others to eat, and if the portions are extra
    I'm not lost. I'm exploring.

  9. #89
    Registered User BuckeyeBill's Avatar
    Join Date
    12-18-2012
    Location
    Dark Side of the Moon
    Age
    58
    Posts
    1,443
    Journal Entries
    6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Traveler View Post
    Maybe thats the clue, inexperienced hikers may benefit from the "10 essentials", experience then takes over so the essentials can be trimmed or changed for the hike. Since we are not born with this knowledge, the learning process has to start somewhere.
    You are very correct. That's why I would never tell anyone who asked if the ten essentials are needed, no they are not. I figure if they have to ask, they need to pack them.
    Blackheart

  10. #90

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Donde View Post
    Why do people still suggest old school fire starters? A bic lighter is cheap effective and reliable, just pop it in a ziplock or someother waterproof storage (say the plastic case that came with your PocketRocket perhaps, and your good to go. Tom accurately points out having the ability to start and maintain a fire in challenging conditions is esential for any of this to be useful.

    It doesnít even need fuel for the flint and steel part to work.

  11. #91

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogwood View Post
    The overall list is not particularly bad but safety items should mirror the type of trip, who one is, what one is capable of, and should include experience if just a full demo with those safety items. For example, I see little use personally for a SAT ph or PLB on the AT between may - sept in otherwise "normalized" conditions. Yes, some folks consider the AT to have backcountry segments. I've seen others carry them, full FAKs, PLBs, compasses, maps, extra "safety" apparel, etc on front country and "backcountry?" high use highly maintained trails at high use times and they didnt know how to apply these items. These become similar to snake bite kits of the past.- wasted items to carry unless they meet someone else that knows how to apply these items....which IMO takes away from the notion of what backcountry is. Rarely to never do I see an absolute need for a heavy Leatherman multitool w/ screw drivers, bottle opener, corkscrew, multiple blades, nail file, etc.
    Good post. Nothing replaces some common sense and experience. Experience has taught me that I can survive just fine when I run out of food, fuel, or water, or forget to pack my shelter, headlamp, fire-making supplies, knife, whistle, maps, communication device, rain clothes, socks, hat...

    If a hiker needs to plan for every contingency in order enjoy the outdoors, go for it. People just need to get outside and go for a walk, no matter how they do it.

  12. #92
    Administrator attroll's Avatar
    Join Date
    09-03-2002
    Location
    Denmark, Maine, United States
    Age
    59
    Posts
    5,390
    Journal Entries
    201
    Images
    471

    Default

    Fix test.

    Here
    AT Troll (2010)
    Time does not wait for you, it keeps on rolling.

    Whiteblaze.net User Agreement.

  13. #93
    Registered User Wise Old Owl's Avatar
    Join Date
    01-29-2007
    Location
    High up in an old tree
    Posts
    14,423
    Journal Entries
    19
    Images
    16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by attroll View Post
    Fix test.

    <b>Here</b>
    Not sure what this is about but what an old thread from 2015 and wow a wealth of information.
    Dogs are excellent judges of character, this fact goes a long way toward explaining why some people don't like being around them.

    Woo

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5
++ New Posts ++

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •