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  1. #561
    Registered User Humminbard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimmyjam View Post
    Humminbard,

    No I don't think it penetrates it but just dries on the surface. The Sawyer permethrin I use says for clothing and tents so I put on my clothes, shoes, tarp, net tent, and foam sit pad. I'm keeping my fingers crossed, but I've yet to get a tick bite over 450+ AT miles.
    jimmyjam, (and anyone who might wonder about the effectiveness of permethrin): My experience was a summer bushwhacking hike in the James River Face Wilderness through thick brush with six other people. Every one of them got a horrible case of chiggers. Not me. I was the only one wearing clothing treated with Sawyer permethrin. I'm a believer.

  2. #562
    Registered User dangerdave's Avatar
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    I had mine treated by the wonderful people at InsectShield. They claim it's good for seventy "launderings". We shall see how it stands up.

    Does a heavy thunderstorm count as a "laundering"?
    AKA "DANGER" AT Thru-Hiker Class of 2015

  3. #563
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    According to the InsectShield folks, t's not the water that causes reduces the effectiveness, it is the agitation action of the washing machine.
    Remote for detachment, narrow for chosen company, winding for leisure, lonely for contemplation, the Trail beckons not merely north and south, but upward to the body, mind, and soul of man.


  4. #564
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    Quote Originally Posted by dangerdave View Post
    About 2200' as the crow flies.
    Sweet!!!!!

  5. #565

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    Treated my clothes, shoes, pack with Permethrin. Didn't do my tent, although, I usually do. Hope it works! Also, had my dr give me a prescription for Lyme treatment. Not sure if I should go ahead and fill it....another item to carry!

  6. #566

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    Hi everyone,
    I finally made the decision earlier this month and things are coming together! I've got most of my gear (mostly from a while back, sitting and waiting for something like this), the apartment and cat will be taken care of, I'm staying in DC sometime the first week of May, and I registered with the ATC! The plan is to take the train to HF and head North.
    I expect to be quite slow the first few weeks but I'm not putting any pressure on myself for the first while. I've accumulated weight that I will need to start shedding a little :P Until May, walk walk walk.
    It would be really nice to meet other beginners around there! I'm a bit sad that I definitely won't make it for the 2nd. I also wonder around what time people who start in in Georgia get to HF?

  7. #567
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    Welcome Mithadon! Plenty of slow pokes on the trail not to mention the groups of all kinds at each shelter, both fast and slow, young and old. The nobos are slowly showing up already with the bigger waves coming thru from May to July. I hope to meet u out there. Have a great time!

  8. #568

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    Hi Treehugger, thanks for the reply!
    When people say that there are a lot of people on the trail... what exactly do they mean? How many people would you expect to meet in one day?

  9. #569
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    Well, flip floppers wont meet as many thru hiker wannabees as a nobo but u will still run across them and of course section and day hikers too. Weekends bring out the day trippers and boyscouts too. I started about 10 days ago (home temporarily due to a.bum knee) and had 3-5 people in the shelters each night with me. Not a bad egg to be found tho. Each and every person I met or travelled with contributed to my experience in a positive way. If u want alone time, you will have it, not to worry. But other people tend to add.energy to your day also. I wud occaisionally not see anyone for hours only to have several at the shelter for comraderie. All good so far.

  10. #570
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    TH, how's the knee? I'm starting nobo from Thornton Gap with Falconer this Friday if you want to join up. We're slow pokes and can assist if needed.

    Charliehorse

  11. #571

    Default Volunteer Opportunities at the Flip Flop Kick Off!

    Hey, Flip-Flopper Supporters on this thread,

    We have some volunteer opportunities available for you!

