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  1. #41

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    I attended a Wilderness First Aid course last weekend. The instructor reported several real-world scenarios. One was a group day-hiking a popular 8-ish mile trail in the Shenandoahs. Lady fell and busted up her leg about 4 miles up the trail on the way out, about 2:30 in the afternoon.

    No cell service.

    Someone walked out to find help, lucked up and met a ranger within 30 minutes.

    It was 12:30 the next morning before they got her to the trailhead.

    You can't be prepared for everything, but you can be prepared enough to avoid becoming another patient, even on a short day hike.

  2. #42
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    03-08-2014
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    Mobile, AL
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    Quote Originally Posted by at_travis View Post
    Sounds like a good list to get people to buy things...

    Equipment can not replace knowledge.
    1+


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  3. #43
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    02-01-2016
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    Chattanooga, Tennessee
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    Quote Originally Posted by KCNC View Post
    I attended a Wilderness First Aid course last weekend. The instructor reported several real-world scenarios. One was a group day-hiking a popular 8-ish mile trail in the Shenandoahs. Lady fell and busted up her leg about 4 miles up the trail on the way out, about 2:30 in the afternoon.

    No cell service.

    Someone walked out to find help, lucked up and met a ranger within 30 minutes.

    It was 12:30 the next morning before they got her to the trailhead.

    You can't be prepared for everything, but you can be prepared enough to avoid becoming another patient, even on a short day hike.
    What exactly is the lesson here? What should have been done differently?

  4. #44

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    The lesson is to be prepared for unexpected circumstances, even if you're going on a short hike and expect to be home for dinner.

    Have some snacks, a light, a jacket, etc. - you don't need 50 lbs of equipment, but a few basic items in case things go south.

    If you end up weak and hypothermic with no way to see your way down the trail after dark then you aren't any good to anyone, you just became another liability - on top of the person who is already hurt.

    As I said - you can't be prepared for everything, but you can be prepared enough to avoid becoming another patient.

  5. #45
    Registered User BuckeyeBill's Avatar
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    12-18-2012
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    Dark Side of the Moon
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    I feel that day hikers should carry the following in order of importance: Water, food/energy bars, Shelter of some type (could even be a cheap orange/shiny emergency blanket), some means to start a fire, rain jacket and warm clothes.
    Blackheart

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