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  1. #21

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    Hey Walt, I posted this on WB in a GoPro thread but hope you don't mind me sharing on your report:


  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    It's a scary spot for us feeble over-sixty folks who prefer to stay on the ground and not get airborne, and it's probably not a place for kids---the overlook that is. But when I first saw the view I thought of flying down to the creek.

    uh-huh, yeah right....Tipi is far from feeble....dude is a solid piece of muscle and shames me as a person 20 years younger. I hope to be that fit when I'm in my mid-sixties.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    It's a scary spot for us feeble over-sixty folks who prefer to stay on the ground and not get airborne, and it's probably not a place for kids---the overlook that is. But when I first saw the view I thought of flying down to the creek.
    Yup, I shy away from the airy views right at the edge, like standing' on McAfee knob...won't see me out there, preferring some things around me to hang on to, and provide a little spacial comfort zone. Funny I use to rock climb, and then got vertigo about 15 years ago, doctors don't know why, said it could have been a virus or medicines I take, can't seem to shake it. But every time I gain some elevation I try. Funnier still, even watching a movie with wild airy views will sometimes throw me off my chair. like Thelma and Louise when they go over the cliff...I get sucked in and start ta grabbin' for things, It's quite funny to watch says one friend of mine....says he!

  4. #24

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    Thanks a bunch Patman for the video addition and for the other vids you have made from recent trips. BTW, Patman played the guitar soundtrack on this video which is pretty neato.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by PatmanTN View Post
    uh-huh, yeah right....Tipi is far from feeble....dude is a solid piece of muscle and shames me as a person 20 years younger. I hope to be that fit when I'm in my mid-sixties.
    I hear ya!

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    Thanks a bunch Patman for the video addition and for the other vids you have made from recent trips. BTW, Patman played the guitar soundtrack on this video which is pretty neato.
    yeah, caught that,but didn't know, it was real good Patman, keep em comin

  7. #27

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    ...funny in the video how Mr.Snake comes over to see about lunch, decides to go top side (up scope) for a better look, see's how big you are.....and books.

  8. #28

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    yeah that was really cool and fun to see that snake; he was a beautiful to watch in the water. though I know they aren't poisonous, I found myself almost involuntarily backing away as it swam towards me..you can see my backwards movement in the video, lol

  9. #29

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    also meant to say that I swam for like two hours at that swim hole; just couldn't stop playing it was so cozy, it was one of the more pleasant such experiences I've had in a while. the swim holes seemed to be much more user friendly in the Piz than the ones I'm used to in the Smokies and Unicois in terms of bottom surface and water temp

  10. #30
    Registered User Cadenza's Avatar
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    05-11-2012
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    Tellico Plains, TN
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    Cool video, Patman.
    Watching Tipi Walter get up with that pack is impressive in person. The vid can't quite capture the gravity of the situation.
    I liked the snake at 1:07
    The whole area looks like a place I should explore.

  11. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by PatmanTN View Post
    also meant to say that I swam for like two hours at that swim hole; just couldn't stop playing it was so cozy, it was one of the more pleasant such experiences I've had in a while. the swim holes seemed to be much more user friendly in the Piz than the ones I'm used to in the Smokies and Unicois in terms of bottom surface and water temp
    yeah they probably warm up real nice and get flushed out and cleaned pretty regularly so to keep away the stagnant stuff, cozy seems a perfect description.

  12. #32
    Peakbagger Extraordinaire The Solemates's Avatar
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    10-30-2003
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    Appalachian Ohio
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    hey Tipi, any reason why you dont hike long distance trails instead of staying in the same area?
    The only thing better than mountains, is mountains where you haven't been.

    amongnature.blogspot.com

  13. #33

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    Thanks for the pics and video, looks like a really neat place to hike.

  14. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Solemates View Post
    hey Tipi, any reason why you dont hike long distance trails instead of staying in the same area?
    It's really a question of not relying on shuttles as a long linear trail puts me too far from my drop-off point whereas if I explore a certain area for 3 weeks I can make my way back to where I started. Usually Little Mitten drops me off and if I hiked a long trail she would have to drive a couple hundred extra miles to reach me at the end.

    I pulled two long trips into the Mt Rogers backcountry a couple years ago and both times I left my car at the NRA headquarters---friendly folks---but the hike to Mt Rogers was over 30 miles away. So, I hiked and played in the Crest Zone for a couple weeks and then had to hike 30 miles north on the AT back to my car at the NRA. Don't really like relying on shuttles.

  15. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    It's really a question of not relying on shuttles as a long linear trail puts me too far from my drop-off point whereas if I explore a certain area for 3 weeks I can make my way back to where I started. Usually Little Mitten drops me off and if I hiked a long trail she would have to drive a couple hundred extra miles to reach me at the end.

    I pulled two long trips into the Mt Rogers backcountry a couple years ago and both times I left my car at the NRA headquarters---friendly folks---but the hike to Mt Rogers was over 30 miles away. So, I hiked and played in the Crest Zone for a couple weeks and then had to hike 30 miles north on the AT back to my car at the NRA. Don't really like relying on shuttles.
    What appeals to me about this style is you really get to know an area well, instead of just cruising through it, I often hear you refer to camping at a certain spot, and that it makes for a good camp clearing, that kinda info is invaluable to my way of thinking as far as good camp sites go (whatever ones requirements are, view, flat ground, no poison ivy, trees to hang from or shade ya, water near by ect. ) it can be counted on for the most part.