    We're looking for people who work well with others, are happy to take and follow instructions, and can keep a smile on their face no matter what :-)

    The biggest need:

    Cookout Volunteers
    We need help with the cookout that is being hosted adjacent to ATC at the local fraternal organization, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Virginia Lodge No. 1. The cookout is from 12 to 2 on Saturday, and help is also needed with set-up and clean-up, so from about 10:30 to 3:30. If you have an hour or two or more to help, we need you. I've attached photos from last year's cookout the Odd Fellows hosted for the Warrior hikers. The Odd Fellows building is really cool, too. It was built before the Civil War and has graffiti from soldiers both inside and outside the building.

    Other Roles


    Friday
    Presentation Room set-up
    Other roles to be determined

    Saturday
    Signage set up (early am)
    Flip-Flopper Coffee and Donuts supply helper (8-10:30am)
    Event info table (4, two-hour shifts with two people each)
    Parking area host
    Roaming Greeter
    Clean up (5-6 pm)
    Other roles to be determined

    Sunday
    Pancake breakfast (set-up, assist the cook, clean-up) 6-9 am

    If you have interest and availability in any of these, please go to our online registration at www.appalachiantrail.org/volunteer and search for ATC HQ Events 2015 - Flip Flop Kick Off May 2-3. You can just enter "flip" into the keyword search and it will come up, but you may need to scroll down to see it.

    If you have any questions, email me at lpotteiger@appalachiantrail.org.

    Laurie

  12. #572
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    Thanks Charliehorse. i go to the doc tomorrow morning. Feeling better, not percect but not painful. I am ready to go! If I get the all clear I may just take u up on that! Let u know soon, thanks again!!

  13. #573

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Treehugger View Post
    Well, flip floppers wont meet as many thru hiker wannabees as a nobo but u will still run across them and of course section and day hikers too. Weekends bring out the day trippers and boyscouts too. I started about 10 days ago (home temporarily due to a.bum knee) and had 3-5 people in the shelters each night with me. Not a bad egg to be found tho. Each and every person I met or travelled with contributed to my experience in a positive way. If u want alone time, you will have it, not to worry. But other people tend to add.energy to your day also. I wud occaisionally not see anyone for hours only to have several at the shelter for comraderie. All good so far.
    Treehugger,
    Hope you can get out there quickly. Look forward to meeting you!

  14. #574

    Default

    Treehugger,

    Sorry to hear you are off-trail temporarily but not in too much pain, and taking care of yourself! That's so important.

    Rooting for you!

  15. #575

    Default Leave No Trace Session early Saturday 8 am during Flip Flop Kick Off

    Hey guys,

    ATC would like to offer a Leave No Trace session for flip-floppers that doesn't compete with anything else during the schedule. If you have not had any Leave No Trace training, we would strongly encourage you to take part. It is probably the most valuable gift you can give to the Trail, your fellow hikers, and those who take care of the Trail. If you learn some skills right in the beginning, you will hopefully get to practice them for the next 6 or 7 months, and will be ambassadors for best practices!

    Lauralee "Blissful" Bliss, multi-year ridgerunner, 2x 2,000-miler, and A.T. blogger is willing to lead a session on Saturday. During the day you can hopefully catch one of the bear-bag and cat-hole digging sessions.

    Who would be interested in a short Leave No Trace session at 8:00 a.m. before the coffee-and-on Saturday, May 2?

    If you would like to attend, please send me an email with "FFKO Leave No Trace" in the subject line to lpotteiger@appalachiantrail.org.

    If you want to participate in some Leave No Trace training but totally cannot think of doing it as early as 8am, look at the schedule at www.appalachiantrail.org/flipflop and suggest another time.

    Laurie

  16. #576

    Default

    I'm getting comments about the hike from Harpers Ferry starting May 3rd that I'm going to hit the black flies in New Hampshire and Maine. Following the schedule I have (and everything goes great...no guarantees) I would be Vermont around mid-June, New Hampshire..first of July..and Maine end of July to start toward Katahdan 3rd week of August. Can someone tell me where the black flies are; what state in what month? Thanks!

  17. #577
    Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ladyofthewoods View Post
    I'm getting comments about the hike from Harpers Ferry starting May 3rd that I'm going to hit the black flies in New Hampshire and Maine. Following the schedule I have (and everything goes great...no guarantees) I would be Vermont around mid-June, New Hampshire..first of July..and Maine end of July to start toward Katahdan 3rd week of August. Can someone tell me where the black flies are; what state in what month? Thanks!
    This is from: Maine Nature News

    Black Fly Info

    Black flies really are a nuisance but I hope you won’t let that keep you inside. There are repellents and gear that work well to protect you from being bitten. Get out and enjoy Maine nature – even the black flies. You can tell everyone you’ve experienced the black flies and lived to tell about it!
    Black flies bring more readers to Maine Nature News than anything else. It isn’t the moose, foliage, loons, hiking, river rafting or even a combination of all of these – it’s the black flies. Dress appropriately, use a little spray and have fun!
    I speak with the media each spring about black flies. If you’re a writer/reporter you’re welcome to email me.
    Gene Thompson
    Editor, Maine Nature News
    When is “Black Fly Season”?
    There is actually no single, uniform “black fly season.” The maps in the Maine Nature News archive are based on scattered local observations. But, there is enough information there to draw some tentative general conclusions for some locations in Maine.
    Do the black flies persist after July? What is the best time to camp and hike in Maine and avoid the flies?
    Black fly larvae, which hatch in clear running streams, do not hatch until everything thaws and the water temperature has also risen a bit. The black fly season moves, in general, from South to North and simultaneously from the coastal plain to inland areas and from lowest elevations up to the highest. So there is no precise “end” to black fly season in Maine. However by mid-July in most places after the birds have start gobbling them up, and after the black fly adults have bred for the season and go into “dormancy”, the numbers dwindle drastically almost everywhere. During wet summers like 2009, the black flies can still be prevalent in late summer.
    Here are some more key pieces of information, as a further general answer to your question:

    • Black flies breed in running water, unlike mosquitoes, which breed in still water. Because there are about forty species, not all flourish at the same time.
      Black flies can travel several miles from their breeding site, so those environmental rules cannot be counted on completely, as a means to avoid them.
    • Strong breezes tend to disperse them, as they are a very small insect.
      I have found, and others confirm, that black flies are generally inactive until the air temperature has risen to at least 50 degrees F., even in black fly season.
      I have also found that they seem less numerous at higher altitudes, probably because of a combination of the above three factors: the lack of expansive breeding sites, cooler temperatures and the more consistent presence of breezes.
    • “Black flies are strongly influenced by color — they find dark hues more attractive than pale ones, and blue, purple, brown, and black more attractive than white or yellow. A light-colored shirt, therefore, is a much better choice of clothing than a dark blue one. It is a moot point, however, whether blue jeans might not be better than pale trousers: if they are carefully tucked in at the ankles and are without holes, jeans may help to attract the flies away from the head region.”: Courtesy Rocco Moschetti, IPM of Alaska.
    • “Black flies often swarm around a person’s head because they are attracted to carbon dioxide in the breath. … Bites are concentrated on exposed areas of skin, especially along the hairline, feet, ankles and arms.” Courtesy Jeffrey Hahn, University of Minnesota Extension Service.
    • “The bites can produce a variety of reactions ranging from little or no irritation to considerable irritation and swelling. Sensitivity varies from person to person.” Courtesy Jeffrey Hahn, University of Minnesota Extension Service.
    • In general, unlike mosquitoes, they will not fly at night or penetrate most clothing.
    • Local variation is the rule. Local people are usually the most helpful resource, as they observe these things very carefully.
    • Head nets and body nets really work, if one takes care to leave no gaps where the netting meets the shoulders or the ankles. Head nets can be draped over the hat you usually wear, or a version with an internally attached cap can be purchased. When used without a cap, care must be taken to leave a small space all around the head that the insect cannot penetrate.


  18. #578
    Registered User dangerdave's Avatar
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    I welcome the black flies, AKA buffalo gnats. They are part of the full AT experience.