  16. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by rocketsocks View Post
    What appeals to me about this style is you really get to know an area well, instead of just cruising through it, I often hear you refer to camping at a certain spot, and that it makes for a good camp clearing, that kinda info is invaluable to my way of thinking as far as good camp sites go (whatever ones requirements are, view, flat ground, no poison ivy, trees to hang from or shade ya, water near by ect. ) it can be counted on for the most part.
    Most of my best trips are repeat trips to a known area with known water sources and known (beloved) campsites. I equate it to going to a 5-star hotel which is on your usual tour circuit and knowing exactly which room you want to stay. "I'm shooting for that campsite by Wildcat Falls on Slickrock Creek by the heart-rock formation."

    Eventually you develop a "black book" list of hundreds of campsites in a 3 state area and know where to go in a lightning storm vs a calm day vs a call for incoming tornadoes or a polar vortex (or 7 day blizzard). "Where do you want to make your stand??" is the pertinent question. If your brain is a memory stick of all your potential homes for the night, and you even have Plan B (second sites) for each one, well, you're set for almost any conditions.

  17. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tipi Walter View Post
    Most of my best trips are repeat trips to a known area with known water sources and known (beloved) campsites. I equate it to going to a 5-star hotel which is on your usual tour circuit and knowing exactly which room you want to stay. "I'm shooting for that campsite by Wildcat Falls on Slickrock Creek by the heart-rock formation."

    Eventually you develop a "black book" list of hundreds of campsites in a 3 state area and know where to go in a lightning storm vs a calm day vs a call for incoming tornadoes or a polar vortex (or 7 day blizzard). "Where do you want to make your stand??" is the pertinent question. If your brain is a memory stick of all your potential homes for the night, and you even have Plan B (second sites) for each one, well, you're set for almost any conditions.
    Nice, like having a second sleep pad when the one your carrying develops a hernia at an inopportune moment, (as if there's any good time for a blow out).

  18. #38

    Default ASU? Conservative? I doubt it.......not that there's anything wrong with that........

    Quote Originally Posted by rocketsocks View Post
    what kind is that? is Appalachia State uber conservative?
    The Appalachian State University I graduated from in 1978 was about as far from conservative as could be between 1973 and 1978. Pretty much "no rules, just right".

    Great report, TW, and thanks for the detailed and well-photographed write up. By the way, I day-hiked over to "Nowhere", aka Rich Mountain, aka "Garden of the Gods" (I think that's what your group called it) along the Carriage Trails in Moses Cone Park last weekend. The trees have grown up at the summit such that there is no longer a decent view, certainly not the 360 degree lookout like in the 1970s. It's still cool to stroll through there and recall all the fun we had up that way 35-40 years back.

    Keep up the great work and the reports.

    AO

  19. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alleghanian Orogeny View Post
    The Appalachian State University I graduated from in 1978 was about as far from conservative as could be between 1973 and 1978. Pretty much "no rules, just right".

    Great report, TW, and thanks for the detailed and well-photographed write up. By the way, I day-hiked over to "Nowhere", aka Rich Mountain, aka "Garden of the Gods" (I think that's what your group called it) along the Carriage Trails in Moses Cone Park last weekend. The trees have grown up at the summit such that there is no longer a decent view, certainly not the 360 degree lookout like in the 1970s. It's still cool to stroll through there and recall all the fun we had up that way 35-40 years back.

    Keep up the great work and the reports.

    AO
    That's cool, I got my first degree from ASU in '78 too, a BS in Health Education. And thanks for the good comments.

    I really miss old Rich Mountain, what we called the Temple of the Gods because it had a strange rock circle on top with a dead mulberry tree in the middle. This was back in the mid to late 1980's. There could be a road up to the top now for all I know. "Our" Temple of the Gods was reached at least 3 ways I know of---from Trout Lake at the bottom on the spiral horse trail to the top (the carriage trails). #2---From a nearby road on the southwest side(??) where we parked and hiked up. #3---the best way---hiking up thru Lost Valley (Boone lake) by following the creek all the way to a ridge and then making a left turn to the top of the mountain. Always a favorite place for cross country skiers in the winter.

    BTW, part of the carriage/trout lake trail is the Mountains to Sea trail.

  20. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alleghanian Orogeny View Post
    The Appalachian State University I graduated from in 1978 was about as far from conservative as could be between 1973 and 1978. Pretty much "no rules, just right".

    Great report, TW, and thanks for the detailed and well-photographed write up. By the way, I day-hiked over to "Nowhere", aka Rich Mountain, aka "Garden of the Gods" (I think that's what your group called it) along the Carriage Trails in Moses Cone Park last weekend. The trees have grown up at the summit such that there is no longer a decent view, certainly not the 360 degree lookout like in the 1970s. It's still cool to stroll through there and recall all the fun we had up that way 35-40 years back.

    Keep up the great work and the reports.

    AO
    ah got cha...good deal, walks down memory lane are a nice way to re-live a moment in time.

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