    Nasty buggers! We get them here in Ohio as well, early in the season.
    AKA "DANGER" AT Thru-Hiker Class of 2015

  19. #579

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dwill1000 View Post
    This is from: Maine Nature News

    Black Fly Info

    Black flies really are a nuisance but I hope you won’t let that keep you inside. There are repellents and gear that work well to protect you from being bitten. Get out and enjoy Maine nature – even the black flies. You can tell everyone you’ve experienced the black flies and lived to tell about it!
    Black flies bring more readers to Maine Nature News than anything else. It isn’t the moose, foliage, loons, hiking, river rafting or even a combination of all of these – it’s the black flies. Dress appropriately, use a little spray and have fun!
    I speak with the media each spring about black flies. If you’re a writer/reporter you’re welcome to email me.
    Gene Thompson
    Editor, Maine Nature News
    When is “Black Fly Season”?
    There is actually no single, uniform “black fly season.” The maps in the Maine Nature News archive are based on scattered local observations. But, there is enough information there to draw some tentative general conclusions for some locations in Maine.
    Do the black flies persist after July? What is the best time to camp and hike in Maine and avoid the flies?
    Black fly larvae, which hatch in clear running streams, do not hatch until everything thaws and the water temperature has also risen a bit. The black fly season moves, in general, from South to North and simultaneously from the coastal plain to inland areas and from lowest elevations up to the highest. So there is no precise “end” to black fly season in Maine. However by mid-July in most places after the birds have start gobbling them up, and after the black fly adults have bred for the season and go into “dormancy”, the numbers dwindle drastically almost everywhere. During wet summers like 2009, the black flies can still be prevalent in late summer.
    Here are some more key pieces of information, as a further general answer to your question:

    • Black flies breed in running water, unlike mosquitoes, which breed in still water. Because there are about forty species, not all flourish at the same time.
      Black flies can travel several miles from their breeding site, so those environmental rules cannot be counted on completely, as a means to avoid them.
    • Strong breezes tend to disperse them, as they are a very small insect.
      I have found, and others confirm, that black flies are generally inactive until the air temperature has risen to at least 50 degrees F., even in black fly season.
      I have also found that they seem less numerous at higher altitudes, probably because of a combination of the above three factors: the lack of expansive breeding sites, cooler temperatures and the more consistent presence of breezes.
    • “Black flies are strongly influenced by color — they find dark hues more attractive than pale ones, and blue, purple, brown, and black more attractive than white or yellow. A light-colored shirt, therefore, is a much better choice of clothing than a dark blue one. It is a moot point, however, whether blue jeans might not be better than pale trousers: if they are carefully tucked in at the ankles and are without holes, jeans may help to attract the flies away from the head region.”: Courtesy Rocco Moschetti, IPM of Alaska.
    • “Black flies often swarm around a person’s head because they are attracted to carbon dioxide in the breath. … Bites are concentrated on exposed areas of skin, especially along the hairline, feet, ankles and arms.” Courtesy Jeffrey Hahn, University of Minnesota Extension Service.
    • “The bites can produce a variety of reactions ranging from little or no irritation to considerable irritation and swelling. Sensitivity varies from person to person.” Courtesy Jeffrey Hahn, University of Minnesota Extension Service.
    • In general, unlike mosquitoes, they will not fly at night or penetrate most clothing.
    • Local variation is the rule. Local people are usually the most helpful resource, as they observe these things very carefully.
    • Head nets and body nets really work, if one takes care to leave no gaps where the netting meets the shoulders or the ankles. Head nets can be draped over the hat you usually wear, or a version with an internally attached cap can be purchased. When used without a cap, care must be taken to leave a small space all around the head that the insect cannot penetrate.

    Dwill1000, Thanks for the great info.

  20. #580

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    Quote Originally Posted by dangerdave View Post
    I welcome the black flies, AKA buffalo gnats. They are part of the full AT experience.

    Nasty buggers! We get them here in Ohio as well, early in the season.
    DangerDave,

    As your name suggests, you are Dangerous!

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